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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 30, 1991
There are a lot of rap groups trying to be bad these days, but few can match the bad rap the Geto Boys have earned.First, there was the dust-up with Geffen Records last year, in which the label refused to distribute the group's last album, "The Geto Boys," because label executives were uncomfortable with raps like "Mind of a Lunatic," a first-person account of murder and rape.Then there's the situation with Wal-Mart and K mart, neither of which will touch the group's current album, "We Can't Be Stopped," because of its foul language and violent lyrics.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 10, 1998
In the wee hours of March 9, 1997, Christopher Wallace -- a man known to millions of rap fans as Biggie Smalls or Notorious B.I.G. -- was shot to death while sitting in a black Chevy Suburban outside the Petersen Automotive Museum in the Wilshire district of Los Angeles.Coming barely six months after the similarly violent demise of fellow rap star Tupac Shakur, Biggie's death left the rap world reeling. There was an immediate outpouring of grief -- and a flood of rumors. Many wondered if the two deaths weren't an outgrowth of the much-hyped gangsta rap "war" between the West Coast crew of Death Row Records (of which Tupac was a part)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 28, 1990
XINXS (Atlantic 82151)Mainstream rock rewards many things -- strong voices, resilient melodies, insistent rhythms -- but subtlety isn't one of them. So how is it, then, that INXS has managed such enormous success making such subtle music? Listen to "X," the band's latest, and none of the songs are particularly overt in their pop appeal. Sure, "By My Side" boasts the same sort of melancholy swing "Tear Us Apart" had, while "Suicide Blonde" builds a giddy momentum from its rhythm guitars and blues harp, but the band never beats us over the head with such devices.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | April 25, 1996
Geto BoysThe Resurrection (Rap-a-Lot/Noo Trybe 41555)N.W.A. may have spun off a more impressive set of solo careers (Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, Eazy E), but album-for-album, the Geto Boys was easily the greatest of the gangsta rap acts. Moreover, as "The Resurrection" makes clear, Scarface, Bushwick Bill and Willie D still have it. Two years after releasing their farewell album, "Till Death Do We Part," the group is back, and profane as ever. Yet for all the verbal violence, there's seldom the sense that these raps glorify violence; instead, what the rough language of "Open Minded" and "I Just Wanna Die" conveys is the group's outrage at the brutality of a culture that values clothes and cars more than the people in them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 19, 1993
MY WORLDRay Charles (Warner Bros. 26735)Everybody knows Ray Charles can sing. In fact, he can pull more out of a melody than almost any pop star alive. But even he can only do so much, a point that's driven home with unfortunate clarity on "My World." This isn't a bad album, mind; unlike the low-budget "Would You Believe?," Charles surrounded by top-flight players on almost every track, and the material takes him from bass-pumping funk ("Let Me Take Over") to straight up spirituals ("So Help Me God")
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 4, 1992
SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMYParis (Scarface SCR007-100)Bush Killa," in which rapper Paris fantasizes about de-electing the president, may be the most controversial track on "Sleeping With the Enemy," but it's by no means the most provocative. Because Paris isn't interested in killer rhymes -- he's talkin' 'bout a revolution in the truest sense of the term. And to that extent, the fuss over "Bush Killa" and its cop-killer companion, "Coffee, Donuts and Death," distract attention from the album's real agenda: urging African-Americans to take down the white-controlled capitalist system that keeps them in economic slavery.
FEATURES
May 30, 1993
Here's a look at some of the best bets in this summer's concert season:Suede, with Suddenly Tammy. June 1 at the 930 Club. England's hottest new alternative band makes its American debut in D.C. See them now, boast about it later.Mary-Chapin Carpenter. June 27 at Pier Six. Not only does Carpenter keep getting better, but it's a benefit to boot.Van Halen, with Vince Neil. July 17 and 18 at Merriweather. Rock guitar fans should go wild for this one, which boasts not one but two fretboard virtuosos: Eddie Van Halen (with Van Halen)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | April 25, 1996
Geto BoysThe Resurrection (Rap-a-Lot/Noo Trybe 41555)N.W.A. may have spun off a more impressive set of solo careers (Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, Eazy E), but album-for-album, the Geto Boys was easily the greatest of the gangsta rap acts. Moreover, as "The Resurrection" makes clear, Scarface, Bushwick Bill and Willie D still have it. Two years after releasing their farewell album, "Till Death Do We Part," the group is back, and profane as ever. Yet for all the verbal violence, there's seldom the sense that these raps glorify violence; instead, what the rough language of "Open Minded" and "I Just Wanna Die" conveys is the group's outrage at the brutality of a culture that values clothes and cars more than the people in them.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 22, 1993
AUSTIN, Texas -- Fourteen months after an inner-city Housto teen-ager aimed his 9mm gun at the neck of a Texas state trooper outside Victoria and pulled the trigger, the question before the court is this: Does life imitate rap?The answer will reverberate nationwide from the Austin courtroom -- from the boardrooms of the record industry to the mean streets of gangster rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur. It will be felt from the small Texas town of the trooper's widow to the jail cell of Ronald Ray Howard, a reputed cocaine dealer and seventh-grade dropout who killed the officer.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 10, 1998
