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By John Dorsey | August 3, 1997
Georgia O'Keeffe was a native of Wisconsin, but she loved the Southwest and eventually made it her home. She first visited Santa Fe, N.M., in 1917 and by 1929 had begun spending part of each year in New Mexico. From 1949, three years after the death of Alfred Stieglitz, until her own death at 98 in 1986, she lived and worked there.So it is fitting that Santa Fe should be the home of the new Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, which opened to the public last month. Dedicated to exhibition, preservation and scholarly study O'Keeffe's work, the museum is housed in a former church near Santa Fe's central plaza.
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NEWS
November 23, 2005
Joan V.A. Kennedy, a retired mortgage lender who had worked in real estate sales, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Sunday at Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Timonium resident was 75. Joan Van Auken was born in Detroit and raised in Cleveland. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1952 from Ursuline College in Pepper Pike, Ohio, and was 63 when she earned a master's degree in liberal arts in 1993 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Mrs. Kennedy had worked as a secretary for several years before earning her real estate license.
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NEWS
November 23, 2005
Joan V.A. Kennedy, a retired mortgage lender who had worked in real estate sales, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Sunday at Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Timonium resident was 75. Joan Van Auken was born in Detroit and raised in Cleveland. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1952 from Ursuline College in Pepper Pike, Ohio, and was 63 when she earned a master's degree in liberal arts in 1993 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland. Mrs. Kennedy had worked as a secretary for several years before earning her real estate license.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 19, 2001
LET'S BEGIN BY describing the scene the other evening at the Patterson Park pool in the southeast part of this great city, a city where, just when you think you've seen it all, something else comes along that's even more astonishing. Unless I was hallucinating badly, this is what I saw: six very pregnant women in two-piece bathing suits practicing some kind of intricate water ballet, complete with Esther Williams-like smiles and theatrical arm-waving and choreography. Did I mention that two of the very pregnant women were heavily tattooed?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 31, 1993
Jan. 1, 1916, should be known as a significant date in the history of American art because it was an even more significant one in the lives of photographer Alfred Stieglitz and painter Georgia O'Keeffe. It was Stieglitz's 52nd birthday, but that was the least of it. It was also the day on which artist Anita Pollitzer brought a group of drawings by her friend Georgia O'Keeffe to show Stieglitz at his New York gallery called 291.Stieglitz was at a low point in his career and his life. Always most interested in promoting what he considered the best of contemporary art, in the early years of the 20th century he had introduced to America the work of Picasso, Braque, Cezanne and other leading European artists.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | July 6, 1993
BERLIN -- Berlin is plastered these days with posters inspired by a New York City fire truck in 1925.The poet William Carlos Williams saw the fire truck and wrote a poem about it.The artist Charles Demuth heard the poem and made a painting inspired by it.And Demuth's "I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold" has become a landmark American painting.Now it's one of the icons of this season's blockbuster show in Berlin, "American Art in the 20th Century: Painting and Sculpture 1913-1993," which has people scrambling into Martin-Gropius-Bau museum.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | June 2, 1991
O'KEEFFE AND STIEGLITZ:AN AMERICAN ROMANCE.Benita Eisler.Doubleday.494 pages. $29.50.Do we need to worship heroes? Do we need heroes at all? It is true that the hero-worship of the 19th century (knowingly created as a substitute for religion) not only resulted in Napoleon, Beethoven and Walt Whitman, but also perhaps in the homicidal clowns of the 20th century, like Mussolini. Where politicians fail, artists and poets like Picasso, Hemingway or Virginia Woolf are promoted to hero. Yet contemporary artist Jenny Holzer has rented heroic-size billboards to proclaim a different message: "We don't need another hero!"
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 16, 2001
Alfred Steiglitz almost single-handedly invented modern photography. Before Stieglitz, photography had been an amateur pastime, a commercial business and a sometime scientific tool. After him, it was an art as well. How that happened is the story told by "Alfred Stieglitz: The Eloquent Eye," the PBS "American Masters" series biography that airs tonight at 10 on channels 22 and 67. Stieglitz, born into a wealthy German-Jewish family in Hoboken, N.J., in 1864, was a phenomenon, a force of nature with a temperament as Napoleonic as his ego. He felt constantly embattled in the "fight" for photography's acceptance as art, which he waged with the relentless, take-no-prisoners determination of a military campaign.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | July 19, 2001
LET'S BEGIN BY describing the scene the other evening at the Patterson Park pool in the southeast part of this great city, a city where, just when you think you've seen it all, something else comes along that's even more astonishing. Unless I was hallucinating badly, this is what I saw: six very pregnant women in two-piece bathing suits practicing some kind of intricate water ballet, complete with Esther Williams-like smiles and theatrical arm-waving and choreography. Did I mention that two of the very pregnant women were heavily tattooed?
