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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Before the Johns Hopkins University president gives 1,300 graduating students their congratulatory handshake on Thursday, volunteers will give them a cautionary dollop of hand sanitizer. "What can I say? We're a health-conscious university," said Dennis O'Shea, spokesman for Hopkins. Since the influenza epidemic of 2009, gel disinfectant has been spreading around schools like strep on throats. Yet there's little scientific evidence that harmful bacteria are passed through a casual squeeze of the hands during commencement.
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BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | September 21, 2012
Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler has reached a settlement with California-based CleanWell Company and OhSo Clean Inc, the makers of a hand sanitizer that claimed it was "proven to kill 99.99 percent of germs that can make you sick. " Gansler's investigation revealed no actual proof that those statements were true. CleanWell must pay $100,000 in penalties and costs, and will no longer be allowed to assert that its hand sanitizer can prevent disease or infection. “Companies that make unsubstantiated claims about their products deceive consumers into spending their hard-earned money on something that may not live up to its billing,” Gansler said in a statement.
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FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | January 10, 2008
I have a 3-year-old and am expecting a new baby in a few weeks. I hate to use harsh chemicals to clean our house and usually rely on good old soap and hot water, sometimes with vinegar or baking soda. I use bleach or Bon Ami sparingly for some things. I found a recipe for a home cleaner spray -- a simple mixture of white vinegar, water and a few drops of essential oil for fragrance. I spray this mixture everywhere, confident that I could eat it if I had to. It does a great job on the stainless kitchen sink, microwave, countertops and bathroom sink.
HEALTH
By Bailey Shiffler, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Back to school can also mean back to germs, breaks, sprains and concussions. While most of us know kids need a good night's sleep and a good breakfast, just what exactly do experts define as "good"? And what other basics should parents put on their checklist to ensure a more healthful year ahead? Here are a dozen rules to help you help your kids better prevent schoolhouse maladies. 1. A recipe for a good day. It's easy to pop your late-waking, picky eater in the car with a box of dry cereal or a toasted plain bagel for the drive to school.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON, AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE GRAEDON, AND TERESA GRAEDON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 1999
Q. I am appalled at the condition of the public restroom where I work. It is filthy, and I hate to get close to the toilet seats. I have osteoarthritis in my knees, so crouching above the toilet is very difficult.How effective are disposable seat covers? I have seen them in the pharmacy, but I don't know if they can really protect me from germs.A.Toilet seat covers are a good investment if they make you feel more comfortable and keep you from crouching. Research has shown that women who hover over toilets instead of sitting down are less likely to empty their bladders completely and may be more vulnerable to urinary infections or incontinence.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 12, 1999
GERMS BEWARE. Pupils and staff at Oklahoma Road Middle School are prepared to wage a battle.Beginning yesterday, pupils at the Eldersburg school will be offered a prepackaged hand wipe to use before eating lunch in an effort to prevent the spread of germs."
NEWS
By Julie Deardorf and Julie Deardorf,Chicago Tribune | April 6, 2007
Ohio State basketball coach Thad Matta recently shocked some germ freaks by invoking the legendary three-second rule during a game. After accidentally spitting out his chewing gum, Matta scooped it off the floor and popped it back into his mouth, explaining that it hadn't been on the ground long enough to be contaminated. But just how germy was that sticky gum? And was Matta better off because he picked up his gum in three seconds rather than five? Researchers who have actually looked into the three- to five-second rule say, "Nope, sorry."
NEWS
By NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2003
Both war and peace had a role in making Americans some of the most clean-conscious people on the face of the planet. The lethality of germs was brought home during the Civil War, when three times as many soldiers died from infectious diseases as from combat. After World War II, as women returned from the factories to resume household roles, the demand for more modern home appliances increased, and vacuum cleaners and washing machines made cleanliness an end in itself. Today antibacterials - germ-fighting compounds - are in products as wide-ranging as sponges, children's toys, mattresses and pantyhose.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 28, 1998
MANASSAS, Va. -- The vials of bubonic plague, anthrax and yellow fever sat in squat stainless steel vats, frozen in liquid nitrogen and padlocked in a truck that said "Office Movers." The germs whizzed down the Washington Beltway, trekking quietly through miles of suburbs where an unknowing public slept soundly.At the state line, Maryland state troopers handed off the convoy to Virginia, and a hazardous-materials team and a back-up truck rode alongside. It was a caravan of some of the world's most frightening germs, cruising around the capital city under a full moon on Friday the 13th.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - To help protect against the threat of bioterrorism, the Bush administration today will start deploying a national system of environmental monitors that is intended to tell within 24 hours whether anthrax, smallpox and other deadly germs have been released into the air, senior administration officials said yesterday. The system uses sophisticated data analysis that officials said had been quietly adapted since the Sept. 11 attacks and tested over the past nine months. It will be adapted to many of the Environmental Protection Agency's 3,000 air quality monitoring stations throughout the country to register unusual quantities of a wide range of pathogens that cause diseases which incapacitate and kill.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
In the 1880s Louis Pasteur studied germs and encouraged doctors to sanitize their hands and equipment before surgery. Prior to this, few practiced the procedure. A lack of understanding of germs and bacteria led to the spread of disease that killed more Civil War soldiers than enemy bullets during the entire war. Over 100,000 die in the U.S. yearly because doctors and nurses do not wash their hands. What have we learned? If we washed our hands, we might not end up as a statistic.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Before the Johns Hopkins University president gives 1,300 graduating students their congratulatory handshake on Thursday, volunteers will give them a cautionary dollop of hand sanitizer. "What can I say? We're a health-conscious university," said Dennis O'Shea, spokesman for Hopkins. Since the influenza epidemic of 2009, gel disinfectant has been spreading around schools like strep on throats. Yet there's little scientific evidence that harmful bacteria are passed through a casual squeeze of the hands during commencement.
