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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Blanca Tidemand, who was a member of the Danish Resistance during World War II and helped Jews to escape to safety, died of complications from a fractured neck Feb. 10 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 92 and lived in Mays Chapel Village. Born Blanca Petersen in Marstal, Denmark, she was the daughter of a sea captain. She completed high school and was a gymnast and piano player. She married Odin Tidemand in 1938 and moved to Copenhagen. After Germany occupied the country during World War II, she and her husband became active in the Danish Resistance.
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NEWS
June 26, 2014
Take a minute and Google the term "Internal Revenue Service" or "IRS," and you will find no shortage of famous quotes from people who are fearful of it. The federal agency has been compared to the Gestapo, the Mafia and the Lord Almighty. Such is the power of the tax collector to strike terror into the hearts of the audited. But recent testimony before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has conjured a new image for the IRS - clueless, bureaucratic, disorganized and technologically incompetent.
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NEWS
March 17, 2007
LUCIE AUBRAC, 94 French Resistance leader Lucie Aubrac, a hero of the French Resistance who helped free her husband from the Gestapo and whose dramatic life story became a hit film, died Wednesday in Paris. Born on June 29, 1912, in the eastern city of Macon, Ms. Aubrac was a history and geography teacher when she and her husband, engineer Raymond Samuel, helped create Liberation-Sud, or Liberation-South. Liberation-South was one of the first networks set up by the Resistance, a French movement to continue warfare against Germany after France's 1940 defeat in World War II. The couple adopted the nom de guerre Aubrac in the Resistance.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
The common denominator in the ongoing crisis of killings on the streets of Baltimore is the gun ("Man, woman fatally shot in West Baltimore," July 11). Optics of rallies, marches and prayer vigils are fine but do not materially impact the problem. Spend time in the affected neighborhoods and you can quickly identify persons of interest. Certainly, the local police officers know the bad actors. The missing tactic in controlling street violence is "stop and frisk. " Such a strategy would be viewed by many as profiling, infringement of personal liberty, and Gestapo policing.
FEATURES
May 31, 2004
May 31 1889: More than 2,000 people perished when a dam break sent water rushing through Johnstown, Pa. 1962: World War II Gestapo official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel for his role in the Nazi Holocaust. 1977: The trans-Alaska oil pipeline, three years in the making, was completed. 1989: House Speaker Jim Wright, dogged by questions about his ethics, announced he would resign. 1991: Leaders of Angola's two warring factions signed a peace treaty, ending a 16-year-old civil war.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 6, 1995
Boston. -- The ceremonies are over, but I would like to suggest one last way to commemorate the golden anniversary of the defeat of the Nazis. How about a moratorium on the current abuse of terms like storm trooper, swastika, holocaust, Gestapo, Hitler? How about putting the language of the Third Reich into mothballs?The further we are removed from the defeat of the Nazis, the more this vocabulary seems to be taking over our own. It's become part of the casual, ubiquitous, inflammatory speech Americans use to turn each other into monsters.
NEWS
By George Dail | February 25, 1993
OVER the past week, Marylanders have had front-row seats on a war waged and won by the state's thought gestapo. While the enemy supposedly was John S. Arnick, the war was really waged against free thought and free public discourse, against people who cry out for fairness and justice.The methods are always the same: The gestapo screams the theme, the media adopt it and the mindless join the chorus: "The man is a bigot. He's a racist, an antisemite, and, most important, he hates gays and women."
NEWS
July 12, 2013
The common denominator in the ongoing crisis of killings on the streets of Baltimore is the gun ("Man, woman fatally shot in West Baltimore," July 11). Optics of rallies, marches and prayer vigils are fine but do not materially impact the problem. Spend time in the affected neighborhoods and you can quickly identify persons of interest. Certainly, the local police officers know the bad actors. The missing tactic in controlling street violence is "stop and frisk. " Such a strategy would be viewed by many as profiling, infringement of personal liberty, and Gestapo policing.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
In 1938, a Gestapo agent appeared at the door of Eva and Hermann Salomon, a Berlin physician and his wife.Mrs. Salomon, 92, who now lives in Sykesville, said she knew the Nazi had come for one reason: to find some pretense to send the Jewish couple to their deaths.A car waited outside."I knew that car was to take us to a concentration camp," Mrs. Salomon said.The Gestapo officer produced a file containing information on all the Salomons' financial dealings."I tried to take care of our finances," she said, "but that man knew much more about them than I did."
