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Gertrude Stein

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By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | July 9, 1995
"Favored Strangers: Gertrude Stein and Her Family," by Linda Wagner-Martin. Rutgers University Press. 346 pages. $34.94Does anything remain to be said about modernist writer Gertrude Stein, her lesbian relationship with Alice Toklas and her '20s Paris salon on the rue de Fleurus? In what purports to be a biography of Stein and her family, particularly her mentor brother, the art collector and critic Leo, Linda Wagner-Martin, a professor at the University of North Carolina, promises to reveal Stein as daughter and sister.
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NEWS
March 10, 2014
One of The Sun's readers was very upset about hurting the Inner Harbor's reputation with the recent reporting of a dead body found floating there, the ninth in recent months ( "Sun gives the Inner Harbor a bad name ," March 6). Aren't newspapers supposed to print the facts? Should the article have tried to whitewash or soft pedal this shameful situation? Our "crown jewel" does not always gleam the way you would like it to no matter how much you try to polish it. Gertrude Stein said it best, "A rose is a rose is a rose.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1996
Robert D. Myers, a retired Baltimore advertising executive and Civil War enthusiast who drank tea with famed author and art collector Gertrude Stein shortly after Paris was liberated during World War II, died March 14 of senile dementia at Church Home. The Stevenson resident was 78.Mr. Myers, who began his advertising career as an office boy at 16 when he went to work for the Mahool Advertising Agency, retired as vice president of Emory Advertising in 1984.He merged Mahool in 1961 with Peter Torrieri Advertising to create Torrieri-Myers Advertising, and was president of the combined firm until 1982, when it was merged into Emory Advertising.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | November 29, 2013
Whether it's called the David Bachrach House or the Gertrude Stein House makes no difference to me. This Reservoir Hill landmark, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, has finally achieved a striking, permanent restoration. It languished in ruins for decades and faced a dubious future, despite its remarkable pedigree. Just this month, its final group of new residents moved into what has re-emerged as a Linden Avenue Victorian showcase, a charming reminder of what would have been a breeze-filled suburban cottage surrounded by fields near Druid Hill Park.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
Calman A. Levin, who founded a law firm and represented the estate of writer Gertrude Stein, died Thursday of a heart attack at his Village of Cross Keys home. He was 73. In 1958, along with partners Stanford G. Gann Sr. and Robert M. Hankin, he founded the firm of Levin, Gann and Hankin, later Levin & Gann. He practiced in the tower of the former Maryland National Bank Building at Baltimore and Light streets. Mr. Levin specialized in estate planning and administration and remained active in the practice until his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1999
Gertrude Stein(1874-1946)Stein, who studied medicine at Johns Hopkins, had such influential opinions on art and literature that she had the power to build or ruin reputations. She was one of the first admirers of Cubists and other experimenters like Pablo Picasso, who painted her portrait."Three Lives," Stein's first published book, has been hailed as a minor masterpiece. Later, Stein wrote about American soldiers in France with "Brewsie and Willie."Stein also wrote an autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, which is in actuality her own autobiography.
NEWS
By TESS LEWIS and TESS LEWIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 1997
"The Letters of Gertrude Stein and Thornton Wilder," edited by Edward M. Burns and Ulla E. Dydo with William Rice. Yale University Press. 436 pages. $35.It would be difficult to find two authors whose works diverge more in style and structure than Thornton Wilder and Gertrude Stein. Wilder's limpid, engaging prose and accessible story lines often mask his works' depth and critics too easily dismiss him as a popularizer of great ideas. Gertrude Stein assembled streams of laborious, repetitive sentences into lengthy meditations on a few recurrent themes.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 18, 2000
BEFORE PARIS, her literary life and her famous relationship with Alice B. Toklas, Gertrude Stein lived in the rowhouse at 215 E. Biddle St. with her brother, Leo. She was in the vanguard of women who attended the Johns Hopkins Medical School and called 215 E. Biddle home for about three years. I don't know offhand if Gertrude Stein had tomato plants in the rear yard, but it seems unlikely such a thing would have been considered an offense in late 19th-century Baltimore. Today a tomato plant behind Gertrude Stein's house could get you a $50 fine.
