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NEWS
December 15, 2006
The Rev. James Donald Freeze, a Jesuit priest and former provost of Georgetown University, died Sunday of Alzheimer's disease complications at his order's suburban Philadelphia retirement home. He was 74. Born in Baltimore and raised on Abell Avenue, he attended the Cathedral School and was a 1950 graduate of Loyola High School. He then entered the Society of Jesus and was ordained to the priesthood in 1968. After studying at a Jesuit seminary in Wernersville, Pa., he received a master's degree in philosophy from Weston College, now the Weston Jesuit School of Theology, in Massachusetts.
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SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Archbishop Spalding has hired Brian Phipps to be its new boys lacrosse coach, the school's athletic director Jeff Parsons announced Monday. Phipps replaces former coach Kenneth "Bear" Davis, who went 25-31 in three seasons before accepting a full-time position with Major League Lacrosse's Ohio Machine. Phipps, a Severn and 2010 Maryland graduate, spent the past two years as an assistant coach at Georgetown University. At Maryland, he was a four-year starter in goal and earned All-American honors as a senior.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
MedStar Health -- already the largest health system in the region with five hospitals in the Baltimore area and two in Washington -- and Georgetown University announced yesterday that they have decided to have MedStar operate Georgetown's financially troubled hospital.MedStar and Georgetown said they signed a "letter of commitment" yesterday but that a final agreement was several months away.The deal would represent the next step in the evolution of MedStar, which was formed a little more than a year ago by the merger of Helix Health, based in the Baltimore area, and Medlantic Healthcare Group, operator of Washington Hospital Center, the largest hospital in the District of Columbia.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
The NFL has worked on several fronts to draw in female fans: holding special stadium events for women, injecting football themes into shows such as "The Biggest Loser" and expanding lines of merchandise to include not only clothing for women and girls, but household goods such as cheese boards and stemless wine glasses. But after league officials acknowledged fumbling their response to the physical altercation between Ravens running back Ray Rice and his now-wife at a casino in Atlantic City, the outreach effort is coming under closer scrutiny.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
Howard County police will be the host of the 15th annual "Kids N Cops" kickoff in the gymnasium of Patuxent Valley Middle School in Savage at 10 a.m. today.The "Kids N Cops" program is designed to encourage interaction between young people and police officers in a comfortable setting.Today's event will feature a short film and visits from McGruff the Crime Dog and the Georgetown University mascot.Howard County Police Department will hand out vouchers that can be traded for tickets to six selected Georgetown University home games at USAir Arena in Landover.
NEWS
April 21, 2006
Jocelyn Fenwick Jones, a homemaker and former hospital administrator, died of renal and heart failure Tuesday at Georgetown University Hospital. She was 46. She was born in Baltimore and raised on Cloverhill Road in Tuscany-Canterbury. She attended the Calvert School and was a 1977 graduate of St. Timothy's School. She earned a bachelor's degree in 1981 from Georgetown University, where she also was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She earned a master's in business from George Washington University in 1984.
NEWS
March 28, 2003
A Georgetown University symposium tomorrow will present four Catholic women writers who will discuss the impact of their religion and heritage on their work. The symposium, "Catholicism, Ethnicity and American Fiction," will feature talks by Louisa Ermelino, the author of three novels celebrating New York City and her Italian heritage; Maria Amparo Escandon, born and raised in Mexico City and author of Esperanza's Book of Saints; Maureen Howard, author of nine novels and winner of the National Book Critics Award for her autobiography; and Suzanne Strempek Shea, who has written about life in New England in four novels set around her home region of Western Massachusetts.
NEWS
March 26, 2004
The Rev. Thomas Fitzgerald, a Jesuit who had been president of St. Louis University and later taught at Loyola College in Baltimore, died Monday of a heart ailment at his home on the Georgetown University campus in Washington. He was 82. The Washington native joined the Roman Catholic Society of Jesus in 1939 and was ordained as a priest in 1952 in Leuven, Belgium. He earned degrees in sacred theology at the Leuven seminary and a doctorate in classical languages from the University of Chicago.
NEWS
November 9, 1992
RUSSELL PAYNE, 17, of Ellicott City.School: a senior at Glenelg High School.Honored for: He is co-chairman of Howard County's Black Student Achievement Program and president of the Black Awareness Club at Glenelg High School. He is a member of the Student Government Association, and a member of the U.S. Region I Soccer Team, which includes 15 mid-Atlantic and Northeastern states. Russell, a goalkeeper, has been playing soccer since he was 5 years old.Goals: He wants to become a physical therapist and is interested in a number of schools, including the University of Connecticut, Georgetown University, the University of South Carolina and North Carolina State University.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
On Nov. 5, my wife and I attended a rare public dialogue between Jews and Muslims at Columbia's Beth Shalom Congregation between Imam Yahya Hendi, Muslim chaplain at Georgetown University, and Rabbi Andrew Busch of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. It is the first in a series of four Tuesday night discussions during November designed to explore the various aspects of the Arab-Israeli conflict. No reporters attended despite invitations, organizers said. In response to a question about how his message of personal good will and reconciliation might be spread more effectively, Imam Hendi recalled once being invited to appear on a network television show, but after a 35-minute "screening" interview, the show was canceled.
