Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGettysburg Battlefield
IN THE NEWS

Gettysburg Battlefield

FEATURED ARTICLES
EXPLORE
June 3, 2013
New Covenant Christian School kindergartner Logan Cavey, 6, recites a portion of the Gettysburg Address to Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett on Memorial Day at the monument on the Gettysburg Battlefield, commemorating the delivery in November 1863 of President Abraham Lincoln's famous battlefield address. Corbett and Logan crossed paths as the governor was waiting to participate in the official 3 p.m. battlefield memorial service. Logan was visiting the Gettysburg Battlefield with his parents, Scott and Becky Cavey, of Bel Air. A ministry of New Covenant Presbyterian Church in Abingdon, New Covenant Christian School is a preschool through 12th grade classical school with campuses in Bel Air and Abingdon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
June 3, 2013
New Covenant Christian School kindergartner Logan Cavey, 6, recites a portion of the Gettysburg Address to Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett on Memorial Day at the monument on the Gettysburg Battlefield, commemorating the delivery in November 1863 of President Abraham Lincoln's famous battlefield address. Corbett and Logan crossed paths as the governor was waiting to participate in the official 3 p.m. battlefield memorial service. Logan was visiting the Gettysburg Battlefield with his parents, Scott and Becky Cavey, of Bel Air. A ministry of New Covenant Presbyterian Church in Abingdon, New Covenant Christian School is a preschool through 12th grade classical school with campuses in Bel Air and Abingdon.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | July 10, 1991
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- Gettysburg is under siege, and the struggle is as much over fallow fields as hallowed ground.Spurred by the widening of a nearby highway and the opening of a Wal-Mart to call its own, this historic town is witnessing unprecedented pressure from developers, one of whom is proposing a 320,000-square-foot shopping center that would abut the Civil War battlefield.The plan has loosed volleys of displeasure not heard since the Erector-set-like, 330-foot-tall National Tower observation platform was raised nearly a score of years ago.Gettysburg Borough and the surrounding townships have long been at odds over the nature and amount of development that should be permitted, with some municipal officials contending that the economy has suffered by attempts to keep the park setting pristine.
NEWS
By Gregory Romano and Gregory Romano,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
While the annual Gettysburg battle re-enactment always provides a great deal of action and excitement, it also serves to support preservation around the area. Every year, the Gettysburg Anniversary Committee chooses a number of different organizations to support. The 141st Gettysburg Re-enactment, which took place last summer, was no different. One of the organizations supported by the re-enactment was the National Trust for Historic Gettysburg. According to the Annual Gettysburg Civil War Battle Re-enactment Web site, the National Trust is involved in a number of restoration efforts around Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Gregory Romano and Gregory Romano,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
While the annual Gettysburg battle re-enactment always provides a great deal of action and excitement, it also serves to support preservation around the area. Every year, the Gettysburg Anniversary Committee chooses a number of different organizations to support. The 141st Gettysburg Re-enactment, which took place last summer, was no different. One of the organizations supported by the re-enactment was the National Trust for Historic Gettysburg. According to the Annual Gettysburg Civil War Battle Re-enactment Web site, the National Trust is involved in a number of restoration efforts around Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 1998
THOUSANDS OF CIVIL War re-enactors will relive the three-day Battle of Gettysburg this weekend, and Roy Ashe, of Roy's Clock Shop in Hampstead, will be one of them.It's planned as the largest re-enactment to be staged on the Gettysburg fields, with about 15,000 men in uniform for the 135th anniversary of the battle.Ashe will portray his ancestor William Joynes, who served at age 19 as a private in the Confederate infantry, the 3rd Virginia volunteers known as the "Dismal Swamp Rangers."In his portrayal, Ashe will be a member of the 4th Virginia Cavalry, Company A -- but considerably older, somewhat heavier and more fortunate than the typical soldier who rode a horse.
