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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
When Clickner Ehrlich and William Henry Schaefer were born in Baltimore in the late 1880s, they became part of a multicultural city where German-American children were offered bilingual education at public expense, and their parents felt little pressure to jump into the melting pot. The grandfather of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and father of Comptroller William Donald Schaefer would have enjoyed advantages unthinkable to the Latin, Asian and African immigrants...
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2007
It was a celebration of Mozart and marzipan, Freud and folk dances, bratwurst and Black Forest cake. The only thing missing at McDaniel College's German-American Day? Beer. But considering the audience - hundreds of middle and high school students from Carroll and beyond - that was probably a good thing. Now in its 13th year, the event centers on German language and culture. It was started by McDaniel professor Mohamed Esa, who chairs the college's foreign language department. Esa organized the first German-American Day in 1995, after a conference about the future of German language teaching in Maryland, he said.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2007
It was a celebration of Mozart and marzipan, Freud and folk dances, bratwurst and Black Forest cake. The only thing missing at McDaniel College's German-American Day? Beer. But considering the audience - hundreds of middle and high school students from Carroll and beyond - that was probably a good thing. Now in its 13th year, the event centers on German language and culture. It was started by McDaniel professor Mohamed Esa, who chairs the college's foreign language department. Esa organized the first German-American Day in 1995, after a conference about the future of German language teaching in Maryland, he said.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
The current controversy over hordes of Hispanics coming over the border singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" in Spanish is only the latest rise of a tide that ebbs and flows in the United States at regular intervals. The debate over whether those who come from "out there" to "in here" are to be welcomed or repelled illustrates a paradox at the heart of this national enterprise - at once America is a country of immigrants and a country threatened by immigrants. "There is nothing new about the issue of immigration becoming a hot political topic," says Gary Gerstle, a historian at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine, but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties, and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
Harford Christian School senior Amanda Seymour says that she can identify a German accent pretty easily these days. That's because she's had a lot of practice. "I can usually tell if someone has a German accent," said Seymour, who has been studying the German language since she was in the ninth grade. "I let them know that I've been taking German at school." When she strikes up a conversation with natives of Germany, she winds up inviting them to the school's annual Kaffee und Kuchen ("coffee and cake")
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1999
Mohamed Esa fights for Germany once a week at William Winchester Elementary school in Westminster.The German professor at Western Maryland College lurched into action after he thought he was detecting a trend: Young children rarely learned foreign languages or about foreign cultures. And when they did, Esa believed, it was never, ever German."Schools, whenever they start anything new," he said, "they always think of Spanish or French."Well, puff went that trend at William Winchester.In November, with the blessing of parents and school administrators, Esa launched a "German Enrichment Program."
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
The current controversy over hordes of Hispanics coming over the border singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" in Spanish is only the latest rise of a tide that ebbs and flows in the United States at regular intervals. The debate over whether those who come from "out there" to "in here" are to be welcomed or repelled illustrates a paradox at the heart of this national enterprise - at once America is a country of immigrants and a country threatened by immigrants. "There is nothing new about the issue of immigration becoming a hot political topic," says Gary Gerstle, a historian at the University of Maryland, College Park.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | November 16, 2008
I might have to consider staying longer on the continent, especially after the discovery that they serve beer at McDonald's restaurants in some foreign countries. In particular, this revelation has given me a new appreciation for the French culture. If that isn't enough, I boarded an AirBerlin flight on Thursday and the flight attendants were handing out free copies of Playboy, which caused me to spontaneously blurt out, "What a country!" Unfortunately, it was the German language version of Playboy, so it was useless to me. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2004
When Clickner Ehrlich and William Henry Schaefer were born in Baltimore in the late 1880s, they became part of a multicultural city where German-American children were offered bilingual education at public expense, and their parents felt little pressure to jump into the melting pot. The grandfather of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and father of Comptroller William Donald Schaefer would have enjoyed advantages unthinkable to the Latin, Asian and African immigrants...
NEWS
By Amanda Angel and Amanda Angel,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2003
Harford Christian School senior Amanda Seymour says that she can identify a German accent pretty easily these days. That's because she's had a lot of practice. "I can usually tell if someone has a German accent," said Seymour, who has been studying the German language since she was in the ninth grade. "I let them know that I've been taking German at school." When she strikes up a conversation with natives of Germany, she winds up inviting them to the school's annual Kaffee und Kuchen ("coffee and cake")
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1999
Mohamed Esa fights for Germany once a week at William Winchester Elementary school in Westminster.The German professor at Western Maryland College lurched into action after he thought he was detecting a trend: Young children rarely learned foreign languages or about foreign cultures. And when they did, Esa believed, it was never, ever German."Schools, whenever they start anything new," he said, "they always think of Spanish or French."Well, puff went that trend at William Winchester.In November, with the blessing of parents and school administrators, Esa launched a "German Enrichment Program."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine, but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties, and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
September 6, 1991
Registration for Deutsche Sprachschule -- the German language school -- of Zion Lutheran Church will be 10 a.m. to noon tomorrow at the church, at 400 E. Lexington St. Classes begin Sept. 14.The school offers four classes for children and four for adults. Children as young as age 4 can begin learning through games, songs and verses. The most advanced classes will be entirely in German.Adult classes start with a basic course. More complex classes are offered to adults more fluent in German.
NEWS
August 30, 1993
SCHOOL bells are ringing again around the country.According to figures from the National Center for Education Statistics, 48.9 million children, from kindergarten to high school, will be attending class in both public and private schools across the nation in the new school year.* * * TOO MUCH bad news, you say? It's an old complaint against the media. But now comes word of a new Swiss magazine that plans a remedy for gloom and doom. According to a Reuter report, the magazine plans to look at the bright side of life and report only positive news.
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