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By Harold Jackson | August 30, 1997
THE FIRST TIME I was supposed to meet George Wallace, I didn't. I couldn't. I wouldn't.It was just after events depicted in the new television docudrama that shows the 1972 shooting of Alabama's governor as he campaigned for president in Laurel.Back home in Birmingham from my freshman year at a Kansas college, I had a summer job at Spain Rehabilitation Center. The hospital helped paralyzed men and women prepare for new lives without the physical mobility they had always taken for granted.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 14, 2013
American journalism has lost a giant in the passing at 85 of Jack Germond, my longtime pal and partner in the joyful chronicling of the antics and outrages of political reformers and rogues alike over the last half-century. Long before we teamed up to write a newspaper column at the old Washington Star and then at The Baltimore Sun, and eventually to write four books on presidential campaigns, Jack was in the vanguard of holding politicians' feet to the fire. He retained a skepticism about what they told him, but with respect for the best of them and a genuine affection for the many bad boys.
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FEATURES
By Tim Funk and Tim Funk,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 8, 1994
Days after his state troopers beat and tear-gassed civil rights marchers on a bridge in Selma, Ala., Gov. George Wallace turned up at the White House. President Lyndon Johnson had requested a meeting."George, you and I shouldn't be thinking about 1968," Johnson told his fellow Southerner -- and potential 1968 challenger -- on that Saturday afternoon in March 1965. "We should be thinking about 1988. We'll both be dead and gone then. What do you want left behind? You want a great, big marble monument that says, 'George Wallace: He Built'?
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
As Columbia prepared to celebrate its first birthday in June 1968, a huge challenge to its pioneering spirit loomed. On the heels of devastating riots in Baltimore following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. just two months earlier, word came that segregationist George Wallace would hold a presidential campaign rally at Merriweather Post Pavilion , in the heart of the new city's sparse downtown. The events leading up to the widely reported story of blacks and whites uniting in opposition to Wallace's visit will comprise the third class in a four-night mini-course on Columbia at the Columbia Archives starting Oct. 4. The rally had been hastily rescheduled at the closest available venue after being rejected by Baltimore police, who feared that city's wounds were so fresh that they couldn't guarantee public safety if Alabama's former governor appeared at the Civic Center.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 17, 1992
Twenty years ago, just days before his date with a gunman's bullet in Laurel, Gov. George Wallace of Alabama sat in his room at the downtown Baltimore Holiday Inn and fought with his wife.History consists of more than the names of presidents and the dates of wars. It's the little stuff, too. Wallace smothered a steak in a lava of ketchup. The wife, Cornelia, fussed over him like a schoolboy. Somewhere in America, a strange kid named Arthur Bremer was keeping a diary.Cornelia Wallace didn't wish to be interviewed.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | November 10, 2007
Avoiding the glare of a media spotlight he once craved, Arthur H. Bremer was quietly released from a state prison in Hagerstown in the predawn hours yesterday - 35 years after shooting and paralyzing former Alabama Gov. George Wallace at a 1972 campaign rally in Maryland. Rick Binetti, a spokesman for the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said Bremer will stay in Maryland but would not say where he will reside. "The department feels that the public's interest is best served by Arthur Bremer having the time to acclimate to today's world at his own pace, and also with anonymity," Binetti said.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1995
In 1965, Lyndon Johnson's Great Society was alive and well, and politicians and intellectuals were united in the belief that the problems of racism and poverty could be solved by the creative spending of sufficient amounts of money. Thirty years later, a new generation of politicians and intellectuals is carting away the rubble of the Great Society, and the public's faith in the power of government to solve any problem whatsoever is at an all-time low.How did America get from there to here?
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | September 20, 1998
My wife paused before she left for work Monday morning to let me know that TV news was reporting the death of George Wallace.I had gone to bed the night before thinking Wallace would once again recover from ailments related to his paralysis after an attempt on his life 26 years ago.Indeed, his hospital in Montgomery, Ala., had upgraded his condition, but he died last Sunday night. I lay there on my back in bed and thought for a moment.George Wallace had affected my life as a child growing up in Alabama, as a young college student who worked in the Birmingham hospital where he was brought after being shot in Maryland, and as a news reporter who covered his last two terms as governor.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | August 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even before its public release, a new Hollywood-made docudrama about former Alabama Gov. George Wallace has generated a mini-controversy about the liberties its maker has taken with the facts.In "George Wallace," by veteran director-producer JohnFrankenheimer, a black convicted murderer named Archie who has become a prison trustee working for Mr. Wallace at the mansion takes an ice pick from a kitchen drawer and contemplates stabbing him, but in the end decides against it.The incident never happened and Frankenheimer acknowledges it. He defends the scene as a dramatic device to convey the anger of black Alabamans toward Mr. Wallace, who at the time was a leader of the cause of racial segregation in the Deep South.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
Sometimes as he lies in bed, curled almost like a fetus in his paralysis, George Wallace feels the bullets of Arthur Bremer plowing into him again from 20 years distant. He grabs for his side and back, twisting spasmodically in pain, while visitors in the room watch in horror, thinking that the old governor must be near death.At other times, when the pain is gone, Mr. Wallace will recount how a scheduling mix-up almost prompted him to call off his trip to Laurel on that morning of May 15, 1972.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | January 26, 2009
George L. Wallace Jr., a Coast Guard veteran who was stationed in Hawaii in its early days of statehood and a longtime fly-fishing enthusiast, died of lung cancer Jan. 16 at his daughter's home in Arnold. He was 69. Mr. Wallace was born in Baltimore to a seamstress and a mill foreman and grew up on North Robinson Street on the city's east side. In 1957, he graduated from Mount St. Joseph High School, and he joined the Coast Guard that year. He was stationed in 1959 on the island of Kauai.
