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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | June 10, 1991
NEUBRANDENBURG, Germany -- In Europe's biggest tank workshop, the new German army has found an unlikely symbol: a 45-ton armored firetruck.Built on the chassis of a Soviet T-55 tank, the "water buffalo" is a mixture of East and West, built in the East German workshop but now integrated into united Germany's Western-equipped army.And with proposals calling for the tank to be sent to catastrophes around the world, it also exemplifies the army's plans to be active overseas.This and other signs of the East and West German armies' smooth integration have confounded many critics who expected the 41-year archenemies to mix like water and oil.In fact, the West German Bundeswehr has managed to absorb the East German National People's Army more easily than the two countries themselves are integrating.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2013
Stanley J. Andrzejewski Sr., a retired electronics engineer who survived the nearly ill-fated assault on Italy's Mount Belvedere during World War II, died Thursday of respiratory failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. The son of a plumber-prize fighter and a homemaker, Stanley Joseph Andrzejewski Sr. was born in Baltimore and raised at 1612 Thames St. in Fells Point. In 1943, Mr. Andrzejewski dropped out of Patterson High School and enlisted in the Army, and after completing basic training, decided to join the men of the 10th Mountain Division, who were known as "soldiers on skis" and whose training facility was near Vail, Colo.
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NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 25, 1990
BERLIN -- In front of the memorial to the victims of fascism and militarism, East German honor guards have stopped goose-stepping to and fro. Now they just march.This change is the most visible sign that the East German National People's Army is transforming itself as it prepares for its place in a unified German army. The composition and budget of this future army, due to be formed in October, is still controversial, but it is planned to be without the NPA's sometimes questionable traditions.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 17, 2006
Joseph Julius "Peppi" Simmeth, a retired Bel Air butcher who as a German World War II prisoner spent six years in Soviet captivity, died of cancer Saturday at his Bel Air home. He was 83. Born in Passau, Germany, he enlisted in the German army at 17 and fought on the Eastern Front. In a 2003 talk at John Carroll School in Bel Air, Mr. Simmeth recounted his wartime experiences, including the winter siege at Stalingrad, where the German army was defeated. Days before Stalingrad fell, he was sent to fight at Kursk, a battle that involved nearly 400 tanks.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | May 17, 2006
Joseph Julius "Peppi" Simmeth, a retired Bel Air butcher who as a German World War II prisoner spent six years in Soviet captivity, died of cancer Saturday at his Bel Air home. He was 83. Born in Passau, Germany, he enlisted in the German army at 17 and fought on the Eastern Front. In a 2003 talk at John Carroll School in Bel Air, Mr. Simmeth recounted his wartime experiences, including the winter siege at Stalingrad, where the German army was defeated. Days before Stalingrad fell, he was sent to fight at Kursk, a battle that involved nearly 400 tanks.
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The grainy, often badly focused black-and-white photographs from the Eastern front are of Jews and others being tormented, humiliated, shot and hanged, of corpses in mass graves -- the workaday world of genocide.Such has been this century's dark side, these photographs might have scant power to shock, but for the significance of their amateurishness: Eighty percent of the photos in the exhibit were taken by ordinary soldiers in the German army, and most record actions by the regular army, not the SS, Waffen-SS or the Einsatzgruppen killing squads.
NEWS
By Geoffrey W. Fielding | December 2, 1991
RED STORM ON THE REICH. By Christopher Duffy. Atheneum. 403 pages. $27.50. THE BRUTAL German attack on Russia in 1941 was repaid in full when the Soviet armies crossed the Vistula on Jan. 12, 1945, crushed the German Panzers and practically wiped the German army off the face of the Earth as they captured Berlin.The Soviet Union, in what it called the "great patriotic war," suffered more than 27 million deaths! Of these, at least 7 million were civilians. Another 3.25 million were soldiers who died in German captivity.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | February 13, 1993
BERLIN -- A delegation of young Jewish Americans from B'nai B'rith leaves Germany today after finding the neo-Nazi chaos they expected exaggerated, the small Jewish community surprisingly vital and the chief of staff of the German army fascinating.They come away from a "snapshot" fact-finding mission of five days cautiously positive about German democracy, but stressing the need for continued vigilance."The reports of chaos in Germany are greatly exaggerated," said Steve Gutow, executive director of the National Jewish Democratic Council.
NEWS
October 8, 2002
Saul Herbert Barnett, 72, a Baltimore-born entertainment lawyer and film and theater producer, died of cancer Thursday in Aspen, Colo. Mr. Barnett was a 1947 graduate of City College, and earned his undergraduate and law degrees at New York's Columbia University in the 1950s. He practiced entertainment law in New York City and Beverly Hills, Calif., and dabbled in movies and plays, producing Give 'Em Hell Harry, a theater production starring James Whitmore, and the 1979 Richard Pryor in Concert film.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 10, 1995
Paris. -- On March 29 Ernst Juenger celebrated his 100th birthday. German Chancellor Helmut Kohl was in attendance. Few Americans will have heard of Ernst Juenger, but he is a major figure in modern German literature and today, as for many years, a cause of political controversy.A romantic young man from a middle-class family, he ran away from home in 1912 and joined the French Foreign Legion. His father went after him and got him released. Two years later the war came and he joined the German army.