NEWS
The Washington Post | March 22, 2014
A Georgetown University student has been charged with possessing the powerful toxin ricin after it was discovered in his dorm room this week, according to court documents. Daniel Harry Milzman, 19, of Bethesda is facing federal charges for possession of more than 120 milligrams of the poison a potentially lethal amount. Milzman on Monday informed his residential adviser at Georgetown's McCarthy Hall that he had created ricin and showed the adviser a plastic bag containing what he claimed was the substance, court documents say. The residential adviser notified school counselors, who alerted police.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
Abraham Dash, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and federal attorney who taught at the University of Maryland school of law from 1970 until his death, died Jan. 12 of a heart attack at his home in Bowie. He was 86. News of his death prompted an outpouring from former students and colleagues, who posted online dozens of tributes to his teaching, counsel and courtly spirit. "There's little if anything left unsaid about Abe. And yet anyone who knew him would want to be a part of these acts of remembrance," wrote a law school colleague, Gordon Young.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
On Nov. 5, my wife and I attended a rare public dialogue between Jews and Muslims at Columbia's Beth Shalom Congregation between Imam Yahya Hendi, Muslim chaplain at Georgetown University, and Rabbi Andrew Busch of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. It is the first in a series of four Tuesday night discussions during November designed to explore the various aspects of the Arab-Israeli conflict. No reporters attended despite invitations, organizers said. In response to a question about how his message of personal good will and reconciliation might be spread more effectively, Imam Hendi recalled once being invited to appear on a network television show, but after a 35-minute "screening" interview, the show was canceled.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Dr. William R. Bell, an internationally known Johns Hopkins hematologist who conducted research into bleeding and clotting disorders, died Oct. 4 of complications from a blood clot at his Roland Park home. He was 78. "Bill was one of the premier hematologists of his era, hands down. He had an international reputation and was a master clinician," said Dr. Jerry L. Spivak, a Johns Hopkins Hospital hematologist who was chief of its hematology department from 1980 to 1992. "If you were ever sick, you'd want Bill Bell for your doctor.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Mark D. Sokolik, a corporate lawyer remembered as a fitness and music enthusiast, died last week after complications from a fall. He was 30. A former Hunt Valley resident who attended Loyola Blakefield in Towson, Mr. Sokolik went on to graduate from the University of Baltimore and become a top student at Georgetown University's Law Center. Since 2010, he had worked as a corporate attorney at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in New York, one of the nation's top law firms. "Mark was a real gentle person," said Frank Sokolik, his father, whom Mark talked with constantly on the phone.
EXPLORE
March 7, 2013
Archbishop Curley senior Patrick Koscher recently signed his National Letter of Intent to attend and play soccer at Georgetown University in the fall. The Hoyas finished #2 in the country last fall. Koscher, who resides in Bel Air, will be graduating this spring from Curley High School with a GPA of 4.1. He is a volunteer at St. Francis de Sales in Abingdon and helps in the community for groups such as Habitant for Humanity. Pictured, from left, are Jon Koscher (father), Patrick Koscher and Mary Pat Koscher (mother)
NEWS
September 25, 1991
Dr. Oscar Benwood Hunter Jr., 75, president of the College of American Pathologists from 1967 to 1969, died Saturday at his home on Gibson Island of cancer.A memorial mass was being offered at today at the Roman Catholic Church of the Little Flower in Bethesda.Dr. Hunter, who also had a home in Bethesda, was a pathologist and author of technical papers on hematology, neoplastic diseases and radioactive isotopes. He had been elected president of the Southern Medical Association and the Washington Society of Pathologists and was a member of the House of Delegates of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1997
Paul Fuller Du Vivier, a retired career diplomat who was imprisoned by the Nazis during World War II, died of cancer Feb. 27 at home in Hunt Valley where he had lived since 1992. He was 82.Mr. Du Vivier was a reporter for the New York Times, then joined the Foreign Service in 1941. He retired in 1972.During World War II, while vice consul in Marseille, France, Mr. Du Vivier was active with the French Resistance, which led to his arrest by the Nazis.He and eight other prisoners, including diplomats, reporters and a Russian dancer, were imprisoned for 500 days at Baden-Baden in southwestern Germany.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 26, 2012
Men's college lacrosse Hoyas associate coach Kerwick out after DWI Matt Kerwick is no longer employed as associate head coach of the Georgetown men's lacrosse program after pleading guilty last month to driving while intoxicated. A university spokesman on Monday confirmed the departure of Kerwick, who starred for the Baltimore Thunder of the now-defunct Major Indoor Lacrosse League. "I have taken full responsibility for my error in judgment this past April and I have apologized to the Georgetown lacrosse family for my mistake," Kerwick said in a statement Tuesday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
The mother of a Maryland man missing in Libya since March said Thursday that he is being held in a prison in Tripoli. Sharon VanDyke said she could not divulge details of how she learned the whereabouts of her son Matthew VanDyke, who was in Libya to work on a book, but she has been told he is in good health. "I am trying to get more information, but I will do nothing to jeopardize Matthew," she said. "The most important part of this information is that he is in good health. He is tall and thin and didn't have 20 pounds he could lose.
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