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By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2001
Q. My evergreen euonymus hedge seems to grow all year. How often should I prune it? A. There are a number of different varieties of evergreen euonymus. Some grow quite slowly and need little or no pruning. Others, like Euonymus 'Manhattan,' grow quite rapidly and may require regular pruning. It sounds as if you have this type. It grows from mid-spring until the last frost. Unfortunately, the more you prune, the more it will grow. If you are trying to maintain a neat hedge within a limited space, you will need to shear or prune the hedge every four to six weeks.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 27, 2014
Wow. That was fast. I distinctly remember thinking during the cool, wet spring that summer would never arrive. Now I flip open my calendar and see that Labor Day is Monday. My Facebook feed is filled with back-to-school pictures of children. Summer is over, and not just for the kids. I remember waiting for what seemed like forever for summer, for that distinctive smell of warming earth, for signs of life in the garden. For those first nights on the deck, watching for fireflies and the dark shadows of bats, flying and feeding.
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NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 1, 2007
An exquisite rose and three carnations by the 17th-century English still-life painter Alexander Marshal. A charming floral study by Delacroix. Cezanne's luminous watercolor image of geraniums. These are not the sort of paintings museum-goers are likely to associate with Robert and Jane Meyerhoff, the Baltimore philanthropists renowned for their superb collection of postwar American art. FLORAL STILL LIFES / / Through June 10 / / Walters Art Museum / / 410-547-9000
EXPLORE
Kathy Hudson | September 4, 2011
As the days shorten, one bright spot in scraggly gardens is the increased intensity of summer annuals. Zinnias, vincas, begonias and geraniums in our yard are deeper pinks than they've been all this scorching summer.    When flowers are produced in color temperatures, their colors are deeper. Thankfully, temperatures in recent weeks have been much coolor. Our deep pink geraniums and drought-tolerant vincas now look fluorescent. Ditto the magenta-purple zinnias whose seeds were given to me by a friend.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson | May 25, 2011
On Monday I had to wear pajamas down to breakfast. No, it wasn’t because I was ill. No, it wasn’t because I had no clean clothes. And no, it wasn’t because I was feeling lazy. It was because I had to keep myself from going out into the garden right after breakfast. For the previous two mornings I’d bolted out the back door the minute I bolted down breakfast. I didn’t read the paper first. I didn’t do the word scramble I normally do before starting the day. I barely combed my hair.
EXPLORE
Kathy Hudson | September 4, 2011
As the days shorten, one bright spot in scraggly gardens is the increased intensity of summer annuals. Zinnias, vincas, begonias and geraniums in our yard are deeper pinks than they've been all this scorching summer.    When flowers are produced in color temperatures, their colors are deeper. Thankfully, temperatures in recent weeks have been much coolor. Our deep pink geraniums and drought-tolerant vincas now look fluorescent. Ditto the magenta-purple zinnias whose seeds were given to me by a friend.
NEWS
By Polly Thornton | July 7, 1995
I love twilight when breezes are stilled and the plaintiff call of the whip-poor-will can be heard echoing from the daisy-covered hillside and banjo frogs bellow their croaky courting calls while hummingbirds hover over salmon colored geraniums and sip the nectar from the porch-side feeders, the red-throated male at one and the plain female at the other and I feel my mother looking...
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
Planting season takes on a different character every year. This year's rain produced prodigious peony crops. It gave us backyard gardeners not much time to plant right after the frost date in early May. Either rain fell, or the ground was too saturated to plant. The skies cleared for the weekend of May 20. Local nurseries swarmed with customers at early hours, and almost every household in the neighborhood had someone out weeding or planting. By Monday, May 23, I had to restrain myself from going out into the garden immediately after breakfast.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
PORT REPUBLIC - In a giant greenhouse that once housed a half-million tiny tobacco plants, Earl "Buddy" Hance ambles though a colorful sea of geraniums, impatiens and marigolds. Hance is one of the more than 650 Southern Maryland tobacco farmers who have accepted a state buyout to quit growing tobacco and are looking to move into other lines of farming. He switched to flowers. He has more than 2,000 pots of geraniums and impatiens in a 35-by-300-foot greenhouse in the back yard of the Broomes Island Road home where he grew up. A second greenhouse, of equal size, contains more than a 1,000 4-inch and 6-inch pots of purple, red, white and orange impatiens.
