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NEWS
November 25, 2003
Perhaps Boris N. Yeltsin's departure as president of Russia was more graceful. He resigned with great drama on New Year's Eve 1999, installed Vladimir V. Putin as his successor and swept away from public view. Georgia's President Eduard A. Shevardnadze left office in messier fashion. For days, protesters weary of corruption and poverty demanded that he go, chanting, "Enough." Saturday, his angry countrymen broke into parliament, and Shevardnadze fled out the back door, in great indignity, still insisting that he would not leave office.
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NEWS
May 1, 2013
Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili visited Baltimore on Wednesday as part of a U.S. tour intended to build support for his country's bid to join NATO. Saakashvili visited the city to meet with Sen. Ben Cardin, a Maryland Democrat. He has also met with officials in Washington including Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of State John Kerry. Cardin serves on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and co-chairs of the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, known as the Helsinki Commission.
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NEWS
January 7, 2004
Mikhail Saakashvili, the new president of Georgia, calls it the "Rose Revolution." Saakashvili and his democratic allies led thousands of Georgians in days of protests in November, demonstrating against corruption and vote-rigging, weary of their nation's poverty. Eventually, they forced Eduard A. Shevardnadze out of the presidency. When presidential elections were held Sunday, Saakashvili won in a landslide. The revolution began after elections for parliament were held Nov. 2. Exit polls gave the lead to the National Movement party, led by Saakashvili, but election officials declared that the winner was a party that supported Shevardnadze, and the protests began.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | candus.thomson@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 12, 2010
Just hours before the caldron was lighted to mark the start of these Winter Olympics, a young athlete's life was snuffed out in a horrific crash on the world's fastest luge track. On a morning training run under the first blue sky in days, Nodar Kumaritashvili, 21, of the Republic of Georgia lost control of his sled at about 80 mph as he came out of the final curve--nicknamed Thunderbird--and approached the finish line. He was catapulted over the outer lip of the track and slammed into an unpadded roof support post.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Correspondent | March 7, 1991
TBILISI, U.S.S.R. -- The president of Georgia rarely needs an interpreter.Zviad Gamsakhurdia, 51, an erudite man with dark, deep-set eyes and a neat mustache, speaks to visiting Russian bureaucrats in Russian, to U.S. businessmen in English, to French correspondents in French and to German parliamentarians in German.The son of a beloved Georgian writer, Konstantin Gamsakhurdia, Zviad Gamsakhurdia is by profession a literary translator. He has translated into Georgian the entire canon of American poetry, from Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman to Allen Ginsberg and Lawrence Ferlinghetti.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2004
MOSCOW - Ratcheting up pressure against the rebellious leader of an autonomous area on the Black Sea, Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili leveled treason charges yesterday against a general who had declared loyalty to the regional strongman. Saakashvili said the general had "betrayed his country" by throwing his support to Aslan Abashidze, the defiant head of the Adzharia region in this former Soviet republic. Wanted posters with the mutinous general's photo "will be put up on trees all over Georgia," he said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 20, 1993
SUKHUMI, Georgia -- As shells fell almost constantly yesterday, Georgia's leader, Eduard A. Shevardnadze, made a desperate appeal for immediate international help to stop an offensive by Abkhazian separatists on this encircled city in western Georgia.Mr. Shevardnadze, who spent the day in the local Parliament building here trying to organize Sukhumi's defense, said in a statement: "I am appealing to you from Sukhumi, not knowing if my words will ever reach you.""Regardless of what happens I will not leave this town, which has been treacherously deceived once again and whose residents have been left to face a brutal, inhuman force," he said this morning on the steps of the Parliament building.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Neews Service n | December 22, 1991
He loves silver, but not just any silver. Tony Bernard is a fan of Georgian silver, made in England from 1714 to 1820 when three kings named George -- I, II and III -- sat on the throne.Georgian silversmiths, Mr. Bernard said, "could take the most ordinary thing, such as a mustard pot, and make an extraordinary thing out of it. I emphasize English silver because England had the best silversmiths, even if they were French Huguenots who were working in England."Calling Georgian silver -- especially George III (1760-1820)
FEATURES
By Phyllis and Robert White | December 22, 1991
Americans seem to think that Christmas was invented right here in England by Charles Dickens," the cheery pub owner told us over a pint of ale. "You were raised, like we were, on the story of Tiny Tim and the family gathered around a table with a huge Christmas goose."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 24, 2002
MOSCOW - Russian warplanes bombed a mountain village in the beleaguered nation of Georgia yesterday, killing at least one civilian and wounding five others, Georgian officials said. Russia's Defense Ministry denied that the bombing occurred, but Georgian officials gave detailed accounts of a raid that they said targeted the settlement of Bukhrevi in the area of the Pankisi Gorge, north of the Georgian capital, Tbilisi. It was the latest of several reported bombings by Russian aircraft of Georgian territory since November but the first to produce reports of casualties, highlighting the deteriorating relations between the two nations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 7, 2008
TBILISI, Georgia - Newly available accounts by independent military observers of the beginning of the war between Georgia and Russia this summer call into question the long-standing Georgian assertion that it was acting defensively against separatist and Russian aggression. Instead, the accounts suggest that Georgia's inexperienced military attacked the isolated separatist capital of Tskhinvali on Aug. 7 with indiscriminate artillery and rocket fire, exposing civilians, Russian peacekeepers and unarmed monitors to harm.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 22, 2008
TBILISI, Georgia - A day before Russian forces were to pull back from positions inside Georgia under a self-declared deadline, Georgia's president said yesterday that he saw "very little if any movement" of troops from occupied areas. Speaking beside a visiting American general in Tbilisi to show support for the Georgian government and coordinate humanitarian aid, Mikheil Saakashvili said in some cases, Russian forces had advanced farther into Georgia yesterday and had "been taking over additional sites in my country."