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
One of Baltimore's largest community groups is threatening to evict a municipal agency from its headquarters after city workers came there Thursday and changed locks, moved furniture and commandeered additional office space.Lois A. Garey, executive director of the HARBEL community group, compared the city's methods to "Gestapo tactics," and City Council President Mary Pat Clarke accused the city of "fiscal thuggery."The confrontation grows out of a months-old dispute between the city Department of Housing and Community Development and officials of HARBEL, which includes 92 community associations in Northeast Baltimore and nearby sections of Baltimore County.
EXPLORE
August 16, 2011
My wife and I, Clarksville residents since 1973, have just returned from vacation and found the post office closing and the county gestapo at Kendall's door. What on earth is going on? From last week's Flier I got the details, plus the locals' comments, particularly those in George DeGennaro's letter, which I enthusiastically support. I am a retired professional engineer with some experience in planning and road construction, and for the life of me cannot see any benefit to routing excess traffic around Kendall's Hardware and dumping it in a used car lot!
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
Blanca Tidemand, who was a member of the Danish Resistance during World War II and helped Jews to escape to safety, died of complications from a fractured neck Feb. 10 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 92 and lived in Mays Chapel Village. Born Blanca Petersen in Marstal, Denmark, she was the daughter of a sea captain. She completed high school and was a gymnast and piano player. She married Odin Tidemand in 1938 and moved to Copenhagen. After Germany occupied the country during World War II, she and her husband became active in the Danish Resistance.
NEWS
March 17, 2007
LUCIE AUBRAC, 94 French Resistance leader Lucie Aubrac, a hero of the French Resistance who helped free her husband from the Gestapo and whose dramatic life story became a hit film, died Wednesday in Paris. Born on June 29, 1912, in the eastern city of Macon, Ms. Aubrac was a history and geography teacher when she and her husband, engineer Raymond Samuel, helped create Liberation-Sud, or Liberation-South. Liberation-South was one of the first networks set up by the Resistance, a French movement to continue warfare against Germany after France's 1940 defeat in World War II. The couple adopted the nom de guerre Aubrac in the Resistance.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | November 5, 2006
Richard Sonnenfeldt was greasing an armored car at the end of 1944 when the general known as Wild Bill Donovan plucked him from the motor pool to become chief American interpreter at the first Nuremberg War Crimes Trial. He'd been in a reconnaissance unit equipped with armored cars, jeeps and light tanks. "Our job was to find the enemy, draw fire and get out of the way," he said during a telephone conversation. Heavier tanks and artillery would then "root out the enemy." He had been born in Germany and he was just 15 years old when he escaped.
FEATURES
May 31, 2004
May 31 1889: More than 2,000 people perished when a dam break sent water rushing through Johnstown, Pa. 1962: World War II Gestapo official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel for his role in the Nazi Holocaust. 1977: The trans-Alaska oil pipeline, three years in the making, was completed. 1989: House Speaker Jim Wright, dogged by questions about his ethics, announced he would resign. 1991: Leaders of Angola's two warring factions signed a peace treaty, ending a 16-year-old civil war.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2002
During World War II, in a last desperate move to the west, 25 German divisions hurled themselves through a 60-mile front that was barely held by six divisions of U.S. troops. The battle for control of the front that extended from Monschau to Luxembourg began in the early morning of Dec. 16, 1944. For George J. Pinsch, 73, a Baltimore barber and Luxembourg native, December brings back memories of the war, the Nazi occupation of his homeland and the friends and neighbors who disappeared into concentration camps and were never seen again.
EXPLORE
August 16, 2011
My wife and I, Clarksville residents since 1973, have just returned from vacation and found the post office closing and the county gestapo at Kendall's door. What on earth is going on? From last week's Flier I got the details, plus the locals' comments, particularly those in George DeGennaro's letter, which I enthusiastically support. I am a retired professional engineer with some experience in planning and road construction, and for the life of me cannot see any benefit to routing excess traffic around Kendall's Hardware and dumping it in a used car lot!
NEWS
By Henry Weinstein and Henry Weinstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 7, 2001
For more than 50 years, Nazi hunters and historians have tried in vain to discover what happened to Gestapo chief Heinrich Muller, who vanished in 1945 at the end of World War II. Of all the major Nazis, Muller, who was Adolf Eichmann's immediate superior, is the most important still unaccounted for, according to many Holocaust experts. Now, efforts to solve the mystery are resuming, including attempts to answer the most provocative question: Was Muller briefly in U.S. custody after the war?
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