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German Reunification

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NEWS
By Tass, the Soviet News Agency | October 30, 1990
GERMANY'S unification was approved by the entire world community. It meant the recognition of the German people's will, the triumph of justice and common sense.German reunification did not promise to be easy and painless, as the states were based on completely different social and economic structures.Actual politics, however, while not questioning the appropriateness of this reconciliation, negatively affect its prospects. Parliamentary secretaries of all the groups in the FRG Bundestag decided to deny the status of a parliamentary group to 24 deputies of the Party of Democratic Socialism.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | October 22, 2000
"Too Far Afield," by Gunter Grass. Harcourt. 658 pages. $30. The Nobel Prize awarded last year to Gunter Grass seems one of the better literary decisions of those Swedish Academicians. From "The Tin Drum" on, his novels have been meditations on his native Germany, cast in a mode somewhere between symbolism and allegory. Like Germany itself, he prefers other things to realism. Grass always takes an idea and spreads a generous amount of prose on it. This time it's German reunification -- a topic on which he surely should be worth reading.
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NEWS
By CHRISTOPHER LAYNE | August 19, 1992
Taking his leave of the State Department, James A. Baker III said that the Bush administration can claim a successful foreign-policy stewardship based on its handling of: the Cold War's end; relations with the Soviet Union and its successor states; German reunification; the gulf war. In truth, the administration's foreign-policy record is one of failure, not success.To begin with, the administration found excuse after excuse to withhold assistance for Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reforms when such support might have prevented the Soviet Union's potentially catastrophic unraveling.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 19, 1998
MERSEBURG, Germany -- Since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, Lothar Drewitz has lost his job, his marriage and his hope in the future. Now, the 50-year-old engineer who once toiled for a state-owned metal firm in the rigid East German system fears he may never again find steady work in a unified Germany."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | October 22, 2000
"Too Far Afield," by Gunter Grass. Harcourt. 658 pages. $30. The Nobel Prize awarded last year to Gunter Grass seems one of the better literary decisions of those Swedish Academicians. From "The Tin Drum" on, his novels have been meditations on his native Germany, cast in a mode somewhere between symbolism and allegory. Like Germany itself, he prefers other things to realism. Grass always takes an idea and spreads a generous amount of prose on it. This time it's German reunification -- a topic on which he surely should be worth reading.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | November 9, 1994
BERLIN -- With the recession easing, employment increasing and inflation at bay, the economic wounds of German reunification are healing smoothly. Yet, five years after the Berlin Wall came down, east and west Germans seem as divided as ever, sneering at each other across a psychological gulf that isn't likely to narrow soon.Today is the anniversary of the moment the wall was opened to hordes of East Germans, a moment that symbolized the collapse of the Communist regime and reunification of East and West Germany.
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger | November 22, 1990
Early last November, Donald E. Tillman was interviewed by a television station about when the Berlin Wall might come down."I told them, 'Not in my lifetime,' " said Mr. Tillman, who is president of the German Society of Maryland.But last night, Mr. Tillman and about 200 others celebrated the opening of the Berlin Wall on Nov. 9, 1989, and gave thanks for the reunification of Germany in an ecumenical service at Zion Lutheran Church near City Hall on Baltimore's War Memorial Plaza.It was the second annual service.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 19, 1998
MERSEBURG, Germany -- Since the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, Lothar Drewitz has lost his job, his marriage and his hope in the future. Now, the 50-year-old engineer who once toiled for a state-owned metal firm in the rigid East German system fears he may never again find steady work in a unified Germany."
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | April 28, 1992
BERLIN -- Ill, tired and hoping to give his successor the chance to grow into his big shoes, Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher caught Germany off guard yesterday by quitting after 18 years in office.The world's longest-serving foreign minister, Mr. Genscher is also Germany's most popular politician. His resignation is expected to further weaken the government's attempts to come to grips with a host of domestic and foreign challenges.Mr. Genscher, 65, said he was not stepping down because of the government's problems or because of his poor health.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 15, 1990
BERLIN -- The parties of Chancellor Helmut Kohl's ruling coalition swept five of six state elections yesterday, four of them in the former territory of East Germany. The show of strength leaves Mr. Kohl the overwhelming favorite to retain the chancellor's post in national elections just seven weeks away.In addition to giving Mr. Kohl the inside track to become the first freely elected all-German chancellor in nearly 60 years, the extent of the coalition parties' victory yesterday also enabled the Kohl government to recapture a majority in the Bundesrat, the federal Parliament's upper house, whose composition is determined by the country's 16 states.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | November 9, 1994
BERLIN -- With the recession easing, employment increasing and inflation at bay, the economic wounds of German reunification are healing smoothly. Yet, five years after the Berlin Wall came down, east and west Germans seem as divided as ever, sneering at each other across a psychological gulf that isn't likely to narrow soon.Today is the anniversary of the moment the wall was opened to hordes of East Germans, a moment that symbolized the collapse of the Communist regime and reunification of East and West Germany.
NEWS
By CHRISTOPHER LAYNE | August 19, 1992
Taking his leave of the State Department, James A. Baker III said that the Bush administration can claim a successful foreign-policy stewardship based on its handling of: the Cold War's end; relations with the Soviet Union and its successor states; German reunification; the gulf war. In truth, the administration's foreign-policy record is one of failure, not success.To begin with, the administration found excuse after excuse to withhold assistance for Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's reforms when such support might have prevented the Soviet Union's potentially catastrophic unraveling.
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger | November 22, 1990
Early last November, Donald E. Tillman was interviewed by a television station about when the Berlin Wall might come down."I told them, 'Not in my lifetime,' " said Mr. Tillman, who is president of the German Society of Maryland.But last night, Mr. Tillman and about 200 others celebrated the opening of the Berlin Wall on Nov. 9, 1989, and gave thanks for the reunification of Germany in an ecumenical service at Zion Lutheran Church near City Hall on Baltimore's War Memorial Plaza.It was the second annual service.
NEWS
By Tass, the Soviet News Agency | October 30, 1990
GERMANY'S unification was approved by the entire world community. It meant the recognition of the German people's will, the triumph of justice and common sense.German reunification did not promise to be easy and painless, as the states were based on completely different social and economic structures.Actual politics, however, while not questioning the appropriateness of this reconciliation, negatively affect its prospects. Parliamentary secretaries of all the groups in the FRG Bundestag decided to deny the status of a parliamentary group to 24 deputies of the Party of Democratic Socialism.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 14, 1992
MOSCOW -- Prodded by President Boris N. Yeltsin, the Russian Constitutional Court agreed yesterday to hand back Mikhail S. Gorbachev's confiscated passport so that the former Soviet leader may attend a state funeral in Germany.It was the most encouraging sign yet that the two men have reached an understanding breaking the internationally embarrassing deadlock caused by Mr. Gorbachev's refusal to appear in a case involving the Communist Party's past.Court Chairman Valery Zokerin announced that the court's summons to Mr. Gorbachev, Soviet Communist Party general secretary from 1985 to 1991, was still in force.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 31, 1995
BERNAU, Germany -- The concrete-block factory sits abandoned on the outskirts of this eastern German town. Inside, one of the most modern machines for making circuit boards for computers and televisions lies idle.The company that owned the plant was sold by the government to a subsidiary of Veba AG, a utility giant in western Germany.Veba already controlled two companies in the western part making similar products, and it closed the plant here, saying it was losing money. The circuit-board machine is now for sale to anyone who will take it out of Germany so that it does not compete with Veba.
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