NEWS
By LOIS SYZMANSKI and LOIS SYZMANSKI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 1995
THE NOTE arrived in the mailbox of Richard and Betty Little with only a house number and an address on the front. No names.Inside of the flowery card someone had written: "This is just a note to say how much I enjoy seeing your beautiful flowers every year. Thank you for bringing a taste of God's beauty to the earth, and joy to my heart!" It was signed, Sherry.To Mr. and Mrs. Little of Littlestown Pike in Westminster, the note was like a reward a reason to continue to plant and care for the flowers that have decorated their yard for the past 43 years.
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
Planting season takes on a different character every year. This year's rain produced prodigious peony crops. It gave us backyard gardeners not much time to plant right after the frost date in early May. Either rain fell, or the ground was too saturated to plant. The skies cleared for the weekend of May 20. Local nurseries swarmed with customers at early hours, and almost every household in the neighborhood had someone out weeding or planting. By Monday, May 23, I had to restrain myself from going out into the garden immediately after breakfast.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson | May 25, 2011
On Monday I had to wear pajamas down to breakfast. No, it wasn’t because I was ill. No, it wasn’t because I had no clean clothes. And no, it wasn’t because I was feeling lazy. It was because I had to keep myself from going out into the garden right after breakfast. For the previous two mornings I’d bolted out the back door the minute I bolted down breakfast. I didn’t read the paper first. I didn’t do the word scramble I normally do before starting the day. I barely combed my hair.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 1, 2007
An exquisite rose and three carnations by the 17th-century English still-life painter Alexander Marshal. A charming floral study by Delacroix. Cezanne's luminous watercolor image of geraniums. These are not the sort of paintings museum-goers are likely to associate with Robert and Jane Meyerhoff, the Baltimore philanthropists renowned for their superb collection of postwar American art. FLORAL STILL LIFES / / Through June 10 / / Walters Art Museum / / 410-547-9000
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
Nothing says summer like geraniums. The fist-sized red blooms and the chartreuse leaves of this annual have been the season's favorite potted plant since your grandma first put hers out on the front stoop on Memorial Day. "Geraniums are just a classic plant," says Susan Iglehart, who had more than 800 seedlings growing in the greenhouses behind her Glyndon home this spring. "There are all kinds of flowers to put in baskets and containers that will thrill your heart, but you always come back to the classics," said Iglehart, a horticulturist who grows and sells a variety of heirloom and popular annuals each May. Annual geraniums, which belong to the genus Pelargonium, are perfect for Maryland summers.
NEWS
By Avraham Burg | September 16, 2003
THE ZIONIST revolution has always rested on two pillars: a just path and an ethical leadership. Neither of these is operative any longer. The Israeli nation today rests on a scaffolding of corruption and on foundations of oppression and injustice. As such, the end of the Zionist enterprise is already on our doorstep. There is a real chance that ours will be the last Zionist generation. There may yet be a Jewish state here, but it will be a different sort, strange and ugly. There is time to change course, but not much.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
PORT REPUBLIC - In a giant greenhouse that once housed a half-million tiny tobacco plants, Earl "Buddy" Hance ambles though a colorful sea of geraniums, impatiens and marigolds. Hance is one of the more than 650 Southern Maryland tobacco farmers who have accepted a state buyout to quit growing tobacco and are looking to move into other lines of farming. He switched to flowers. He has more than 2,000 pots of geraniums and impatiens in a 35-by-300-foot greenhouse in the back yard of the Broomes Island Road home where he grew up. A second greenhouse, of equal size, contains more than a 1,000 4-inch and 6-inch pots of purple, red, white and orange impatiens.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | July 10, 1994
I am sitting on the back porch, enjoying our new home entertainment center: a hanging basket filled with cascading pink geraniums and a nest of chattering baby birds.No cable television for me. I have my own Nature Channel, thanks to a family of finches that has moved into the neighborhood.Where did they settle? Not in the trees or any of the birdhouses that surround our place. No, these birds passed up ordinary lodgings, landing instead on our porch, where Ms. Finch built her nest in the center of a 12-inch basket brimming with geraniums and hanging from the rafters.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | September 30, 2001
It's one of those end-of-summer rituals -- like buying school clothes or stowing the barbecue. Bringing in the plants. With the exception of the giant aloe that lives in the kitchen year-round, all my houseplants spend the summer outdoors. It's good for them and me. In summers like this one, they drink rainwater, and I enjoy the grace notes they add by the garden benches and perennial borders. Some of these plants -- like the hemstitch begonia and the rose geraniums -- have made the spring / fall transition for years.
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