ENTERTAINMENT
By ISHITA SINGH | July 10, 2008
'Moonstruck' in Little Italy The Little Italy Film Festival is back in Baltimore for the summer. The popular outdoor film fest's first showing is Moonstruck, the Oscar-winning story about a widow in love with her fiance's brother. The film stars Cher and Nicolas Cage. All the films in the eight-week series are thematically related to Italy. Live entertainment precedes each screening and features Aldo and Corrado Locco playing traditional Italian tunes. The film festival runs Fridays at High and Stiles streets in Little Italy.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Capital News Service | November 18, 2007
Jack Ingram of Severn was 27 when he witnessed a horrifying, defining moment in two men's lives: the assassination attempt in Laurel by a disturbed, unemployed janitor on Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace. The May 15, 1972, shooting happened moments after Wallace spoke to about 1,000 people at a political rally at Laurel Shopping Center. Arthur Bremer, then 21, urged Wallace to shake hands, then emptied four rounds from a pistol into the presidential candidate's stomach. Bremer was released Nov. 9 from the Maryland Correctional Institute in Hagerstown into a world that is still shadowed by the event.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,Sun reporter | November 10, 2007
Avoiding the glare of a media spotlight he once craved, Arthur H. Bremer was quietly released from a state prison in Hagerstown in the predawn hours yesterday - 35 years after shooting and paralyzing former Alabama Gov. George Wallace at a 1972 campaign rally in Maryland. Rick Binetti, a spokesman for the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said Bremer will stay in Maryland but would not say where he will reside. "The department feels that the public's interest is best served by Arthur Bremer having the time to acclimate to today's world at his own pace, and also with anonymity," Binetti said.
FEATURES
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
At the height of the Vietnam War, in his song, "The Fightin' Side of Me," a cantankerous ex-con named Merle Haggard told hippie protesters, "If you don't love [America], leave it; let this song that I'm singin' be a warning." Thirty-six years later, the whiskey-voiced star spends much of his hard-earned credibility questioning the war in Iraq and defending the Dixie Chicks, the country-music trio whose radio airplay went south three years ago after they slammed President Bush on foreign soil.
NEWS
June 3, 2003
Burke Marshall, 80, the government's legal strategist on civil rights in the era of freedom rides, the Birmingham church bombing and the March on Washington, died yesterday at his home in Newtown, Conn., of a bone marrow disorder. As assistant attorney general in charge of the Justice Department's civil rights division in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, Mr. Marshall was a chief contributor to rights victories that included the government's 1961 ban on segregation in interstate travel, desegregation of the University of Mississippi the next year, and adoption of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, which barred discrimination in public accommodations.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2000
OK, maybe George Wallace wasn't a virulent segregationist deep down at the core of his soul. That may make what he did even more repugnant. An opportunistic politician if ever there was one, Wallace started his career as something of a progressive; during his first gubernatorial campaign, in 1958, he highlighted his determination to fight for Alabama's poor equally, without regard to their skin color. But he lost that race to a candidate who made separation of the races a cornerstone of his campaign, and Wallace hated to lose.
NEWS
September 16, 1998
FOR 26 YEARS after he was shot by Arthur Bremer in a Laurel shopping center, George C. Wallace endured unbearable phantom pains in his paralyzed legs. Some said God wouldn't let Alabama's infamous segregationist governor die until he had suffered greatly for the anguish he had caused others. True or not, the suffering is over. Mr. Wallace, 79, died Sunday,He was perhaps the most important loser in the history of American politics. Having built a powerful political machine in Alabama on a vow never to be "out-segged," Mr. Wallace took his racist rhetoric national in a 1964 presidential campaign that received surprising support in the North.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | December 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Several readers have e-mailed requests for me to please write something about what a boneheaded statement Senate Republican leader Trent Lott made during his tribute to South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond on Dec. 5. I am honored that some people, in their quest for an alternative to the babble-on gasbags of conservative talk radio and cable TV, would turn to a cut-up like me to be their hatchet man. Still, liberals should be reluctant in...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2002
By George, he's funny George Wallace is coming to town. No, not George Wallace the Deep South politician. He left this world a few years back, remember? The George Wallace who rolls into Baltimore tomorrow is a standout stand-up comedian. The 1995 winner of the American Comedy Award for Best Stand-up Comedian, Wallace has been called (by peers) "the guy who can roll over the room if it's dead." Can't get much funnier than that. Catch him at the Improv, 6 Market Place, tomorrow at 8:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., Saturday at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. and Sunday at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25. Call 410-727-8500.
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