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 22, 1998
John Murrell's play about Georgia O'Keeffe, "The Faraway Nearby," reinforces how difficult it is to convey, in theatrical terms, the fervor that an artist expresses with paint and canvas.At Washington's Arena Stage, even the visually arresting set, by acclaimed designer Ming Cho Lee, and the intense lighting, by Allen Lee Hughes, cannot adequately enliven Murrell's script.Arena's production isn't the first time area theatergoers have had a chance to see a play about O'Keeffe. In 1995, the Mechanic Theatre presented Lanie Robertson's "Stieglitz Loves O'Keeffe," which also suffered from a deficiency of drama (though to a somewhat lesser degree)
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 16, 2001
Alfred Steiglitz almost single-handedly invented modern photography. Before Stieglitz, photography had been an amateur pastime, a commercial business and a sometime scientific tool. After him, it was an art as well. How that happened is the story told by "Alfred Stieglitz: The Eloquent Eye," the PBS "American Masters" series biography that airs tonight at 10 on channels 22 and 67. Stieglitz, born into a wealthy German-Jewish family in Hoboken, N.J., in 1864, was a phenomenon, a force of nature with a temperament as Napoleonic as his ego. He felt constantly embattled in the "fight" for photography's acceptance as art, which he waged with the relentless, take-no-prisoners determination of a military campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 16, 1999
Nothing is less real than realism," Georgia O'Keeffe once said. "Details are confusing. It is only by selection, by elimination, by emphasis that we get at the real meaning of things."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 22, 1998
John Murrell's play about Georgia O'Keeffe, "The Faraway Nearby," reinforces how difficult it is to convey, in theatrical terms, the fervor that an artist expresses with paint and canvas.At Washington's Arena Stage, even the visually arresting set, by acclaimed designer Ming Cho Lee, and the intense lighting, by Allen Lee Hughes, cannot adequately enliven Murrell's script.Arena's production isn't the first time area theatergoers have had a chance to see a play about O'Keeffe. In 1995, the Mechanic Theatre presented Lanie Robertson's "Stieglitz Loves O'Keeffe," which also suffered from a deficiency of drama (though to a somewhat lesser degree)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | August 3, 1997
Georgia O'Keeffe was a native of Wisconsin, but she loved the Southwest and eventually made it her home. She first visited Santa Fe, N.M., in 1917 and by 1929 had begun spending part of each year in New Mexico. From 1949, three years after the death of Alfred Stieglitz, until her own death at 98 in 1986, she lived and worked there.So it is fitting that Santa Fe should be the home of the new Georgia O'Keeffe Museum, which opened to the public last month. Dedicated to exhibition, preservation and scholarly study O'Keeffe's work, the museum is housed in a former church near Santa Fe's central plaza.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | July 6, 1993
BERLIN -- Berlin is plastered these days with posters inspired by a New York City fire truck in 1925.The poet William Carlos Williams saw the fire truck and wrote a poem about it.The artist Charles Demuth heard the poem and made a painting inspired by it.And Demuth's "I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold" has become a landmark American painting.Now it's one of the icons of this season's blockbuster show in Berlin, "American Art in the 20th Century: Painting and Sculpture 1913-1993," which has people scrambling into Martin-Gropius-Bau museum.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 31, 1993
Jan. 1, 1916, should be known as a significant date in the history of American art because it was an even more significant one in the lives of photographer Alfred Stieglitz and painter Georgia O'Keeffe. It was Stieglitz's 52nd birthday, but that was the least of it. It was also the day on which artist Anita Pollitzer brought a group of drawings by her friend Georgia O'Keeffe to show Stieglitz at his New York gallery called 291.Stieglitz was at a low point in his career and his life. Always most interested in promoting what he considered the best of contemporary art, in the early years of the 20th century he had introduced to America the work of Picasso, Braque, Cezanne and other leading European artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 16, 1999
Nothing is less real than realism," Georgia O'Keeffe once said. "Details are confusing. It is only by selection, by elimination, by emphasis that we get at the real meaning of things."
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | March 24, 1995
Children's author Lois Nicholson has written biographies of Cal Ripken Jr., Babe Ruth and Nolan Ryan. But she's never considered herself a big sports fan.The Baltimore author chose to write about sports figures after fielding numerous requests for books about Mr. Ripken when she was a librarian at Rock Hall Elementary School in Kent County."
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | June 2, 1991
O'KEEFFE AND STIEGLITZ:AN AMERICAN ROMANCE.Benita Eisler.Doubleday.494 pages. $29.50.Do we need to worship heroes? Do we need heroes at all? It is true that the hero-worship of the 19th century (knowingly created as a substitute for religion) not only resulted in Napoleon, Beethoven and Walt Whitman, but also perhaps in the homicidal clowns of the 20th century, like Mussolini. Where politicians fail, artists and poets like Picasso, Hemingway or Virginia Woolf are promoted to hero. Yet contemporary artist Jenny Holzer has rented heroic-size billboards to proclaim a different message: "We don't need another hero!"
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