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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 7, 2000
For the august judges at Baltimore's Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse, May 30 might as well have been called Black Tuesday. That day marked the return of their nemesis to the courthouse plaza, a whimsically painted outdoor sculpture by New York artist George Sugarman entitled "Baltimore Federal." Over the past quarter century, the court's sober-minded jurists had come to loathe the work heartily. It was removed three years ago for repairs, and it's recent return to the Garmatz building inevitably ignited longstanding local grumbling.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | August 7, 2000
For the august judges at Baltimore's Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse, May 30 might as well have been called Black Tuesday. That day marked the return of their nemesis to the courthouse plaza, a whimsically painted outdoor sculpture by New York artist George Sugarman entitled "Baltimore Federal." Over the past quarter century, the court's sober-minded jurists had come to loathe the work heartily. It was removed three years ago for repairs, and it's recent return to the Garmatz building inevitably ignited longstanding local grumbling.
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By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
For two decades, few people have understood the multicolored metal sculpture outside Baltimore's federal courthouse. Even fewer have liked it.As workers at the Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse finished dismantling "Baltimore Federal" yesterday and sent it away for a five-month makeover, many who work at the building expressed hope it would never return."
NEWS
July 10, 1995
The controversy over the George Sugarman sculpture at the entrance to the Garmatz Federal Courthouse in downtown Baltimore is one of the city's longer-running disputes. The federal judges say the brightly colored metal structure detracts from the dignity of the court. Yet many people think the piece is a welcome relief from the relentless grayness of the federal building.Then came a bombshell from U.S. Marshal Scott A. Sewell, who called Mr. Sugarman's work a security risk in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing and asked that it be removed.
NEWS
September 3, 1999
George Sugarman, 87, a sculptor whose colorful geometric aluminum designs were seen in museums around the world, died Aug. 25 in New York. He made his work friendly, incorporating benches and canopies into the architecturally scaled works.In 1975, one such piece, commissioned by the General Services Administration for the Garmatz Federal Courthouse in Baltimore, was opposed by several judges with offices in the building, first on aesthetic grounds. Later, they said it could be dangerous for children.
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By NEIL A. GRAUER | April 15, 1994
The General Assembly's decision to install a statue of the late Justice Thurgood Marshall on the northwest side of the State House in Annapolis is splendid, appropriate and overdue.Allocating $100,000 for a statue design competition isn't so smart.No need exists for a new, costly competition for a Marshall statue, because a perfectly superb one already exists -- and is in dire need of proper placement.Baltimore's renowned and venerable sculptor Reuben Kramer labored mightily for several years on an exceptionally fine, 8-foot-7-inch-high bronze statue of Justice Marshall, for which the jurist returned to his hometown a number of times to pose.
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By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
Under a plan that would bring sweeping changes to the appearance of Baltimore's federal courthouse, a forgotten statue of Thurgood Marshall would take center stage while another more controversial sculpture would be moved to a shady corner.That's the opinion of a panel of architects who met over the past two days to overhaul the entrance to the Garmatz federal courthouse, the hulking concrete structure on Lombard Street that houses the U.S. District Court.The proposed design change moves "Baltimore Federal," a piece of multicolored metal art that has long been a brunt of jokes, sneers and scorn.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
For two decades, few people have understood the multicolored metal sculpture outside Baltimore's federal courthouse. Even fewer have liked it.As workers at the Edward A. Garmatz federal courthouse finished dismantling "Baltimore Federal" yesterday and sent it away for a five-month makeover, many who work at the building expressed hope it would never return."
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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | November 18, 2001
It sounds like John Waters-meets-bad-science-fiction: The Invasion of the 50-Foot She-Male. But that's just one way of thinking about the gender-bending artwork proposed for the plaza in front of Baltimore's Pennsylvania Station: Jonathan Borofsky's Male / Female, a 51-foot-tall burnished aluminum sculpture of intersecting human figures -- one female and one male -- with a common red neon heart. It also can be seen as a three-dimensional manifesto about human rights, or a peace symbol for troubled times.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 21, 1995
The proposal to remove the George Sugarman sculpture from the plaza outside the U. S. District Courthouse downtown is as wrong-headed as was the attempt to prevent it from being put there in the first place, two decades ago.The sculpture belongs where it is. Removing it would set a terrible example. And the reason given -- that it's a security risk -- is a far-fetched fear, being used as an excuse to get rid of a piece of art that some people simply don't like -- just as it was back then.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 20, 2001
In Baltimore City Fleeing man shot by police during exchange of gunfire A Southeast Baltimore man, 23, who was shot in the foot by police late Monday was being held without bail on attempted-murder, assault and handgun charges yesterday, police said. The man had just left his home in the 100 block of N. Bradford St., when a policeman, suspecting that the man was armed, approached him. The man fled down an alley and fired several shots as two additional officers gave chase, police said.
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