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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 8, 1995
Headlining a new sitcom after appearing as a supporting player in the phenomenally successful "Cheers" would be hard enough. But imagine being the second supporting player from "Cheers" to headline a new sitcom, with the added pressure that the guy who blazed the trail before you, Kelsey Grammer of "Frasier," wound up in the most creatively successful sitcom spinoff in TV history. That's the dilemma facing George Wendt tonight as he launches his own CBS sitcom -- one in which, to make it even tougher, he's not playing Norm.
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By From staff reports | February 21, 1998
BaseballSheffield a no-show, gets OK to report six days late to campGary Sheffield says he can best prepare for the season by skipping the first week of spring training, and the Florida Marlins say they believe him.Sheffield failed to show up yesterday for the first full-squad workout with the Marlins, who were already short of familiar faces. The team gave Sheffield permission at the last minute to report six days late so he could continue working out at home in St. Petersburg, Fla., with his personal trainer.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
WHEN YOU PLAY Everyman before an audience of 50 millio every week, it can be hard to get a director to see you in the role of a particular man.That is the curse that goes along with the blessing of being on a hit TV show. When the character you play has a familiarity that makes him seem like someone everybody knows, then his image can accompany your every waking moment.Such is the case with George Wendt. Every week on "Cheers," he is Norm Peterson, the inertia-laden resident of the corner stool at this Boston bar. Every time Norm enters Cheers, the cast and extras -- and the studio audience for that matter -- call out, "Hey, Norm!"
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1995
That smell in the air is the first whiff of network panic. Although fall TV schedules won't be set for a month or more, these are the times that try men's souls -- or, at least, the times when the men and women in the corporate programming departments frantically shuffle programs to eke out every bit of possible information about which shows it should renew and dump. Tonight's lineup, therefore, features a lot of last-gasp efforts, including the season finales of "Party of Five," "Northern Exposure" and a sitcom.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 8, 1995
If you have ever stood around for hours in a service garage waiting for your car to be repaired, you have a pretty good idea of what watching "The George Wendt Show" on CBS is like.The new sitcom, which premieres at 8 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13), features Wendt as a car mechanic in business with his brother. It is only slightly more interesting than watching someone change the oil in your car.Not only did I not laugh once, I didn't even smile once. And I was a fan of Norm-at-the-end-of-the-bar-Peterson in "Cheers."
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 15, 1995
That smell in the air is the first whiff of network panic. Although fall TV schedules won't be set for a month or more, these are the times that try men's souls -- or, at least, the times when the men and women in the corporate programming departments frantically shuffle programs to eke out every bit of possible information about which shows it should renew and dump. Tonight's lineup, therefore, features a lot of last-gasp efforts, including the season finales of "Party of Five," "Northern Exposure" and a sitcom.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 15, 1991
Michael Jackson has never been one for half-measures, but even by his extravagant standards, the ''Black or White'' video -- which premiered on MTV, BET and the Fox network last night -- is amazing.Looking like a million bucks (and costing four million), the 11-minute clip is a state-of-the-art stunner -- so spectacular, in fact, that you might not even notice there's a song attached. That may not be the effect he had in mind. But with so much to watch, who had time to listen?First, there was McCauley Culkin, blasting his TV dad (''Cheers'' star George Wendt)
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
Ken Levine looked out over the green field of Anaheim Stadium on a brilliant Southern California summer night and said of his second career, "What's not to enjoy?""They send you all over the country to go to baseball games."Levine, the Orioles' rookie radio announcer, followed the team back to his California hometown. About 50 members of the staff of "Cheers" welcomed him this week during the two-game series with the Angels.Levine and his partner, David Issacs, were original staff writers for "Cheers" and still consult with the show one day a week and write occasional scripts.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Those who lived through the McCarthy era will find nothing new in ''Guilty By Suspicion.'' Those who are too young to have been aware of that period should find the film both riveting and informative.The late '40s ands early '50s are frequently referred to as Hollywood's ''Dark Ages,'' and that they were. Those were the years when the House Un-American Activities Committee, knowing where it would get the most coverage, forced actors, producers and directors to testify before the committee.
