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NEWS
November 23, 2013
Now do you get it? When President Barack Obama promised to redistribute the wealth, people didn't think he meant their meager savings. When he promised health care for everyone, they didn't think it would change theirs. When he bowed to foreign kings, people thought he was being polite. When he apologized for America's behavior they got a little uneasy, and when he said America wasn't a Christian nation, people said any religion was accepted here. I could go on ad nauseam, but the most sickening was leaving God out of his rendition of the Gettysburg Address, a sacred American document.
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TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Halfway through the eight-stop Savor Gettysburg Food Tour, I was slowing down. I had already eaten chicken fajitas and pork carnitas at El Costeno, followed by gooey macaroni and cheese with big lumps of crab meat at One Lincoln. I had sampled more than a few varieties of hard cider and red wine at the retail shop of Hauser Estate Winery. Now, seated at the rustic wooden bar on the second floor of the Garryowen Irish Pub, I looked warily at the dish in front of me, laden with yet more food: a dollop of creamy mashed potatoes topped with a single sausage slice and slivers of caramelized onion; a six-bite serving of shepherd's pie; and a tiny breakfast sandwich, consisting of a quarter-sized sweet biscuit, topped with a round of ham and a quail's egg. "Fun fact," said our tour guide, Lori Korczyk, in the same cheerful tone she had employed all morning, whether she was telling us about the excellent local restaurants or the horrific Civil War battle that had made thw town famous.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Today's 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address is getting a lot of attention. Here are five things you probably didn't know about the speech: 1. The speech was not delivered at the battle of Gettysburg, which was fought in July. It marked the dedication of a Union cemetery, one that still draws many visitors today. 2. President Abraham Lincoln was not the featured speaker at the 1863 dedication. That honor went to Edward Everett, whose lofty career included time as a clergyman, U.S. senator and president of Harvard University.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
Now do you get it? When President Barack Obama promised to redistribute the wealth, people didn't think he meant their meager savings. When he promised health care for everyone, they didn't think it would change theirs. When he bowed to foreign kings, people thought he was being polite. When he apologized for America's behavior they got a little uneasy, and when he said America wasn't a Christian nation, people said any religion was accepted here. I could go on ad nauseam, but the most sickening was leaving God out of his rendition of the Gettysburg Address, a sacred American document.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Kurtz | November 18, 2013
Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address 150 years ago this Tuesday. At 272 words, it is a model of brevity and a testament to Lincoln's political wisdom. He shows us that words can clarify, challenge, inspire. Perhaps most of all, they can stop us in the muck of our political selfishness and prompt us to imagine a country greater than the silly procedural games and hate-filled diatribes that pass for civic discourse these days. Last April, I visited Gettysburg National Military Cemetery on a field trip with my college students.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and By Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | October 7, 2001
Fire, by Sebastian Junger. W.W. Norton. 224 pages. $24.95. Sebastian Junger has sophomore slump. How else can one explain, Fire, the mish-mash that is his second book? Four years ago, Junger took readers inside the world of commercial fishing and violent weather with The Perfect Storm, a highly acclaimed best-seller turned into a mediocre movie. The riveting tale moved smartly in 227 pages from the docks of Gloucester, Mass., to monster waves in the North Atlantic. Unfortunately for readers, Fire goes nowhere.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | April 18, 1991
Ken Burns showed us in his PBS documentary that the "Civil War" produced enough true stories that fictionalizing this period of history should not be necessary.Nevertheless, this broad and inviting canvas has provided a firm foundation for effective invented stories, from "The Red Badge of Courage" to "Gone With the Wind."It serves that purpose well once again for ABC's Sunday night movie, "The Perfect Tribute," a moving interweaving of a fictional story and a fairly accurate accounting of the events surrounding the delivery of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg address.