NEWS
By Alec Klein | July 12, 1998
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- So, you want to learn about the Civil War.You go to Gettysburg. Big battle. Museum. Artifacts everywhere: cannon, muskets, pistols, bullets, flags.Slavery?Didn't slavery have something to do with it? You navigate through the halls of the Visitor Center of the Gettysburg National Military Park, past the exhibits on Civil War navies, medicines, canteens.Then you come to the closest thing on slavery -- a glass case the size of, say, a Yugo. It is an exhibit about U.S. Colored Troops.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
Joel H. Rosenblatt worked on the design of the Bay Bridge, the Cabin John Bridge and the Capital Beltway. But the National Tower at Gettysburg is nearest and dearest to his heart. And the 320-foot-tall hourglass-shaped structure he designed to look out over the battlefield shouldn't be blown up, he says. It should be proudly preserved. Reviled as visual pollution by park officials and historic preservationists, the tower was a marvel of engineering in the early 1970s, said Rosenblatt.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 4, 1997
An article in Saturday's editions incorrectly referred to the battle flag reproduced on Maryland license plates for members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans as the Stars and Bars. The Stars and Bars, with horizontal stripes, was the Confederate national flag.The Sun regrets the errors.You don't have to be a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans to own a Maryland license tag with a Confederate symbol. In fact, you probably have one on your car right now.The stylized red and white cross that appears in the state seal and flag -- and on most Maryland license tags -- was a powerful symbol of Confederate sympathy in Maryland during and after the Civil War.Maryland men fighting in Confederate regiments often wore the cross on their lapels and incorporated it into their unit flags.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1995
In the first prosecution under a law that protects Maryland's sunken historic heritage, criminal charges have been filed against three treasure hunters state officials say were caught last fall using metal detectors in the South River, just off the historic London Town House & Gardens.Objects confiscated in the case, which has raised concern among hobbyists who apparently were not aware of the law, include coins and metal objects dating from the mid-1700s. "Excavating on historical property is like stealing silverware from Mount Vernon or digging up parts of the Gettysburg battlefield," said William D. Roessler, deputy Anne Arundel County state's attorney.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
Joel H. Rosenblatt worked on the design of the Bay Bridge, the Cabin John Bridge and the Capital Beltway. But the National Tower at Gettysburg is nearest and dearest to his heart. And the 320-foot-tall hourglass-shaped structure he designed to look out over the battlefield shouldn't be blown up, he says. It should be proudly preserved. Reviled as visual pollution by park officials and historic preservationists, the tower was a marvel of engineering in the early 1970s, said Rosenblatt.
NEWS
By Alec Klein | July 12, 1998
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- So, you want to learn about the Civil War.You go to Gettysburg. Big battle. Museum. Artifacts everywhere: cannon, muskets, pistols, bullets, flags.Slavery?Didn't slavery have something to do with it? You navigate through the halls of the Visitor Center of the Gettysburg National Military Park, past the exhibits on Civil War navies, medicines, canteens.Then you come to the closest thing on slavery -- a glass case the size of, say, a Yugo. It is an exhibit about U.S. Colored Troops.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 1998
THOUSANDS OF CIVIL War re-enactors will relive the three-day Battle of Gettysburg this weekend, and Roy Ashe, of Roy's Clock Shop in Hampstead, will be one of them.It's planned as the largest re-enactment to be staged on the Gettysburg fields, with about 15,000 men in uniform for the 135th anniversary of the battle.Ashe will portray his ancestor William Joynes, who served at age 19 as a private in the Confederate infantry, the 3rd Virginia volunteers known as the "Dismal Swamp Rangers."In his portrayal, Ashe will be a member of the 4th Virginia Cavalry, Company A -- but considerably older, somewhat heavier and more fortunate than the typical soldier who rode a horse.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | July 10, 1991
GETTYSBURG, Pa. -- Gettysburg is under siege, and the struggle is as much over fallow fields as hallowed ground.Spurred by the widening of a nearby highway and the opening of a Wal-Mart to call its own, this historic town is witnessing unprecedented pressure from developers, one of whom is proposing a 320,000-square-foot shopping center that would abut the Civil War battlefield.The plan has loosed volleys of displeasure not heard since the Erector-set-like, 330-foot-tall National Tower observation platform was raised nearly a score of years ago.Gettysburg Borough and the surrounding townships have long been at odds over the nature and amount of development that should be permitted, with some municipal officials contending that the economy has suffered by attempts to keep the park setting pristine.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.