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By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2002
I SUPPOSE I expected to find a group of somber women praying and listening to speeches at the recent meeting of The Christian German-American Women's Club that I attended. Was I wrong! Instead, I met a gaily dressed crowd, full of laughter - and all speaking German. Now, I don't know a word of German, but it didn't matter. Even without understanding the words, it was clear that people were having fun and doing good things at the same time. Since I began writing this column, I have included monthly notices about this club.
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By Katie V. Jones | October 20, 2012
Maggi Uhland was happy on Tuesday that she decided to pursue German at South Carroll High School. "It is a lot easier than Spanish and a lot more fun," the 14-year-old freshman said, of the language. "And we can choose to come here. " Uhland was one of more than 1,000 students from around the county, state, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C., to participate in German-American Day at McDaniel College in Westminster on Oct. 16. Now in its 18th year, the day focuses on German culture and history through workshops and lectures that discuss everything from German fairy tales and music to chilling survivors' tales of the Holocaust and anti-Hitler resistance movements during World War II. Among those was Rubin Sztajer, of Baltimore, a Polish Jew who told students of his experiences as a Holocaust survivor who endured the Warsaw Ghetto and Nazi concentration camps.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine, but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
Here's the part where you tell me how wrong (or how right!) I was on a review. This week's bar review is on the legendary, enormous, impossible-to-dislike Blob's Park in Jessup. Blob's Park has been in Maryland since 1933, and claims to be the first place in America to celebrate Oktoberfest. As the Bavarian celebration winds down, it might be the spot in town for oompah music and German beer. From the review , "Blob's is Maryland's very own Valhalla, a beer hall as big as an airport hangar where German culture is celebrated year-round, though with especially distinguished gusto during these few weeks in the fall.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties, and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
By Dave Gordon and Dave Gordon,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
Using 400 pounds of tenderized pork, 45 dozen eggs, large pinches of paprika, salt, pepper, and mounds of bread crumbs, the Baltimore Kickers, a German culture club, whipped up enough schnitzel this week at its headquarters on South Broadway to feed the hundreds of party-goers expected at this weekend's Oktoberfest. In its 33rd year, the Oktoberfest is an celebration of gemutlichkeit, or the good life. Along with Old World comfort food, such as schnitzel, sauerbraten and strudel, organizers promise a full menu of German music, dancing and beer.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
It's a Friday night in October and the revelers sit at long tables in a Bavarian biergarten. The bratwurst is ample, the beer pitchers overflowing and the polka music is almost nonstop. German culture is all around. Germany, however, is an ocean away. This is Blob's Park, a Teutonic outpost in Jessup that for more than three-quarters of a century has offered a little piece of Germany tucked away on a Maryland farm. And at the heart of it all is the polka. "The people ... come here to dance," says Leon Umberger, hardworking accordion player for the house band, the Rheinlanders, wiping sweat off his forehead on a recent night.
NEWS
By Dave Gordon and Dave Gordon,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
Using 400 pounds of tenderized pork, 45 dozen eggs, large pinches of paprika, salt, pepper, and mounds of bread crumbs, the Baltimore Kickers, a German culture club, whipped up enough schnitzel this week at its headquarters on South Broadway to feed the hundreds of partygoers expected at this weekend's Oktoberfest. In its 33rd year, the Oktoberfest is an celebration of gemutlichkeit, or the good life. Along with Old World comfort food, such as schnitzel, sauerbraten and strudel, organizers promise a full menu of German music, dancing and beer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2011
Here's the part where you tell me how wrong (or how right!) I was on a review. This week's bar review is on the legendary, enormous, impossible-to-dislike Blob's Park in Jessup. Blob's Park has been in Maryland since 1933, and claims to be the first place in America to celebrate Oktoberfest. As the Bavarian celebration winds down, it might be the spot in town for oompah music and German beer. From the review , "Blob's is Maryland's very own Valhalla, a beer hall as big as an airport hangar where German culture is celebrated year-round, though with especially distinguished gusto during these few weeks in the fall.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford and Vicki Wellford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1997
THE U.S. OLYMPIC Committee and USA Baseball have invited the Arundel Cats ball team to participate in the 1997 USA Junior Olympic Baseball Championships June 20-29 in Fort Myers, Fla.So the Wolfpack Kruizers Kustom Kar Club will be host of a car show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 31 at Arundel Senior High School. It's open to all cars 1972 and older, and proceeds will help underwrite the Cats' trip.Ron Borkoski, who runs a body shop in Glen Burnie, will customize a trophy for the car that wins best of show.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
It's a Friday night in October and the revelers sit at long tables in a Bavarian biergarten. The bratwurst is ample, the beer pitchers overflowing and the polka music is almost nonstop. German culture is all around. Germany, however, is an ocean away. This is Blob's Park, a Teutonic outpost in Jessup that for more than three-quarters of a century has offered a little piece of Germany tucked away on a Maryland farm. And at the heart of it all is the polka. "The people ... come here to dance," says Leon Umberger, hardworking accordion player for the house band, the Rheinlanders, wiping sweat off his forehead on a recent night.
