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NEWS
April 7, 2013
The president is voluntarily giving 5 percent of his yearly salary back to the U.S. Treasury in order to show solidarity with government workers forced to take unpaid leaves due to what he calls the catastrophic effects of the sequestration ("President's pay cut," April 4.) Through this meaningless symbolic gesture he wants us to know that he shares our pain. I wonder if the president will apply for food stamps next, or a Section 8 housing voucher. He reminds me of an old Latin saying: Parturiunt montes, nascetur ridiculus mus - "the mountain groaned loudly in great labor, then bore a tiny mouse.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Richard J. Cross III | March 11, 2014
Symbols are meaningful in politics. Sometimes, a gesture as simple as a handshake can resonate with tremendous importance. For me, the most important handshake in American history occurred in China on February 21, 1972. By way of background, John Foster Dulles - President Dwight Eisenhower's secretary of state and a staunch anti-communist - refused to shake Chinese leader Chou En Lai's hand at a conference in Geneva in 1954. He later quipped that the only time he'd meet with Chou would be if their cars accidentally collided.
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SPORTS
By From Sun news services | November 17, 2009
The NFL has fined Titans owner Bud Adams $250,000 for making an obscene gesture at Buffalo fans while celebrating Tennessee's victory over the Bills. Commissioner Roger Goodell notified Adams of the fine Monday. League spokesman Greg Aiello said it was for conduct detrimental to the NFL. Adams was seen making the gesture while in his luxury suite and again on the field after Sunday's 41-17 victory. Adams, 86, issued an apology a couple of hours later, saying he got caught up in the excitement.
NEWS
October 1, 2013
For many Americans, the shutdown of the federal government has few, if any, immediate consequences. The mail will still be delivered, taxes will be owed, and many other services will continue for a time (even as some basic functions, from keeping Head Start classrooms open to processing some veterans' benefits, may not). But here in Maryland, the furlough of 124,000 civilian government workers will be felt most acutely, as the cost in state and local tax collections alone is projected to be about $5 million per day. Such shutdowns have happened before, and the nation has survived.
NEWS
November 14, 1991
Voters in Takoma Park last week narrowly approved a referendum calling for the extension of municipal voting rights to non-citizens. Sometimes derided as "Berkeley East," Takoma Park has a history of trendy gestures. It has proclaimed itself a nuclear-free zone and a sanctuary for Central American refugees. Now it has declared that aliens, legal or not, shouldn't be discriminated against just for not being American.That sounds noble, and furthermore appears at first sight to rest upon a principle as old as the Republic -- no taxation without representation.
FEATURES
By Barbara Mahany and Barbara Mahany,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 19, 1997
CHICAGO -- You do it all the time. You do it wildly, at cocktail parties. You might even do it in the shower. You certainly do it on the phone. And you absolutely do it whenever you explain to someone how to get from there to here.You flail. You point. You curl and uncurl your fingers. You twirl your hand this way and that.In a word, you gesture.Ah, you think, nothing to it. Just random fly-swatting. Something to do with your paws while your jaw flaps up and down.No. You are, in a word, wrong.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | March 7, 2004
President Bush doesn't get much praise in this space. He hardly gets any at all, actually. But last week, the president indulged in a single, simple gesture that made me proud, for it symbolized what real democracy is about. The president picked up the telephone and called Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts to congratulate him on his effective victory as the Democratic Party's nominee for president - that is, for the right to run against Bush in this year's election. American freedom and liberty are much bally-hooed in support of many causes, from war to religion and many other enterprises, some decent, some not. Often the rallying call is misused, abused even.
SPORTS
By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
A Major League Baseball official confirmed yesterday that the league fined Miguel Tejada, who was caught by television cameras making an apparent obscene gesture to a fan during the Orioles' 4-3 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays at the Rogers Centre on Wednesday. The amount of the fine was undisclosed, but both league and Orioles officials considered the gesture out of character for Tejada, who is regarded as one of the most fan-friendly players in baseball. "I want to apologize to everyone, especially to the Orioles fans and the fans in Toronto, for my action in Wednesday's game," said Tejada in a statement released by the Orioles yesterday.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | October 10, 1999
SHEILA DIXON is stuck on a single tick of the clock. The years go by, but a community's perception holds her in this awful instant, and is chilled by the memory of her famously waving a shoe and becoming a public heel.The Baltimore City Council was drawing lines in the sand then, allegedly about redistricting, but really about race. The council chambers were packed, and voices were raised, and Dixon took off one of her shoes, waved it about and pounded a table and, in a shrill voice, cried, "The shoe is on the other foot now."
