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George Young

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By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 27, 1991
As I am in the business of seeking wisdom and guidance in all things, I turn to my friend Frank Hughes the other day for his sophisticated insight on world events."
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2007
Mable Payne Young, a mother of nine who helped organize job benefits for domestic workers such as herself, died of a stroke Tuesday at Maryland General Hospital. The lifelong Baltimore resident was 93. Orphaned at birth in Baltimore, the former Mable Diggs was raised by a neighbor. She attended city schools through the eighth grade, when she left to help support her adoptive family. She became a domestic worker, tending to the homes and families of others while caring for her husband, Russell Payne, and raising her children.
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SPORTS
By VITO STELLINO | April 23, 1995
When George Young was named general manager of the New York Giants in 1979, he said all he wanted was an office with a fence around it and a gate.It was supposed to be a joke, but Young may now be ready to add some barbed wire to the fence after he found himself the target of a lot of potshots during the off-season.The hypercritical New York fans and talk shows have decided Young isn't keeping up with the times or handling the salary cap well. He got a lot of flak when his former coach, Bill Parcells, outbid him for David Meggett.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2004
The widow of football legend George B. Young has pledged a record $2 million to help build an academic building and provide scholarships at his alma mater, Calvert Hall College High School, school officials said yesterday. Young, a 1948 graduate of the prep school, was a coach for the Baltimore Colts from 1968 to 1974. During 19 years as general manager of the New York Giants, he led the team to two Super Bowl victories and helped launch the careers of coach Bill Parcells and Hall of Fame linebacker Lawrence Taylor.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue called George Young the "Renaissance man of football." Former Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who played for Mr. Young at City College, called him "the Buddha of high school football." And City athletic director and football coach George Petrides said, "Mr. Young was a true perfectionist who left nothing to chance." George Bernard Young Jr., 71, died last night at a Baltimore area hospice of a rare neurological disease. He was surrounded by his close relatives and his wife of 36 years, Kathryn Mary Love Reddington Young, who is known as "Lovey."
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1996
It's not as if George Young had the night off.Young, the general manager of the New York Giants, is a Baltimore native who had a professional interest in last night's preseason opener, as he settled into the press box at Memorial Stadium. The Ravens travel to the Meadowlands to play the Giants on Saturday, and Young was on hand to do a little scouting.Young also watched the game from a fan's perspective. And how could he miss this event? He has seen his share of firsts when it comes to football and his hometown.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2004
The widow of football legend George B. Young has pledged a record $2 million to help build an academic building and provide scholarships at his alma mater, Calvert Hall College High School, school officials said yesterday. Young, a 1948 graduate of the prep school, was a coach for the Baltimore Colts from 1968 to 1974. During 19 years as general manager of the New York Giants, he led the team to two Super Bowl victories and helped launch the careers of coach Bill Parcells and Hall of Fame linebacker Lawrence Taylor.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 11, 2001
GEORGE Young goes to his grave today, but the moment that keeps coming back is eight years ago, and the death of a fellow named Denny Wisner, and the telephone ringing in the kitchen and it was George and his wife, Lovey, calling from a distance of 200 miles and three decades. "I didn't know you followed Baltimore anymore," I said. The two of them got so upset at that. "Baltimore," they said, "is our home." George had been running the New York Giants for years by then, and taking them to championships, but never mind.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
Under steely skies and a light mist, longtime players, coaches and NFL executives gathered yesterday to pay homage to George Young, the football mastermind from East Baltimore who touched their lives. Young's funeral Mass at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen attracted about 600 mourners, some of whom came from New York City, where Young had lived and worked for the past two decades. Calling Young "one of the finest men our nation has produced," a teary-eyed Paul Tagliabue, NFL commissioner, said, "The past three months have been a trying time for all of us. We're still unable to comprehend it all."
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2002
Bob Lumsden became one of the most influential athletic directors in the history of the Maryland Scholastic Association and a longtime successful coach in baseball, football, basketball and golf at Poly. Lumsden never had a losing season in any sport he coached. His life began amid meager surroundings on Auchentoroly Terrace in the Druid Hill Park section of West Baltimore and ended Wednesday, when he died of complications from a stroke, heart and lung problems. Lumsden, 81, never forgot an experience he had one afternoon when he arrived home from Poly, said his son, Robby, yesterday.