NEWS
By Dave Gordon and Dave Gordon,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
Using 400 pounds of tenderized pork, 45 dozen eggs, large pinches of paprika, salt, pepper, and mounds of bread crumbs, the Baltimore Kickers, a German culture club, whipped up enough schnitzel this week at its headquarters on South Broadway to feed the hundreds of partygoers expected at this weekend's Oktoberfest. In its 33rd year, the Oktoberfest is an celebration of gemutlichkeit, or the good life. Along with Old World comfort food, such as schnitzel, sauerbraten and strudel, organizers promise a full menu of German music, dancing and beer.
NEWS
By Dave Gordon and Dave Gordon,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
Using 400 pounds of tenderized pork, 45 dozen eggs, large pinches of paprika, salt, pepper, and mounds of bread crumbs, the Baltimore Kickers, a German culture club, whipped up enough schnitzel this week at its headquarters on South Broadway to feed the hundreds of party-goers expected at this weekend's Oktoberfest. In its 33rd year, the Oktoberfest is an celebration of gemutlichkeit, or the good life. Along with Old World comfort food, such as schnitzel, sauerbraten and strudel, organizers promise a full menu of German music, dancing and beer.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 2002
I SUPPOSE I expected to find a group of somber women praying and listening to speeches at the recent meeting of The Christian German-American Women's Club that I attended. Was I wrong! Instead, I met a gaily dressed crowd, full of laughter - and all speaking German. Now, I don't know a word of German, but it didn't matter. Even without understanding the words, it was clear that people were having fun and doing good things at the same time. Since I began writing this column, I have included monthly notices about this club.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
Mohamed Esa might officially be of Palestinian descent and hold Israeli citizenship, but he's really more German than anything else. He even goes by the nickname of "Mo Fritz." A professor of foreign languages at Western Maryland College since 1993, Esa is one of nine recipients nationwide of the 2000 Certificate of Merit from the American Association of Teachers of German and the Goethe-Institut New York. He will pick up the award, which includes a certificate he can use toward the purchase of materials for teaching German, at next month's AATG annual meeting in Boston.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine, but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
Mohamed Esa might officially be of Palestinian descent and hold Israeli citizenship, but he's really more German than anything else. He even goes by the nickname of "Mo Fritz." A professor of foreign languages at Western Maryland College since 1993, Esa is one of nine recipients nationwide of the 2000 Certificate of Merit from the American Association of Teachers of German and the Goethe-Institut New York. He will pick up the award, which includes a certificate he can use toward the purchase of materials for teaching German, at next month's AATG annual meeting in Boston.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | September 22, 1995
BALTIMORE WAS a literate blue-collar town when The Evening Sun was in its glory, and now that there are no blue-collar towns left, illiterate has become the national style and The Evening Sun is finished. ''Kaput,'' as F. Millard Foard liked to say when forecasting the future of some wretched dilatory student in his high school German class.''Kaput'' with last Friday's final edition.Baltimore was the kind of town whose public high schools offered German in 1939, and many students took it. There was a strain of sober, old-fashioned German culture from long-ago immigrations, and there was an incoming tide of new German culture being brought by Jewish refugees from Hitler.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Mohamed Esa is a Palestinian and an Israeli citizen who went to Germany to study medicine but got hooked on German language and culture.He considers Goethe an equal to Shakespeare and the Black Forest a magical place.The Western Maryland College professor presided over festivities yesterday that brought 450 high school and middle school students to the campus to celebrate German-American Day.Students from Anne Arundel, Carroll, Harford, Howard and Baltimore counties, and Washingtonlearned about Goethe and the Holocaust.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 8, 1998
When the Maryland Oktoberfest celebrates its 30th anniversary this weekend at the 5th Regiment Armory, Barbara McCrea will be swirling on the dance floor just like she did that first year back in 1969.McCrea was 16 then. She and her friends would dance the polka and waltz taught to them as children by their German parents and grandparents.This weekend, though, she and her husband, Joel, will be performing as part of Immergruen (evergreen), a German folk dancing troupe. And when the deep hem of her dirndl swings with the oompah music, few will realize the time it took to dress in the traditional peasant garb.
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