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BUSINESS
November 5, 1991
Hechinger Co., the Landover-based home improvement retailer, said yesterday that it would close seven of its traditional Hechinger stores as part of an ongoing "repositioning."Four of the stores are in the Carolinas, where the company has based its new Home Quarters Warehouse chain: Greenville, S.C.; Charlotte, N.C. (two stores); and Durham, N.C.Two other stores, in Harrisonburg, Va., and on Georgia Avenue in Washington, "just don't fit in," said Lennie Zallar, vice president and treasurer.
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FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | October 23, 2006
WASHINGTON-- --You can still hear his buttery voice from Georgia Avenue to Georgetown, oozing from car stereos, as his loyal Washington-area fans lean back, close their eyes and holler, "Ohhhhhhh!" at the first chords of "Let's Get It On." Folks who grew up here in the 1950s still remember how he crooned with other doo-wop groups under street lights at nightfall, and how word got around about the teen from the Northeast projects who could draw hundreds of listeners. But where is the late Marvin Gaye's legacy among D.C.'s monuments, memorials and landmarks?
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SPORTS
July 12, 1997
Where: FitzGerald Tennis Center, Rock Creek Park, WashingtonWhen: Monday through July 20. Sessions daily beginning at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.Field: Defending champion Michael Chang (1) and Andre Agassi (2) lead the 56-man draw.Tickets: Call 703-276-4274 or Ticketmaster at 410-481-SEAT.Directions: Take I-95 south to I-495 west (Capital Beltway). Take southbound exit onto Georgia Avenue. Veer right on 16th Street to Kennedy Street and park on right.Pub Date: 7/12/97
NEWS
October 18, 1998
Can Georgia Ave. relax about light rail plan?In response to your Oct. 7 article "Light rail extension killed," I only hope time proves it true.However, my response to the announcement by Gov. Parris N. Glendening Oct. 2 concerning the selection of the "no-build" alternative for the Glen Burnie extension, is one of deep skepticism.I am encouraged about how the community of Georgia Avenue has been heard and given time to regroup, although I am still concerned for our neighborhood. I, for one, am not ready to shout "victory" or take down my sign and give up the fight.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1995
A Pasadena man has been arrested on charges of assaulting and robbing a Glen Burnie woman who was giving him a ride home after he changed a flat tire for her, police said.The 36-year-old woman was attacked about 7:30 p.m. Nov. 12 on Crain Highway near Georgia Avenue after a man approached her on the side of the road and offered to help, Detective Thomas L. Adams said.After he changed the tire, police said, he asked for a ride home.The woman reported that she agreed and followed the man's directions to an alley behind the first block of Georgia Avenue.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
A single line in a 29-page report filled with technical and bureaucratic jargon has put a pall over a Glen Burnie neighborhood that former first lady Pat Nixon once described as "a true bit of Americana."The fringe of 100-year-old oak trees on Georgia Avenue, the row of neat homes with front porches, trimmed lawns and white picket fences that inspired her comment are still there. But maybe not for long.The Mass Transit Administration has found that Georgia Avenue offers the fastest and least expensive way to extend the light rail in Glen Burnie.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1998
A 90-year-old Glen Burnie neighborhood that had been facing a death threat has been spared.Word came from the office of Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday that a long-feared expansion of light rail into the old-fashioned, oak-tree-lined Georgia Avenue neighborhood is no longer under consideration.Instead of spending millions of dollars on a southward expansion of the rail line from Cromwell Station in Anne Arundel County to Glen Burnie's planned town center, Glendening said, he would rather see more tracks added to existing light-rail lines between Cromwell and Hunt Valley in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1997
Talk about making a point.Last month, more than 200 Glen Burnie residents packed an auditorium to protest a state proposal to extend the central light rail line from Cromwell Station to downtown Glen Burnie through their neighborhoods and along the popular Baltimore-Annapolis Trail.On Friday, the chairman of the Glen Burnie Improvement Association's light rail committee put an exclamation point on those sentiments when he hand-delivered 2,512 letters to the state Mass Transit Administration headquarters in Baltimore.
NEWS
May 27, 1998
BRINGING LIGHT rail into Glen Burnie should enhance the community. Yet neither of the two alignments being considered to extend the line that now runs from Hunt Valley in Baltimore County to Baltimore-Washington International Airport would accomplish this goal. Before the process continues, state Mass Transit Administration officials should re-examine an option they rejected earlier.The MTA is weighing the circuitous 8th Avenue route, favored by the Glen Burnie Chamber of Commerce, and the Georgia Avenue alignment, which would destroy Glen Burnie's most picturesque residential street.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
To the relief of thousands of bikers, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has ruled out the B&A Trail as a route for a light rail extension into Glen Burnie, leaving three options for the extension -- Georgia Avenue, Eighth Avenue or no extension at all.The county Department of Recreation and Parks has fielded questions, complaints and a lot of anger from trail users who have fretted for a decade that light rail might be extended along the path.While some of the trail's 4,500 daily users cheered the announcement at a news conference yesterday on the trail, dozens of homeowners along the two remaining possible routes were not so pleased.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1998
A 90-year-old Glen Burnie neighborhood that had been facing a death threat has been spared.Word came from the office of Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday that a long-feared expansion of light rail into the old-fashioned, oak-tree-lined Georgia Avenue neighborhood is no longer under consideration.Instead of spending millions of dollars on a southward expansion of the rail line from Cromwell Station in Anne Arundel County to Glen Burnie's planned town center, Glendening said, he would rather see more tracks added to existing light-rail lines between Cromwell and Hunt Valley in Baltimore County.