NEWS
By Kenneth King | February 28, 2011
Frederick residents have had plenty of reminders lately why they should be concerned about the biodefense facilities in their midst: an ongoing cancer cluster investigation related to past groundwater contamination, an Agent Orange protest, and headlines about the 2001 anthrax attacks — which the FBI still insists were perpetrated by a researcher at Fort Detrick's U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). Little wonder, then, if Frederick residents are troubled about the latest risky biodefense facility at Fort Detrick: a 460,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures and Test Facility, which, it appears, will aerosolize large numbers of monkeys with bioweapons agents.
NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | May 6, 2009
IN THE MIAMI AIRPORT -Against the advice of our vice president, I have braved the germ-infested world, forced into transit by prior commitments and surrounded by strangers who may not recently have washed their hands. My own, of course, are scabbed from repeated scrubbing through all four lines of "Happy Birthday to You," which, my epidemiologist-neighbor tells me, is how long you have to keep the soap on your hands to do any good. At this writing, I am sequestered in a small partitioned area of Miami International Airport.
NEWS
January 26, 2009
Women are less able to suppress hunger Faced with their favorite foods, women are less able than men to suppress their hunger, a discovery that may help explain the higher obesity rate for females, a new study suggests. Gene-Jack Wang of Brookhaven National Laboratory and his colleagues were trying to figure out why some people overeat and gain weight while others don't. They performed brain scans on 13 women and 10 men who had fasted overnight to determine how their brains responded to the sight of their favorite foods.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun Reporter | May 13, 2008
The race for the White House is dirty business. Really. The campaign season that continues today with the West Virginia primary has been especially long, particularly for Democratic Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton -- a physical endurance test that includes thousands of germy handshakes, greasy chicken dinners, long hours and heavy reliance on the vocal cords. This is also the era of YouTube and 24-hour news channels to document every grimace, hacking cough and mental slip-up, and a time when baby boomers and young new voters expect their candidates to be pictures of agelessness, as many of them envision themselves.
NEWS
By Peg Adamarczyk and Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1999
ONE OF the great joys of being a grandparent is baby-sitting. Loving, hugging, playing, feeding and changing for a set period of time is infinitely easier than being the one in charge on a daily, round-the-clock basis.One of the pitfalls is being exposed to a new round of kid germs. Who knew that lying beneath the surface of my little grandson's smiles -- and sneezes and running nose -- was a mixture of germ warfare so potent that it could put his grandma out of commission for three days.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2005
With more and more workers gulping down coffee and lunch -- sometimes even dinner -- at their keyboards, tens of thousands of germs can be found in nearly every corner of the office. They are lurking beneath the papers and files, on top of keyboards and computer mice and on telephones. One study found that the office desk has more bacteria on it than the average toilet. "The biggest revelation is that there is the awareness from the worker ... that office cleanliness is maybe not where it should be," said Gary Bauer, vice president of business services for janitorial services company ServiceMaster Clean.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2008
Vapotherm Inc. is waging a comeback after revenue at the Stevensville respiratory device maker disappeared two years ago. The company's only product, an innovative machine that heats and moistens air to help patients breathe better, was still gaining market share during the summer of 2005 when disaster struck. Its device was in more than 900 hospitals and the eight-year-old company was about to reach the break-even point. That's when Kevin Thibodeau, executive vice president and chief marketing officer, was calling on a hospital in California and a message from a Vapotherm distributor flashed on his BlackBerry: One Pennsylvania hospital had reported that a Vapotherm machine had become contaminated with a bacterium called Ralstonia.
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