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NEWS
March 24, 2004
On Monday March 22, 2004 BERNARD GERSON KAPLAN, beloved husband of the late Bessye M. Kaplan (nee Meyerwitz); loving father of Ilene D. Cohen of Baltimore, MD and Ira M. Kaplan of Sandia Park, N.M.; dear father-in-law of Norman J. Cohen and Helen Kaplan; loving grandfather of Wayne Kaplan and Robin Schnell; loving great-grandfather of Skylar Kaplan. Services and Interment at Har Sinai Cemetery, Garrison Forest Rd on Wednesday March 24, at 12 noon. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to The American Cancer Society, 1599 Clifton Rd, N.E. Atlanta, GA (30329)
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NEWS
October 9, 2004
William H. Gerson, a mathematics professor at Prince George's Community College who was an anti-war activist in the 1960s, died of multiple myeloma Monday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 65 and lived in Annapolis. Mr. Gerson was born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn. He earned his bachelor's degree in engineering from Cooper Union College in 1962, and a master's degree in physics from Columbia University in 1964. While studying for his doctorate in physics at the University of Maryland, College Park in the 1960s, Mr. Gerson joined Students for a Democratic Society.
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NEWS
October 9, 2004
William H. Gerson, a mathematics professor at Prince George's Community College who was an anti-war activist in the 1960s, died of multiple myeloma Monday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 65 and lived in Annapolis. Mr. Gerson was born in New York City and raised in Brooklyn. He earned his bachelor's degree in engineering from Cooper Union College in 1962, and a master's degree in physics from Columbia University in 1964. While studying for his doctorate in physics at the University of Maryland, College Park in the 1960s, Mr. Gerson joined Students for a Democratic Society.
NEWS
March 24, 2004
On Monday March 22, 2004 BERNARD GERSON KAPLAN, beloved husband of the late Bessye M. Kaplan (nee Meyerwitz); loving father of Ilene D. Cohen of Baltimore, MD and Ira M. Kaplan of Sandia Park, N.M.; dear father-in-law of Norman J. Cohen and Helen Kaplan; loving grandfather of Wayne Kaplan and Robin Schnell; loving great-grandfather of Skylar Kaplan. Services and Interment at Har Sinai Cemetery, Garrison Forest Rd on Wednesday March 24, at 12 noon. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to The American Cancer Society, 1599 Clifton Rd, N.E. Atlanta, GA (30329)
NEWS
September 19, 2002
Dr. Gerson A. Freedman, a retired Northwest Baltimore dentist, died Tuesday of stroke complications at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 89. Before he retired about 18 years ago, Dr. Freedman practiced at a home office in the 6700 block of Park Heights Ave. and in the heart of Pikesville. He also taught diagnosis at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. Born in Baltimore and raised on Pinkney Road, he was a 1930 City College graduate. He earned a degree from the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, and did postgraduate work at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1999
Gerson Gutman Eisenberg, a writer and longtime supporter of Maryland history and arts, died yesterday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a lengthy illness. He was 90 and lived in Pikesville.Mr. Eisenberg served on many boards and donated money to intellectual and artistic causes. He also wrote books on travel and history, and created an audiotaped, self-guided tour of Baltimore in 1969 -- a first for any U.S. city.He was born in Baltimore, the son of Abram Eisenberg, the owner of Eisenberg's Underselling store on Lexington Street.
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
To Gerson F. Kroiz, nothing was more important than family. In the summer of 1978, Mr. Kroiz made headlines by kidnapping his three children in the midst of a custody dispute because he feared he would lose them. He died Friday at age 60 of pancreatic cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Mr. Kroiz was one of the first people arrested under Maryland's law to prevent feuding parents from abducting children. The law went into effect July 1, 1978. He later established a cordial relationship with his ex-wife.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 12, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The words of President Bush can often be traced to a coffee shop. It's a Starbucks -- a block from the White House -- that serves as a second office, of sorts, for the president's chief speechwriter, Michael Gerson, who often stakes out a table and scrawls soon-to-be presidential policy on a notepad. His office in the basement of the White House can become claustrophobic, Gerson says, and the bustle of customers and whir of coffee-grinding machines help him concentrate. So far, no one in the administration is questioning that work habit.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | April 26, 1992
A memorial program at the Naval Academy tonight will remind listeners that the effects of the Holocaust continue to reach beyond those who died.The featured speaker, a 1961 Academy graduate, exemplifiesthe consequences of the Holocaust for many of the living, said RabbiAlbert Slomovitz, a chaplain at the academy.Ben Gerson, who works with Merrill Lynch in Washington, was born in Germany in 1937. As a 3-year-old, he and his 5-year-old sister were sent to live with a Christian family in Belgium.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
It's a 1960s story, all right: middle-class white girl from Republican Silver Spring home registers at University of Chicago, breathes the same air as the radical Weathermen, does a few anti-war marches, reads a little Marx. Before long, the world looks different."It was really mind-opening for me," says Carol Gerson of Annapolis, honored recently at the fifth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Dinner for her community activism. "There were always lots of debates late into the night. I found that really exhilarating.