NEWS
May 27, 1998
BRINGING LIGHT rail into Glen Burnie should enhance the community. Yet neither of the two alignments being considered to extend the line that now runs from Hunt Valley in Baltimore County to Baltimore-Washington International Airport would accomplish this goal. Before the process continues, state Mass Transit Administration officials should re-examine an option they rejected earlier.The MTA is weighing the circuitous 8th Avenue route, favored by the Glen Burnie Chamber of Commerce, and the Georgia Avenue alignment, which would destroy Glen Burnie's most picturesque residential street.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
A single line in a 29-page report filled with technical and bureaucratic jargon has put a pall over a Glen Burnie neighborhood that former first lady Pat Nixon once described as "a true bit of Americana."The fringe of 100-year-old oak trees on Georgia Avenue, the row of neat homes with front porches, trimmed lawns and white picket fences that inspired her comment are still there. But maybe not for long.The Mass Transit Administration has found that Georgia Avenue offers the fastest and least expensive way to extend the light rail in Glen Burnie.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1997
After more than a decade of false starts, downtown Silver Spring may finally get the boost it needs to restore it as a vital commercial center.A team of four developers, including Baltimore's RTKL Associates, unveiled a $326 million proposal yesterday that would turn vacant lots, empty buildings and half-filled parking garages in Maryland's second largest community into a "town center" of stores, offices and a hotel.The plan centers on two hubs within the 26-acre wedge of land bordered by Georgia Avenue and Colesville Road: "Silver Circle," a cluster of businesses geared toward leisure activities and evening entertainment; and "Town Square," which would include a supermarket, hardware store and civic meeting building.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 22, 1997
To the relief of thousands of bikers, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has ruled out the B&A Trail as a route for a light rail extension into Glen Burnie, leaving three options for the extension -- Georgia Avenue, Eighth Avenue or no extension at all.The county Department of Recreation and Parks has fielded questions, complaints and a lot of anger from trail users who have fretted for a decade that light rail might be extended along the path.While some of the trail's 4,500 daily users cheered the announcement at a news conference yesterday on the trail, dozens of homeowners along the two remaining possible routes were not so pleased.
SPORTS
July 12, 1997
Where: FitzGerald Tennis Center, Rock Creek Park, WashingtonWhen: Monday through July 20. Sessions daily beginning at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.Field: Defending champion Michael Chang (1) and Andre Agassi (2) lead the 56-man draw.Tickets: Call 703-276-4274 or Ticketmaster at 410-481-SEAT.Directions: Take I-95 south to I-495 west (Capital Beltway). Take southbound exit onto Georgia Avenue. Veer right on 16th Street to Kennedy Street and park on right.Pub Date: 7/12/97
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | October 23, 2006
WASHINGTON-- --You can still hear his buttery voice from Georgia Avenue to Georgetown, oozing from car stereos, as his loyal Washington-area fans lean back, close their eyes and holler, "Ohhhhhhh!" at the first chords of "Let's Get It On." Folks who grew up here in the 1950s still remember how he crooned with other doo-wop groups under street lights at nightfall, and how word got around about the teen from the Northeast projects who could draw hundreds of listeners. But where is the late Marvin Gaye's legacy among D.C.'s monuments, memorials and landmarks?
NEWS
November 20, 1992
As an exercise in political symbolism, President-elect Clinton's first pre-inaugural visit to Washington was a winner. Displaying the expertise in imagery that helped him capture the presidency, he paid ritual visits to the White House and Capitol Hill, stopped by a fund-raiser for wife Hillary's Children's Defense Fund, hobnobbed with elite Georgetown insiders and went for a stroll through a poor Georgia Avenue neighborhood of outsiders.Bill Clinton may have run for office as an apostle of change, but that does not mean he will fight Washington like Jimmy Carter did or fight government in the fashion of Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1997
Talk about making a point.Last month, more than 200 Glen Burnie residents packed an auditorium to protest a state proposal to extend the central light rail line from Cromwell Station to downtown Glen Burnie through their neighborhoods and along the popular Baltimore-Annapolis Trail.On Friday, the chairman of the Glen Burnie Improvement Association's light rail committee put an exclamation point on those sentiments when he hand-delivered 2,512 letters to the state Mass Transit Administration headquarters in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1996
Some Glen Burnie residents would lose their homes, or the B&A hiker-biker trail would be sliced in half, depending on which route is chosen to extend the Central Light Rail line from Cromwell Station to downtown Glen Burnie, according to a state report to be released today.The Mass Transit Administration's draft environmental impact study of the alternatives shows that two routes that swing north of the center of town, then cut south, would involve taking as many as 14 houses and three businesses.
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