In the wee hours of March 9, 1997, Christopher Wallace -- a man known to millions of rap fans as Biggie Smalls or Notorious B.I.G. -- was shot to death while sitting in a black Chevy Suburban outside the Petersen Automotive Museum in the Wilshire district of Los Angeles.Coming barely six months after the similarly violent demise of fellow rap star Tupac Shakur, Biggie's death left the rap world reeling. There was an immediate outpouring of grief -- and a flood of rumors. Many wondered if the two deaths weren't an outgrowth of the much-hyped gangsta rap "war" between the West Coast crew of Death Row Records (of which Tupac was a part)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 9, 1995
When Senator Bob Dole attacked the entertainment industry in a fund-raising speech last week, he pulled no punches. Popular music, movies and television were responsible for "mainstreaming deviancy" in our society, he said; they are "bombarding our children with destructive messages of casual violence and even more casual sex."Music was particularly criticized by the presidential candidate. "A line has been crossed -- not just of taste, but of human dignity and decency," he thundered. "It is crossed every time sexual violence is given a catchy tune.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 22, 1993
AUSTIN, Texas -- Fourteen months after an inner-city Housto teen-ager aimed his 9mm gun at the neck of a Texas state trooper outside Victoria and pulled the trigger, the question before the court is this: Does life imitate rap?The answer will reverberate nationwide from the Austin courtroom -- from the boardrooms of the record industry to the mean streets of gangster rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur. It will be felt from the small Texas town of the trooper's widow to the jail cell of Ronald Ray Howard, a reputed cocaine dealer and seventh-grade dropout who killed the officer.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 22, 1993
AUSTIN, Texas -- Fourteen months after an inner-city Housto teen-ager aimed his 9mm gun at the neck of a Texas state trooper outside Victoria and pulled the trigger, the question before the court is this: Does life imitate rap?The answer will reverberate nationwide from the Austin courtroom -- from the boardrooms of the record industry to the mean streets of gangster rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur. It will be felt from the small Texas town of the trooper's widow to the jail cell of Ronald Ray Howard, a reputed cocaine dealer and seventh-grade dropout who killed the officer.
FEATURES
May 30, 1993
Here's a look at some of the best bets in this summer's concert season:Suede, with Suddenly Tammy. June 1 at the 930 Club. England's hottest new alternative band makes its American debut in D.C. See them now, boast about it later.Mary-Chapin Carpenter. June 27 at Pier Six. Not only does Carpenter keep getting better, but it's a benefit to boot.Van Halen, with Vince Neil. July 17 and 18 at Merriweather. Rock guitar fans should go wild for this one, which boasts not one but two fretboard virtuosos: Eddie Van Halen (with Van Halen)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 19, 1993
MY WORLDRay Charles (Warner Bros. 26735)Everybody knows Ray Charles can sing. In fact, he can pull more out of a melody than almost any pop star alive. But even he can only do so much, a point that's driven home with unfortunate clarity on "My World." This isn't a bad album, mind; unlike the low-budget "Would You Believe?," Charles surrounded by top-flight players on almost every track, and the material takes him from bass-pumping funk ("Let Me Take Over") to straight up spirituals ("So Help Me God")
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 4, 1992
SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMYParis (Scarface SCR007-100)Bush Killa," in which rapper Paris fantasizes about de-electing the president, may be the most controversial track on "Sleeping With the Enemy," but it's by no means the most provocative. Because Paris isn't interested in killer rhymes -- he's talkin' 'bout a revolution in the truest sense of the term. And to that extent, the fuss over "Bush Killa" and its cop-killer companion, "Coffee, Donuts and Death," distract attention from the album's real agenda: urging African-Americans to take down the white-controlled capitalist system that keeps them in economic slavery.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 22, 1993
AUSTIN, Texas -- Fourteen months after an inner-city Housto teen-ager aimed his 9mm gun at the neck of a Texas state trooper outside Victoria and pulled the trigger, the question before the court is this: Does life imitate rap?The answer will reverberate nationwide from the Austin courtroom -- from the boardrooms of the record industry to the mean streets of gangster rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur. It will be felt from the small Texas town of the trooper's widow to the jail cell of Ronald Ray Howard, a reputed cocaine dealer and seventh-grade dropout who killed the officer.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 9, 1995
When Senator Bob Dole attacked the entertainment industry in a fund-raising speech last week, he pulled no punches. Popular music, movies and television were responsible for "mainstreaming deviancy" in our society, he said; they are "bombarding our children with destructive messages of casual violence and even more casual sex."Music was particularly criticized by the presidential candidate. "A line has been crossed -- not just of taste, but of human dignity and decency," he thundered. "It is crossed every time sexual violence is given a catchy tune.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 30, 1991
There are a lot of rap groups trying to be bad these days, but few can match the bad rap the Geto Boys have earned.First, there was the dust-up with Geffen Records last year, in which the label refused to distribute the group's last album, "The Geto Boys," because label executives were uncomfortable with raps like "Mind of a Lunatic," a first-person account of murder and rape.Then there's the situation with Wal-Mart and K mart, neither of which will touch the group's current album, "We Can't Be Stopped," because of its foul language and violent lyrics.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 16, 1990
Court decisions to the contrary, 2 Live Crew's "As Nasty As They Wanna Be" is by no means as raunchy as rap gets. In the months since the Crew's album was declared obscene in Florida, sexually explicit rap has become something of a growth industry, with an expanding number of acts out to prove just how nasty they can be.Although the vast majority of rappers rarely venture beyond the innocent innuendo of Candyman's "Knockin' Boots," a few make no bones about...
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