NEWS
July 14, 2003
Benny Carter, 95, a master of melodic invention on the alto saxophone who also was a renowned jazz composer, instrumentalist, orchestra leader and arranger, died Saturday after being hospitalized for about two weeks with bronchitis, family friend and publicist Virginia Wicks said yesterday. Mr. Carter was largely self-taught as a musician, playing both saxophone and trumpet before becoming a bandleader in the late 1920s. In a career that spanned more than six decades, he was considered among the top altoists in jazz.
NEWS
September 19, 2002
Dr. Gerson A. Freedman, a retired Northwest Baltimore dentist, died Tuesday of stroke complications at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 89. Before he retired about 18 years ago, Dr. Freedman practiced at a home office in the 6700 block of Park Heights Ave. and in the heart of Pikesville. He also taught diagnosis at the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. Born in Baltimore and raised on Pinkney Road, he was a 1930 City College graduate. He earned a degree from the University of Maryland School of Dentistry, and did postgraduate work at Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 12, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The words of President Bush can often be traced to a coffee shop. It's a Starbucks -- a block from the White House -- that serves as a second office, of sorts, for the president's chief speechwriter, Michael Gerson, who often stakes out a table and scrawls soon-to-be presidential policy on a notepad. His office in the basement of the White House can become claustrophobic, Gerson says, and the bustle of customers and whir of coffee-grinding machines help him concentrate. So far, no one in the administration is questioning that work habit.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | July 9, 2000
Behind the security fence, Gerson Polun walks the grounds, moving from an area of waist-high weeds back to the barren center of the property and then toward its rear, where a rusting, green tin overhang sits waiting for its ultimate demise. A gnarled Maryland license plate - with its '89 sticker still able to reflect the noon sun - lies in the dirt. It's the same dirt, just off the Canton waterfront, where a few years ago tractor-trailers off Interstate 95 used to park, and where a barrel factory stood for a generation before that.
NEWS
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
To Gerson F. Kroiz, nothing was more important than family. In the summer of 1978, Mr. Kroiz made headlines by kidnapping his three children in the midst of a custody dispute because he feared he would lose them. He died Friday at age 60 of pancreatic cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Mr. Kroiz was one of the first people arrested under Maryland's law to prevent feuding parents from abducting children. The law went into effect July 1, 1978. He later established a cordial relationship with his ex-wife.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1999
Gerson Gutman Eisenberg, a writer and longtime supporter of Maryland history and arts, died yesterday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a lengthy illness. He was 90 and lived in Pikesville.Mr. Eisenberg served on many boards and donated money to intellectual and artistic causes. He also wrote books on travel and history, and created an audiotaped, self-guided tour of Baltimore in 1969 -- a first for any U.S. city.He was born in Baltimore, the son of Abram Eisenberg, the owner of Eisenberg's Underselling store on Lexington Street.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 1, 1998
The holiday that most American Jews celebrate is, unquestionably, Passover. The celebration that begins April 10 is also the one that brings out the most hand-me-down recipes. It is a time to remember ancient sagas - the deliverance of the Israelites from bondage in Egypt - and also a moment to recall personal family sagas. What better way to remember these stories than to weave them with the foods of one's family and culinary traditions of one's people?A contemporary effort at doing this is found in the recent book, "The Tomarkin Story," by Joanne Gerson, an artist living in Cincinnati, Ohio.
NEWS
July 14, 2003
Benny Carter, 95, a master of melodic invention on the alto saxophone who also was a renowned jazz composer, instrumentalist, orchestra leader and arranger, died Saturday after being hospitalized for about two weeks with bronchitis, family friend and publicist Virginia Wicks said yesterday. Mr. Carter was largely self-taught as a musician, playing both saxophone and trumpet before becoming a bandleader in the late 1920s. In a career that spanned more than six decades, he was considered among the top altoists in jazz.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 1, 1998
The holiday that most American Jews celebrate is, unquestionably, Passover. The celebration that begins April 10 is also the one that brings out the most hand-me-down recipes. It is a time to remember ancient sagas - the deliverance of the Israelites from bondage in Egypt - and also a moment to recall personal family sagas. What better way to remember these stories than to weave them with the foods of one's family and culinary traditions of one's people?A contemporary effort at doing this is found in the recent book, "The Tomarkin Story," by Joanne Gerson, an artist living in Cincinnati, Ohio.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | February 28, 1993
It's a 1960s story, all right: middle-class white girl from Republican Silver Spring home registers at University of Chicago, breathes the same air as the radical Weathermen, does a few anti-war marches, reads a little Marx. Before long, the world looks different."It was really mind-opening for me," says Carol Gerson of Annapolis, honored recently at the fifth annual Martin Luther King Jr. Dinner for her community activism. "There were always lots of debates late into the night. I found that really exhilarating.
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