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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2000
BERLIN -- Violetta Botwinikova is a new-wave Berliner, a 24-year-old beautician, Moscow-born, Jewish -- and very much at home in her adoptive land, where her people were destroyed about 65 years ago. "I came to Germany in 1990 because my family could stay here, simple as that," she said. "I cannot live in Israel. I need a European lifestyle." After a decade here, Botwinikova, a beautician, speaks German easily. She is proud to be a Jew, she says, and comfortable in a Germany that has given her freedom and money.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Liliana C. "Lilly" Shepard, a Holocaust survivor who chronicled her experiences being trapped in the Warsaw Ghetto with other Jews in a 1980 book, died April 7 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 85. The daughter of an engineer and a homemaker, Liliana Cukier was born and raised in Kalisz, Poland. Her formal education ended when the Nazis invaded her homeland in 1939. "Then came September 1, 1939, the date Poland and the world will never forget.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Liliana C. "Lilly" Shepard, a Holocaust survivor who chronicled her experiences being trapped in the Warsaw Ghetto with other Jews in a 1980 book, died April 7 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 85. The daughter of an engineer and a homemaker, Liliana Cukier was born and raised in Kalisz, Poland. Her formal education ended when the Nazis invaded her homeland in 1939. "Then came September 1, 1939, the date Poland and the world will never forget.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2000
BERLIN -- Violetta Botwinikova is a new-wave Berliner, a 24-year-old beautician, Moscow-born, Jewish -- and very much at home in her adoptive land, where her people were destroyed about 65 years ago. "I came to Germany in 1990 because my family could stay here, simple as that," she said. "I cannot live in Israel. I need a European lifestyle." After a decade here, Botwinikova, a beautician, speaks German easily. She is proud to be a Jew, she says, and comfortable in a Germany that has given her freedom and money.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 21, 1999
BERLIN -- The building is empty, and still they come, 10,000 people a month, embarking on a silent pilgrimage into a nation's soul.They tread through disorienting corridors that weave this way and that. One stairwell is topped with light and seeming life. Another path leads to symbolic exile, a jagged garden of concrete pillars shrouded with oak willows. And over there, the heavy door is moved, and the Holocaust Tower is entered, with its deathly chill and darkness countered by a shaft of sunlight.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 6, 1994
This D-Day story begins six years before the Normandy invasion, three years before Pearl Harbor, a few days before Crystal Night in the 38th year of Eva Salomon's life. It begins in Germany, where Eva Salomon and her husband, Hermann, lived a charmed life that was swiftly losing its charm. He was a physician, the son of an affluent businessman. The Salomons were German citizens, and they were Jewish, and time was running out for Jews in Germany. By the fall of 1938, the Salomons knew they had to leave.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
When H. Mebane Turner joined the old-line Maryland Club in 1961, its ranks included only white men. African-Americans and Jews were not among those invited to be members. Times have changed at the Eager Street establishment. In the ensuing years, members found it "appropriate" to welcome minorities into the fold of the businessmen's club, said Turner, the retired president of the University of Baltimore. "They still don't take ladies, I'm afraid, except as guests," he said. In Maryland, private clubs with exclusive memberships still exist, although their influence might be waning.
NEWS
July 1, 2006
Harry Kulp, an accountant and longtime executive director of a Baltimore burial society, died of heart failure Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Randallstown resident was 76. Mr. Kulp was born in Frankfurt, Germany, and was 9 years old when he came to Baltimore with his family to escape the rise of Nazism in his homeland. Raised on Whitelock Street, he was a 1949 graduate of Polytechnic Institute and earned an accounting degree from the now-closed Baltimore Institute. Mr. Kulp, who had not retired, was the owner of an accounting business in Randallstown.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1997
Family. A visitor cannot enter Philip Kahn Jr.'s apartment on North Charles Street and ignore what family and family history mean to him and Betsey, his wife of 50 years.Portraits of Betsey Kahn's great-grandparents, Moses and namesake Betsey Wiesenfeld, hang in the living room. Exquisite, 19th-century needlepoints created by ancestors in school also grace the Kahn residence, as do images of two grown daughters and a beloved granddaughter.And everywhere, photographs, school medals, religious items and commercial mementos, including an old lint brush, chronicle the Kahn and Wiesenfeld families, both of which helped to build Baltimore's once-flourishing garment industry.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
James W. Dale makes a welcome point in his commentary about the divestment campaign against Israel ("Choosing to stay engaged: Anti-Israel measures like divestment are not the best way to seek justice for Palestinians," May 4). It is, as he says, vital that mainline churches, including his own Presbyterian Church, understand that anti-Israel "divestment" campaigns render their proponents destructive and deny them a voice at the table. "Divestment" echoes both the Nazi boycott and impoverishment of German Jews and the Arab League's economic boycott of Israel.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 21, 1999
BERLIN -- The building is empty, and still they come, 10,000 people a month, embarking on a silent pilgrimage into a nation's soul.They tread through disorienting corridors that weave this way and that. One stairwell is topped with light and seeming life. Another path leads to symbolic exile, a jagged garden of concrete pillars shrouded with oak willows. And over there, the heavy door is moved, and the Holocaust Tower is entered, with its deathly chill and darkness countered by a shaft of sunlight.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 6, 1994
This D-Day story begins six years before the Normandy invasion, three years before Pearl Harbor, a few days before Crystal Night in the 38th year of Eva Salomon's life. It begins in Germany, where Eva Salomon and her husband, Hermann, lived a charmed life that was swiftly losing its charm. He was a physician, the son of an affluent businessman. The Salomons were German citizens, and they were Jewish, and time was running out for Jews in Germany. By the fall of 1938, the Salomons knew they had to leave.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | April 1, 2003
Nine days ago, Nowhere in Africa won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film. Tonight it's the attraction at the William and Irene Weinberg Family Baltimore Jewish Film Festival. Writer-director Caroline Link's adaptation of Stefanie Zweig's autobiographical novel is exotic - in a good way. Even when the countryside is arid, Link imbues with an enigmatic luster this tale of German Jews who ship out to Africa to escape the Third Reich. The British-controlled Kenya of this movie, a magnificent land with a proud, mystical people, is never too easy to know - it forces Europeans to face themselves and forge new destinies.
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