NEWS
October 8, 2002
Saul Herbert Barnett, 72, a Baltimore-born entertainment lawyer and film and theater producer, died of cancer Thursday in Aspen, Colo. Mr. Barnett was a 1947 graduate of City College, and earned his undergraduate and law degrees at New York's Columbia University in the 1950s. He practiced entertainment law in New York City and Beverly Hills, Calif., and dabbled in movies and plays, producing Give 'Em Hell Harry, a theater production starring James Whitmore, and the 1979 Richard Pryor in Concert film.
NEWS
By George F. Will | December 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The grainy, often badly focused black-and-white photographs from the Eastern front are of Jews and others being tormented, humiliated, shot and hanged, of corpses in mass graves -- the workaday world of genocide.Such has been this century's dark side, these photographs might have scant power to shock, but for the significance of their amateurishness: Eighty percent of the photos in the exhibit were taken by ordinary soldiers in the German army, and most record actions by the regular army, not the SS, Waffen-SS or the Einsatzgruppen killing squads.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 10, 1995
Paris. -- On March 29 Ernst Juenger celebrated his 100th birthday. German Chancellor Helmut Kohl was in attendance. Few Americans will have heard of Ernst Juenger, but he is a major figure in modern German literature and today, as for many years, a cause of political controversy.A romantic young man from a middle-class family, he ran away from home in 1912 and joined the French Foreign Legion. His father went after him and got him released. Two years later the war came and he joined the German army.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 4, 1994
BERLIN -- When the last trainload of Red Army troops rolled out of Germany last week, the Russians left unanswered a major question: What to do with all the vacated real estate -- 1,026 tracts totaling 667,000 acres, pocked with tumbledown buildings, toxic dumps and many thousands of unexploded artillery shells?Germany was studying this dubious windfall even before the Russians boarded their trains for home. In the past three years, Germany has had to spend $700 million just to keep the ground water safe.
NEWS
By Blaine Taylor | July 20, 1994
TODAY MARKS the 50th anniversary of the most famous of the numerous attempts made on the life of German Chancellor Adolf Hitler, then 55.On June 20, 1944, German Army Colonel Count Claus Schenck von Stauffenberg put his yellow leather briefcase containing a bomb under Hitler's conference table, just a few feet from the fuhrer, then was called from the meeting to take a prearranged telephone call from an assistant. The bomb detonated killing two of Hitler's staff and seriously injuring a half-dozen others.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | March 8, 1993
BERLIN -- If Germany's major political parties ever agree that they want to send combat troops abroad, they will have another obstacle to pass: Many German young men claim conscientious objector status and get it -- even without the prospect of danger.All German men can be drafted for military service at age 19. But claiming conscientious objector status in Germany is easy; 95 percent of those who ask receive it.During the Persian Gulf war, when Germany first began talking about taking part in overseas missions, refusal rates among draftees shot up to nearly 30 percent.
NEWS
By Blaine Taylor | July 20, 1994
TODAY MARKS the 50th anniversary of the most famous of the numerous attempts made on the life of German Chancellor Adolf Hitler, then 55.On June 20, 1944, German Army Colonel Count Claus Schenck von Stauffenberg put his yellow leather briefcase containing a bomb under Hitler's conference table, just a few feet from the fuhrer, then was called from the meeting to take a prearranged telephone call from an assistant. The bomb detonated killing two of Hitler's staff and seriously injuring a half-dozen others.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 4, 1994
BERLIN -- When the last trainload of Red Army troops rolled out of Germany last week, the Russians left unanswered a major question: What to do with all the vacated real estate -- 1,026 tracts totaling 667,000 acres, pocked with tumbledown buildings, toxic dumps and many thousands of unexploded artillery shells?Germany was studying this dubious windfall even before the Russians boarded their trains for home. In the past three years, Germany has had to spend $700 million just to keep the ground water safe.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | February 13, 1993
BERLIN -- A delegation of young Jewish Americans from B'nai B'rith leaves Germany today after finding the neo-Nazi chaos they expected exaggerated, the small Jewish community surprisingly vital and the chief of staff of the German army fascinating.They come away from a "snapshot" fact-finding mission of five days cautiously positive about German democracy, but stressing the need for continued vigilance."The reports of chaos in Germany are greatly exaggerated," said Steve Gutow, executive director of the National Jewish Democratic Council.
NEWS
By Geoffrey W. Fielding | December 2, 1991
RED STORM ON THE REICH. By Christopher Duffy. Atheneum. 403 pages. $27.50. THE BRUTAL German attack on Russia in 1941 was repaid in full when the Soviet armies crossed the Vistula on Jan. 12, 1945, crushed the German Panzers and practically wiped the German army off the face of the Earth as they captured Berlin.The Soviet Union, in what it called the "great patriotic war," suffered more than 27 million deaths! Of these, at least 7 million were civilians. Another 3.25 million were soldiers who died in German captivity.
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