NEWS
By RON SMITH | August 20, 2008
Nicholas Carr thinks that Google is making us "stoopid." In a recent piece in The Atlantic, he says those of us who constantly surf the Net can't concentrate properly anymore - that instant access to virtually all information reduces our attention span. Mr. Carr says he can no longer immerse himself in a book or a long article, something that used to be easy for him. Has this happened to you? I thought so. It's happened to me as well. Mr. Carr points to research that suggests we may be in the middle of neurological changes in the way we read and think.
NEWS
August 17, 2008
Power may corrupt, but the powerful often get their way. The latest example is Russia's invasion of Georgia after the former Soviet republic attacked Moscow-supported separatists in a restive province. Last week's conflict was presaged as much by history as by current events: the independence of Kosovo, rising world demand for oil and the Kremlin's unease over growing Western influence in its former vassal states. Last week, the problem was that neither the United States nor its European partners could persuade the Russians to leave immediately.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 2008
Weeks before Russian bombs started falling on Georgia, a security researcher in Massachusetts was watching an attack against the country in cyberspace. Jose Nazario of Arbor Networks in Lexington noticed a stream of data directed at Georgian government sites containing the message: win+love+in+Russia. Other Internet experts in the United States said the attacks against Georgia's Internet infrastructure began as early as July 20, with coordinated barrages of millions of requests - known as distributed denial of service, or DDOS, attacks - that overloaded certain Georgian servers.
NEWS
By Janet Stobart and Megan K. Stack and Janet Stobart and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | February 14, 2008
LONDON -- Badri Patarkatsishvili, a tycoon and opposition leader from the nation of Georgia who had often claimed that his enemies were out to kill him, was found dead at his home outside London, police said yesterday. British police said the death of Patarkatsishvili, 52, was "suspicious" and a special-crimes team was investigating. The body was taken for postmortem and toxicology tests, but no results were expected before today. Patarkatsishvili, a bitter enemy of U.S.-backed Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili, died at his lavish home in Surrey, a wealthy commuter area where he had taken up residence with his wife.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 6, 1991
TBILISI, U.S.S.R. -- "Georgia is a nation of warriors," said Merab Gelashvili, and half a dozen would-be warriors gathered in the republican parliament building chimed in with their assent.But these young men would be warriors for Georgia, only Georgia. They will not, they say, serve the Soviet empire that sprawls to the north, west and east from this little, ancient, spectacular, troubled republic."I categorically refuse to serve in the occupying army," said Mr. Gelashvili, 18, a history student at Tbilisi State University.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
FIRST, LOYOLA College in Maryland broke ground for a Tudoresque business school. Then, the University of Maryland, Baltimore began constructing a law school with Gothic overtones.Now, the Johns Hopkins University has weighed in with another building in a period style -- a neo-Georgian structure that will house its Institute for Biomedical Engineering.Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel recently approved preliminary plans for a four-story, 60,000-square-foot building called Clark Hall to be constructed on the west side of the Homewood campus by mid-2001.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporter | October 21, 2007
The grand architecture, the history and the location put Tulip Hill, the 18th-century Georgian manor, on the National Historic Landmark list. Taking the name from its towering tulip poplars and its location on a rise in Harwood, Tulip Hill is considered one of the most distinguished early Georgian southern manor homes anywhere. Its five-part design makes for an impressive approach by land and water. The main hallway's M-shaped archway that looks like twin shells and the front view of the brick home with a cherub above the front door are featured in home history books.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | May 6, 2007
As the first major building completed when the Johns Hopkins University moved in the early 1900s from downtown to its current North Baltimore location, Gilman Hall was both the literal and figurative heart of campus. Distinguished by a massive bell tower and portico, visible from many directions, it was the place where students and faculty spent most of their time. But after 92 years and numerous campus additions, that heart has grown weak. This summer, Hopkins will embark on a three-year, $73 million restoration and modernization that promises to breathe new life into this academic landmark and reinforce its role as a cultural crossroads.
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