FEATURES
By Judith Wynn and Judith Wynn,Special to The Sun | May 17, 1994
Don't turn to "Six Exceptional Women" for inspiring success stories. Three of the women in this odd, meandering memoir -- writer Gertrude Stein, her companion Alice B. Toklas, and film actress Arletty ("The French Garbo") -- won artistic fame in pre-World War II Europe. The other three subjects, which include the author's mother, were wealthy heiresses with artistic interests.All six women knew author James Lord. All of them met sad and (except for Stein) lonely, embittered ends.James Lord grew up in Indiana and moved to Europe after serving with U.S. military intelligence in France during World War II. He won the French Legion D'Honneur in 1988 for his work to preserve Cezanne's studio.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 6, 1995
Andy Warhol may be one of the great immortals of modern art, but not because of his penetrating insight into the depths of the human soul. You can tell that by looking at his portraits. They are not his best work.Nevertheless, Warhol is so astonishingly famous that any mention of his name arouses curiosity. So the Jewish Community Center's current "Andy Warhol: Ten Portraits of Jews of the 20th Century" may be packing 'em in. And it has some virtues.In the 1980s, Warhol and New York art dealer Ronald Feldman hatched the idea for a series of silkscreen portraits of Jewish leaders of various professions.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2012
Julian Samuel Stein Jr., a retired public relations executive who was an adviser to Gov. J. Millard Tawes, died June 22 of heart failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Tuscany-Canterbury resident was 93. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Stein was the son of a partner in the investment banking firm of Stein Bros. & Boyce and a homemaker. He spent his early years in Windsor Hills and later moved with his family to Rose Hill, a 65-acre farm in Pikesville. Mr. Stein was a 1937 graduate of the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn., and earned a bachelor's degree in 1941 from Harvard University.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN REPORTER | September 24, 2005
With Baltimore celebrating its annual book festival beneath the Washington Monument in historic Mount Vernon, it's a great weekend to get out and see some of the landmarks of the city's long, rich and occasionally quirky literary history. Just strolling around the square, you can see lots of them, including the incomparable Peabody Library, the brownstone where H.L. Mencken lived, a hotel where F. Scott Fitzgerald drank gin rickeys and the spot where his namesake, Francis Scott Key, died.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
Calman A. Levin, who founded a law firm and represented the estate of writer Gertrude Stein, died Thursday of a heart attack at his Village of Cross Keys home. He was 73. In 1958, along with partners Stanford G. Gann Sr. and Robert M. Hankin, he founded the firm of Levin, Gann and Hankin, later Levin & Gann. He practiced in the tower of the former Maryland National Bank Building at Baltimore and Light streets. Mr. Levin specialized in estate planning and administration and remained active in the practice until his death.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 18, 2000
BEFORE PARIS, her literary life and her famous relationship with Alice B. Toklas, Gertrude Stein lived in the rowhouse at 215 E. Biddle St. with her brother, Leo. She was in the vanguard of women who attended the Johns Hopkins Medical School and called 215 E. Biddle home for about three years. I don't know offhand if Gertrude Stein had tomato plants in the rear yard, but it seems unlikely such a thing would have been considered an offense in late 19th-century Baltimore. Today a tomato plant behind Gertrude Stein's house could get you a $50 fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1999
Gertrude Stein(1874-1946)Stein, who studied medicine at Johns Hopkins, had such influential opinions on art and literature that she had the power to build or ruin reputations. She was one of the first admirers of Cubists and other experimenters like Pablo Picasso, who painted her portrait."Three Lives," Stein's first published book, has been hailed as a minor masterpiece. Later, Stein wrote about American soldiers in France with "Brewsie and Willie."Stein also wrote an autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, which is in actuality her own autobiography.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF Library researcher Dee Lyon assisted with this article | May 30, 1998
Robert L. Berney, founder and president of a travel agency and an art enthusiast who wrote and lectured on Baltimore's legendary Cone sisters, died Thursday at Sinai Hospital from complications of a fall. The Owings Mills resident was 81.Mr. Berney was a great-nephew of the art-collecting Cone sisters and a great-great-grandson of Isaac Hamburger, who founded the Isaac Hamburger & Sons menswear business in 1850.He began his working career as a salesman in the late 1930s at a Hamburger's store at Baltimore and Hanover streets.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | November 26, 1993
Sara W. "Sally" Glendinning, former Evening Sun women's page editor and feature writer with the Sarasota (Fla.) Herald-Tribune, died Nov. 17 of cancer in her home in Marietta, Ga. She was 80.Under the name Sally Wilson, Mrs. Glendinning wrote stories for the women's page from the late 1930s through 1946, serving as editor of the page during World War II."She was an excellent reporter and a good writer," said Robert B. Cochrane, former general manager of television station WMAR who was a reporter and music critic during much of Mrs. Glendinning's tenure.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 28, 1996
150 years ago in The SunJuly 28: The stealing of the wagon, belonging to the Alms House, was noticed yesterday, as having taken place on Saturday morning.Aug. 1: Indians About -- We yesterday saw traversing the streets a live Indian, followed by troops of boys. He was dressed off in a uniform with plenty of ribbons, &c. From a page in his possession, we learned that his name is Kebucco, a chief of the Kansas tribe, and that he is on his way to Washington.100 years ago in The SunJuly 28: The "emancipation" of woman and her now unchallenged right to enter the field of gainful labor has made it no longer necessary for thousands of females to look to marriage as a means of support.
NEWS
By TESS LEWIS and TESS LEWIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 5, 1997
"The Letters of Gertrude Stein and Thornton Wilder," edited by Edward M. Burns and Ulla E. Dydo with William Rice. Yale University Press. 436 pages. $35.It would be difficult to find two authors whose works diverge more in style and structure than Thornton Wilder and Gertrude Stein. Wilder's limpid, engaging prose and accessible story lines often mask his works' depth and critics too easily dismiss him as a popularizer of great ideas. Gertrude Stein assembled streams of laborious, repetitive sentences into lengthy meditations on a few recurrent themes.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 28, 1996
150 years ago in The SunJuly 28: The stealing of the wagon, belonging to the Alms House, was noticed yesterday, as having taken place on Saturday morning.Aug. 1: Indians About -- We yesterday saw traversing the streets a live Indian, followed by troops of boys. He was dressed off in a uniform with plenty of ribbons, &c. From a page in his possession, we learned that his name is Kebucco, a chief of the Kansas tribe, and that he is on his way to Washington.100 years ago in The SunJuly 28: The "emancipation" of woman and her now unchallenged right to enter the field of gainful labor has made it no longer necessary for thousands of females to look to marriage as a means of support.
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