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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2001
BERLIN -- In a zinc-clad building shaped like a lightning bolt and aimed at a country's conscience, remnants of 2,000 years of Jewish history in Germany were displayed last night with the opening of the Jewish Museum Berlin. Reminding Germans of what they lost in the city where the Nazis launched their attempt to destroy European Jewry, the museum was inaugurated not as a Holocaust memorial, but as a center of teaching and learning about a people's life, times and culture. Even while the building stood as an empty shell after its completion in 1999, hundreds of thousands of people visited the structure, which has been acclaimed as a masterpiece and was designed by Polish-born American architect Daniel Libeskind.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 10, 2001
BERLIN -- In a zinc-clad building shaped like a lightning bolt and aimed at a country's conscience, remnants of 2,000 years of Jewish history in Germany were displayed last night with the opening of the Jewish Museum Berlin. Reminding Germans of what they lost in the city where the Nazis launched their attempt to destroy European Jewry, the museum was inaugurated not as a Holocaust memorial, but as a center of teaching and learning about a people's life, times and culture. Even while the building stood as an empty shell after its completion in 1999, hundreds of thousands of people visited the structure, which has been acclaimed as a masterpiece and was designed by Polish-born American architect Daniel Libeskind.
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NEWS
By George F. Will | April 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Business is brisk at the Holocaust Memorial Museum here. Visitors line up more than two hours before the doors open at 10 a.m., and about 2 million pass through those doors each year, four times more than were anticipated when the museum opened three years ago.Explaining the museum's success, a member of the staff says dryly, "Human nature has been an enormous help."She means that from Bosnia, where scores of mass graves are being explored, to Rwanda, from Angola to Kurdish regions of Iraq, from Liberia to Sri Lanka, headlines proclaim the continuing prevalence of what visitors hope the museum will help them comprehend: beastliness.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine, but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 17, 1991
BERLIN -- Antje Pieper is bewildered by a bitter division in her reunited country."Sometimes I think that we Germans try to make everything difficult for ourselves. We unified the country peacefully, but now are killing ourselves over where the government should be. It's ridiculous," she said.For Ms. Pieper, 26, a bookkeeper, the question of where unified Germany should locate its government is clear: Berlin. But for the 656 members of parliament who have to make the decision Thursday, the question is being treated as the most controversial decision of their careers.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1990
BERLIN -- United Germany held yesterday its first parliamentary session at the Reichstag since the 1933 fire that once destroyed democracy here, with political party leaders pledging to overcome Germany's brief, troubled history as a united country.Though yesterday's speeches held no shortage of infighting over the details of unification, party leaders appeared impressed with the enormous challenge of the work ahead of them and called for solidarity in tackling the job.Chancellor Helmut Kohl said his government would be "marked by an awareness of German history in all its aspects."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 29, 1993
BERLIN -- An ugly, two-story border tower from which East German agents surveyed and controlled the tense Checkpoint Charlie crossing, a building that once stood at the very center of world politics, is now on the collector's market.What's more, it's free to the right bidder.As recently as five years ago, this tower posed the final barrier for anyone seeking to come west through Checkpoint Charlie, Berlin's best-known crossing."The Berlin Wall was the center of the division of the world, and Checkpoint Charlie was at the center of the wall," said Rainer Hildebrandt, director of the Checkpoint Charlie Museum, which owns the tower.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine, but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties, and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Imre Karacs | August 1, 1999
GERMANS are at odds over claims that harsh potty training is to blame both for Nazism and modern thuggery.A friend of mine is convinced that the German national character in all its complexities can be traced back to Germans' rigorous potty training.Teutonic infants, he claims, are made to sit on their lowly thrones for hours on end, until pronounced spiffy clean, usually at a remarkably tender age.Out of this early purgatory of life emerges a nation of precision engineers obsessed with waste disposal, with an unquenchable yearning for order and authority.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties, and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By George F. Will | April 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Business is brisk at the Holocaust Memorial Museum here. Visitors line up more than two hours before the doors open at 10 a.m., and about 2 million pass through those doors each year, four times more than were anticipated when the museum opened three years ago.Explaining the museum's success, a member of the staff says dryly, "Human nature has been an enormous help."She means that from Bosnia, where scores of mass graves are being explored, to Rwanda, from Angola to Kurdish regions of Iraq, from Liberia to Sri Lanka, headlines proclaim the continuing prevalence of what visitors hope the museum will help them comprehend: beastliness.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 29, 1993
BERLIN -- An ugly, two-story border tower from which East German agents surveyed and controlled the tense Checkpoint Charlie crossing, a building that once stood at the very center of world politics, is now on the collector's market.What's more, it's free to the right bidder.As recently as five years ago, this tower posed the final barrier for anyone seeking to come west through Checkpoint Charlie, Berlin's best-known crossing."The Berlin Wall was the center of the division of the world, and Checkpoint Charlie was at the center of the wall," said Rainer Hildebrandt, director of the Checkpoint Charlie Museum, which owns the tower.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 17, 1991
BERLIN -- Antje Pieper is bewildered by a bitter division in her reunited country."Sometimes I think that we Germans try to make everything difficult for ourselves. We unified the country peacefully, but now are killing ourselves over where the government should be. It's ridiculous," she said.For Ms. Pieper, 26, a bookkeeper, the question of where unified Germany should locate its government is clear: Berlin. But for the 656 members of parliament who have to make the decision Thursday, the question is being treated as the most controversial decision of their careers.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 5, 1990
BERLIN -- United Germany held yesterday its first parliamentary session at the Reichstag since the 1933 fire that once destroyed democracy here, with political party leaders pledging to overcome Germany's brief, troubled history as a united country.Though yesterday's speeches held no shortage of infighting over the details of unification, party leaders appeared impressed with the enormous challenge of the work ahead of them and called for solidarity in tackling the job.Chancellor Helmut Kohl said his government would be "marked by an awareness of German history in all its aspects."
NEWS
October 17, 2004
McDaniel College will hold its 10th German-American Day tomorrow, with nearly 900 students and teachers from public and private secondary schools throughout Maryland and Northern Virginia expected on campus for a program of German history, culture and music. The celebration begins at 9:15 a.m. with a concert by Uwe Kind, known for his language-teaching technique using music. The creator of such rap numbers as Das Auto is Kaputt will perform songs used by teachers and students to help teach conversational German.
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