NEWS
March 25, 1991
We have the uneasy feeling that City Councilwoman Sheila Dixon may have done herself a regrettable but lasting disservice with her dramatic gesture with her shoe last week. As has been amply reported, Dixon took off her shoe to dramatically underscore her statement, which was ominous enough in its own right: "You've been running things for the last 20 years. Now the shoe is on the other foot. See how you like it."By "you" she meant her white colleagues on the Baltimore City Council. Dixon's sense of indignation is, no doubt, rooted in demonstrable injustice in the past.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | September 26, 2013
Washington is preoccupied with two all-consuming debates right now. First, of course, is Syria. President Barack Obama placed his faith in two wholly untrustworthy figures. Syrian President Bashar Assad has shown himself to be a consummate liar, and Russian President Vladimir Putin's overarching goals on Syria are to protect Mr. Assad and show up the United States. Meantime, Democrats and Republicans are locked in ever more hostile arguments over the price that right-wing zealots are trying to exact to pass the annual budget and extend the debt ceiling.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Baltimore's speed cameras are off-line for the second time this year after officials found faults with some of the tickets issued by the city's new camera system vendor. Officials say they will void or refund nearly 600 erroneous tickets. We would be inclined to compliment the city for how seriously it is taking the responsibility to eliminate all errors from the program if there weren't something so odd about this latest twist in the Baltimore speed camera saga. According to a news release issued by the Department of Transportation late Tuesday afternoon, the city decided to shut the cameras down after finding some "clerical mistakes" involving the payment options listed on tickets and the speed limit near one camera on the Alameda.
NEWS
April 7, 2013
The president is voluntarily giving 5 percent of his yearly salary back to the U.S. Treasury in order to show solidarity with government workers forced to take unpaid leaves due to what he calls the catastrophic effects of the sequestration ("President's pay cut," April 4.) Through this meaningless symbolic gesture he wants us to know that he shares our pain. I wonder if the president will apply for food stamps next, or a Section 8 housing voucher. He reminds me of an old Latin saying: Parturiunt montes, nascetur ridiculus mus - "the mountain groaned loudly in great labor, then bore a tiny mouse.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2013
The Atlantic permits someone named Jen Doll to write on language and usage , and Ms. Doll has Views on singular they . Those views are not favorable. Examples of singular they "make me cringe. " Further, "The singular they is ear-hurting, eye-burning, soul-ravaging, mind-numbing syntactic folly. Stop the singular they . Stop it now. " To be fair, Ms. Doll makes a gesture of addressing the arguments for they as the missing epicene pronoun in English.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
On the day that the Howard County school board apologized for the system's treatment of African-American students during segregation, Dottie Cook thought back to her middle school days, when she received a hand-me-down education that included tattered books with her uncle's name written in them. An African-American resident from Dayton, Cook said her family petitioned the Howard school board to allow her to go to a school that white students attended - a more modern school with new books - and they were told she could but only if she got permission from the bus driver to be taken there.
EXPLORE
March 21, 2012
On March 12, my wife and I entered Catonsville, via Frederick Road, traveling east to a doctor appointment at 4 p.m. Suddenly, our car was enveloped in a cloud of steam coming from the engine, forcing us to stop on the side of the road. An urgent call to AAA assured us that assistance would arrive in 30-45 minutes. Some 15-20 minutes later, as I was examining the engine, a gentleman, approaching from behind, tapped me on my shoulder to ask the nature of our problem. I assumed he was the AAA service contractor.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1997
The first time I interviewed him, about a year ago, he came out of his office to meet me, smiling warmly and extending both his hands in an open, welcoming gesture.I did not know it then, of course, but in those first moments of our meeting the very essence of Taghi Modarressi was laid bare: His warmth, his optimism, his eagerness to welcome and embrace the world.Such qualities served Dr. Modarressi well in both his passions: psychiatry and writing.As a child psychiatrist he set himself the highest of goals -- to find the answer to one of life's most compelling and mysterious questions: What goes on in the mind of a baby?
FEATURES
By Amanda Vogt and Amanda Vogt,Chicago Tribune | June 25, 1998
Traveling abroad? Be careful how you express yourselfGestures Americans consider harmless, even polite, are considered rude in other countries. Here's some handy advice:* All thumbs: If you should find yourself in Australia eating shrimp off the barbie, don't express your satisfaction to the cook with a "thumbs up." If you do, you're likely to get a punch in the nose. The gesture expressing satisfaction in America is the equivalent of a raised middle finger Down Under.* Sign language: The "OK" sign (formed by making a circle with thumb and forefinger)
NEWS
February 8, 2012
County Councilman Jerry Walker wants to make English the official language of Anne Arundel County. That would make perfect sense if English weren't already, for all practical purposes, the county's official language. When was the last time you heard someone complain they couldn't read a county parking ticket or other official document because it was written in Urdu or Farsi? The fact that this never occurs ought to be a clue: This is not serious legislation but rather a piece of political theater that would achieve nothing more than puffing up the councilman's reputation among the anti-immigrant crowd.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
The Orioles detailed on Monday several of their upcoming changes to Camden Yards, including a permanent tribute to the six most decorated players in modern franchise history and a slight alteration to the right-field wall. As part of Camden Yards' 20th anniversary, the club will honor their six Hall of Famers with bronze statues in a picnic grove beyond the batter's eye wall in center field this year. The statues — in the likeness of Frank and Brooks Robinson , Earl Weaver , Jim Palmer, Eddie Murray and Cal Ripken Jr. — will range from seven to eight feet in scale and weigh between 600 and 1,500 pounds each.
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