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By Newsday | May 6, 1993
It's almost Play Ball! time at New York's Shea Stadium. The Mets and the Dodgers are warming up on the field and George Wendt, the enduring barfly Norm in "Cheers," has emerged from the tunnel beneath the stands, prepared to toss out the first ball."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 8, 1995
If you have ever stood around for hours in a service garage waiting for your car to be repaired, you have a pretty good idea of what watching "The George Wendt Show" on CBS is like.The new sitcom, which premieres at 8 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13), features Wendt as a car mechanic in business with his brother. It is only slightly more interesting than watching someone change the oil in your car.Not only did I not laugh once, I didn't even smile once. And I was a fan of Norm-at-the-end-of-the-bar-Peterson in "Cheers."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 8, 1995
Headlining a new sitcom after appearing as a supporting player in the phenomenally successful "Cheers" would be hard enough. But imagine being the second supporting player from "Cheers" to headline a new sitcom, with the added pressure that the guy who blazed the trail before you, Kelsey Grammer of "Frasier," wound up in the most creatively successful sitcom spinoff in TV history. That's the dilemma facing George Wendt tonight as he launches his own CBS sitcom -- one in which, to make it even tougher, he's not playing Norm.
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By Newsday | May 6, 1993
It's almost Play Ball! time at New York's Shea Stadium. The Mets and the Dodgers are warming up on the field and George Wendt, the enduring barfly Norm in "Cheers," has emerged from the tunnel beneath the stands, prepared to toss out the first ball."
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By Steve McKerrow | August 12, 1992
Now here's something that has become exceedingly rare on television: A nice little local, non-documentary, dramatic film production."Sonny & Cornblatt," at 9 o'clock tonight on Maryland Public Television, tells a simple half-hour tale of love and loss and friendship and, especially, overcoming cultural and ethnic differences.Baltimore actors Ben Presbury and Leon Sigel play the title characters, elderly neighbors, one Jewish and the other black, who slowly find common ground after the former loses his wife to a heart attack.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | November 15, 1991
Michael Jackson has never been one for half-measures, but even by his extravagant standards, the ''Black or White'' video -- which premiered on MTV, BET and the Fox network last night -- is amazing.Looking like a million bucks (and costing four million), the 11-minute clip is a state-of-the-art stunner -- so spectacular, in fact, that you might not even notice there's a song attached. That may not be the effect he had in mind. But with so much to watch, who had time to listen?First, there was McCauley Culkin, blasting his TV dad (''Cheers'' star George Wendt)
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By Steve McKerrow | September 19, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:UNTRIED GOODS -- That's what new series are until significant audiences have a chance to sample them. Making their first appearances through the weekend are: Dabney Coleman in "Drexell's Class" on Fox (8:30 tonight, Channel 45); the Baltimore-set "Flesh N' Blood" (10 tonight, Channel 2); the family drama "Brooklyn Bridge" on ABC (8 p.m. Friday, Channel 13), and NBC's comedy "The Torkelsons" (8:30 p.m. Saturday).TRIED AND TRUE -- Some returning series premiering for the season (check listings for time/channel)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 12, 1992
Now here's something that has become exceedingly rare on television: A nice little local, non-documentary, dramatic film production."Sonny & Cornblatt," at 9 o'clock tonight on Maryland Public Television, tells a simple half-hour tale of love and loss and friendship and, especially, overcoming cultural and ethnic differences.Baltimore actors Ben Presbury and Leon Sigel play the title characters, elderly neighbors, one Jewish and the other black, who slowly find common ground after the former loses his wife to a heart attack.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | September 19, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:UNTRIED GOODS -- That's what new series are until significant audiences have a chance to sample them. Making their first appearances through the weekend are: Dabney Coleman in "Drexell's Class" on Fox (8:30 tonight, Channel 45); the Baltimore-set "Flesh N' Blood" (10 tonight, Channel 2); the family drama "Brooklyn Bridge" on ABC (8 p.m. Friday, Channel 13), and NBC's comedy "The Torkelsons" (8:30 p.m. Saturday).TRIED AND TRUE -- Some returning series premiering for the season (check listings for time/channel)
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | July 17, 1991
Ken Levine looked out over the green field of Anaheim Stadium on a brilliant Southern California summer night and said of his second career, "What's not to enjoy?""They send you all over the country to go to baseball games."Levine, the Orioles' rookie radio announcer, followed the team back to his California hometown. About 50 members of the staff of "Cheers" welcomed him this week during the two-game series with the Angels.Levine and his partner, David Issacs, were original staff writers for "Cheers" and still consult with the show one day a week and write occasional scripts.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | March 15, 1991
Those who lived through the McCarthy era will find nothing new in ''Guilty By Suspicion.'' Those who are too young to have been aware of that period should find the film both riveting and informative.The late '40s ands early '50s are frequently referred to as Hollywood's ''Dark Ages,'' and that they were. Those were the years when the House Un-American Activities Committee, knowing where it would get the most coverage, forced actors, producers and directors to testify before the committee.
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