NEWS
June 28, 1998
A transcription error resulted in the wrong date for President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address in Sunday's editions. The address was delivered Nov. 19, 1863.The Sun regrets the error.On Nov. 23, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln made a speech at Gettysburg, dedicating part of the battlefield as a cemetery for the soldiers who died there. Generations of students have read and sometimes memorized this speech when they studied the Civil War:Fourscore and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to bTC the proposition that all men are created equal.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
GETTYSBURG, PA. -In a second-level room of a red brick house, the bed where President Abraham Lincoln slept before his most famous speech made its debut yesterday. The twin-size mahogany masterpiece is already the most popular exhibit at the David Wills House, which was swarmed with about 1,000 visitors on its first day open to the public, the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth. It was a day marked by President Barack Obama at a ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda, where Obama said he felt a special gratitude to the 16th president.
FEATURES
November 19, 2005
Nov. 19 1863 --- President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address as he dedicated a national cemetery at the Civil War battlefield.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal and The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
Today's 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address is getting a lot of attention. Here are five things you probably didn't know about the speech: 1. The speech was not delivered at the battle of Gettysburg, which was fought in July. It marked the dedication of a Union cemetery, one that still draws many visitors today. 2. President Abraham Lincoln was not the featured speaker at the 1863 dedication. That honor went to Edward Everett, whose lofty career included time as a clergyman, U.S. senator and president of Harvard University.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Kurtz | November 18, 2013
Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address 150 years ago this Tuesday. At 272 words, it is a model of brevity and a testament to Lincoln's political wisdom. He shows us that words can clarify, challenge, inspire. Perhaps most of all, they can stop us in the muck of our political selfishness and prompt us to imagine a country greater than the silly procedural games and hate-filled diatribes that pass for civic discourse these days. Last April, I visited Gettysburg National Military Cemetery on a field trip with my college students.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
Last week, the Harrisburg, Pa., Patriot-News' editorial board did something we editorial writers are loath to do: admit a monumental error in judgment. With tomorrow's 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address fast approaching, the current editorialists at what was, in 1863, the Patriot & Union, felt it incumbent upon themselves to officially apologize for their predecessors' dismissal of the most celebrated presidential remarks in our nation's history as "silly.
EXPLORE
June 3, 2013
New Covenant Christian School kindergartner Logan Cavey, 6, recites a portion of the Gettysburg Address to Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett on Memorial Day at the monument on the Gettysburg Battlefield, commemorating the delivery in November 1863 of President Abraham Lincoln's famous battlefield address. Corbett and Logan crossed paths as the governor was waiting to participate in the official 3 p.m. battlefield memorial service. Logan was visiting the Gettysburg Battlefield with his parents, Scott and Becky Cavey, of Bel Air. A ministry of New Covenant Presbyterian Church in Abingdon, New Covenant Christian School is a preschool through 12th grade classical school with campuses in Bel Air and Abingdon.
TRAVEL
May 24, 2009
Memorial Day Parade at Gettysburg Where: : The parade will begin at Lefever Street and head northeast to Middle Street, turn west on East Middle Street and south on Baltimore Street to the Soldiers' National Cemetery. When: : 2 p.m. Monday. A service at Gettysburg National Cemetery will follow. What: : The 142nd annual Memorial Day Parade, the nation's oldest. Soldiers injured in Iraq and Afghanistan will be among the guests. How much: : Free. What's nearby: : The David Wills House, 8 Lincoln Square, is a new museum in downtown Gettysburg and where Abraham Lincoln worked out the finishing touches on his Gettysburg Address.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
GETTYSBURG, PA. -In a second-level room of a red brick house, the bed where President Abraham Lincoln slept before his most famous speech made its debut yesterday. The twin-size mahogany masterpiece is already the most popular exhibit at the David Wills House, which was swarmed with about 1,000 visitors on its first day open to the public, the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth. It was a day marked by President Barack Obama at a ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda, where Obama said he felt a special gratitude to the 16th president.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | November 28, 2008
WASHINGTON - So much for the wisdom of The People. A new report from the Intercollegiate Studies Institute on the nation's civic literacy finds that most Americans are too ignorant to vote. Out of 2,500 American quiz-takers, including college students, elected officials and other randomly selected citizens, nearly 1,800 flunked a 33-question test on basic civics. In fact, elected officials scored slightly lower than the general public with an average score of 44 percent compared to 49 percent.
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