NEWS
May 31, 2003
On May 27, 2003, MICHAEL NORMAN, beloved husband of Roslyn Y. Young; devoted father of Marquile N. Young and Aisha A. Hamilton; loving son of Leona McCoy-Young; brother of Irvin Young, George Young, Gladys Wheeler, Doris Ward, Clara Golden, Lanessa Young and Patience Young; also survived by three grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation at 2140 N. Fulton Ave. on Saturday 2 to 3 P.M. and Sunday 10 to 6 P.M. The family will receive friends at Leadenhall Baptist Church, 1021 Leadenhall St., on Monday at 10:30 A.M. Funeral at 11 A.M.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 7, 2003
TOM DULEY must have wondered about it a million times as he nursed the last drink of the evening and explained to one more stranger that, yes, he really was that Tom Duley, the guy who ran back the most famous schoolboy kickoff in some vanished ballpark in some distant lifetime. It's all gone now, and Duley must have wondered: Did it really happen back there the way I think it did? Were there really crowds calling his name, and newspaper headlines, and unlimited horizons for him and for Denny Wisner and Bob Baldwin, and for Fred Brooks and Bert Hopkins, too?
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2002
Bob Lumsden became one of the most influential athletic directors in the history of the Maryland Scholastic Association and a longtime successful coach in baseball, football, basketball and golf at Poly. Lumsden never had a losing season in any sport he coached. His life began amid meager surroundings on Auchentoroly Terrace in the Druid Hill Park section of West Baltimore and ended Wednesday, when he died of complications from a stroke, heart and lung problems. Lumsden, 81, never forgot an experience he had one afternoon when he arrived home from Poly, said his son, Robby, yesterday.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
Under steely skies and a light mist, longtime players, coaches and NFL executives gathered yesterday to pay homage to George Young, the football mastermind from East Baltimore who touched their lives. Young's funeral Mass at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen attracted about 600 mourners, some of whom came from New York City, where Young had lived and worked for the past two decades. Calling Young "one of the finest men our nation has produced," a teary-eyed Paul Tagliabue, NFL commissioner, said, "The past three months have been a trying time for all of us. We're still unable to comprehend it all."
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 11, 2001
GEORGE Young goes to his grave today, but the moment that keeps coming back is eight years ago, and the death of a fellow named Denny Wisner, and the telephone ringing in the kitchen and it was George and his wife, Lovey, calling from a distance of 200 miles and three decades. "I didn't know you followed Baltimore anymore," I said. The two of them got so upset at that. "Baltimore," they said, "is our home." George had been running the New York Giants for years by then, and taking them to championships, but never mind.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue called George Young the "Renaissance man of football." Former Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who played for Mr. Young at City College, called him "the Buddha of high school football." And City athletic director and football coach George Petrides said, "Mr. Young was a true perfectionist who left nothing to chance." George Bernard Young Jr., 71, died last night at a Baltimore area hospice of a rare neurological disease. He was surrounded by his close relatives and his wife of 36 years, Kathryn Mary Love Reddington Young, who is known as "Lovey."
NEWS
May 31, 2003
On May 27, 2003, MICHAEL NORMAN, beloved husband of Roslyn Y. Young; devoted father of Marquile N. Young and Aisha A. Hamilton; loving son of Leona McCoy-Young; brother of Irvin Young, George Young, Gladys Wheeler, Doris Ward, Clara Golden, Lanessa Young and Patience Young; also survived by three grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation at 2140 N. Fulton Ave. on Saturday 2 to 3 P.M. and Sunday 10 to 6 P.M. The family will receive friends at Leadenhall Baptist Church, 1021 Leadenhall St., on Monday at 10:30 A.M. Funeral at 11 A.M.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | February 22, 1994
It's too bad every young athlete in these parts couldn't have been at Martin's West yesterday for the State of Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame's annual induction luncheon.They would have heard wonderful and inspiring speeches -- Bob Wade's touching comments as presenter for the late Reggie Lewis; jockey Phil Grove's sincere and humble acceptance; the gratitude expressed by Ralph Bogart, who has been winning golf championships for 56 years, and who, at 75, carries a 4 handicap.But it was Tom Gatewood's message that probably would have meant the most.
SPORTS
By Bob Glauber and Bob Glauber,NEWSDAY | January 22, 2001
It has been more than three years since George Young sat alone on the New York Giants' bench, looked up into the empty seats at Giants Stadium and wept. It was Dec. 13, 1997, a few hours after the Giants beat the Washington Redskins, 30-10, to clinch the NFC East title under rookie head coach Jim Fassel. It was Young's last regular-season game at the stadium, a fitting end to an 18-year career as the team's general manager. But there was more to his tears than the sadness of his retirement; there was satisfaction in knowing he was leaving the team in capable hands.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
From a distance not always safe, Ernie Accorsi watched John Elway's awkward induction into the NFL, his quixotic rise to power, his devastating Super Bowl losses, his transcendent triumph.Now, 16 years to the day after Accorsi made Elway the No. 1 pick in the 1983 draft, he will watch the legendary quarterback complete the journey.From 22-year-old brat who wouldn't play in Baltimore to 38-year-old icon in Denver.From would-be outfielder in the New York Yankees' farm system to certain Hall of Famer with the Broncos.
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