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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 14, 2002
George Stephanopoulos is smart, handsome, famous and popular - all desirable attributes in a budding star of the network news world. As Stephanopoulos makes his debut tomorrow as the new anchor of ABC's Sunday public affairs show This Week, however, there are two people who could stand in the way of his success. There's Tim Russert, the boisterous NBC News Washington bureau chief who is host of rival Meet the Press. Then there's George Stephanopoulos, the smart, handsome, famous and popular former aide to Bill Clinton.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- No wonder President Bush and Sen. John Kerry, Democrat of Massachusetts, show so much contempt for each other. They have so much in common. Both went to Yale. Both belonged to the elite Skull and Bones. Both have political candidates in their own parties quickly running away from them. Mr. Kerry had to cancel campaign trips after he famously "botched" a joke intended to jab Mr. Bush. He meant to say that people who don't succeed in school "get us stuck in Iraq." Instead, he omitted the "us" and said "get stuck in Iraq," making it sound like he was ridiculing U.S. troops who, sad to say, are stuck in Iraq.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and By David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | March 21, 1999
"All Too Human: A Political Education," by George Stephanopoulos. Little, Brown. 456 pages. $27.95.Former Clinton insider George Stephanopoulos has written a book that's very different from the buzz surrounding it.To hear such veterans of earlier administrations as Richard Goodwin, Carl Rowan, and Jack Valenti tell it, Stephanopoulos has betrayed his ex-boss for a reputed $2.7 million advance.But Bill Clinton has been so thoroughly sliced and diced that the most newsworthy "dish" Stephanopoulos serves up is about himself.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | September 14, 2002
George Stephanopoulos is smart, handsome, famous and popular - all desirable attributes in a budding star of the network news world. As Stephanopoulos makes his debut tomorrow as the new anchor of ABC's Sunday public affairs show This Week, however, there are two people who could stand in the way of his success. There's Tim Russert, the boisterous NBC News Washington bureau chief who is host of rival Meet the Press. Then there's George Stephanopoulos, the smart, handsome, famous and popular former aide to Bill Clinton.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Bill Clinton prides himself on being the boy from Hope, Ark., the down-home Democrat who eschews the trappings of the Imperial Presidency.Nonetheless, the White House acknowledged yesterday, Mr. Clinton kept Air Force One sitting on the tarmac at Los Angeles International Airport on Tuesday while he treated himself to a haircut by Cristophe of Beverly Hills, hairdresser to the stars.Meanwhile, two of the airport's four runways were shut down for 56 minutes, delaying at least one commuter flight from Yuma, Ariz.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
Members of the Maryland chapter of the Rainbow Coalition yesterday criticized public officials from the president to the mayor of Annapolis for failing to speak out on behalf of six black Secret Service agents who allegedly were denied service at the Annapolis Denny's last month.State Del. Salima Siler Marriott of Baltimore and Annapolis Alderman Carl O. Snowden stood in front of Denny's with members of the grass-roots organization Peace-Action and city residents who also allege discriminatory treatment at the restaurant.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The cover of Time magazine this week has a morose picture of Bill Clinton holding a hand to his head while George Stephanopoulos, his baby-faced adviser, stands over him with a grim expression on his lips.Norman Rockwell might have titled it: The Night Junior Wrecked the Car.For a brief interlude, there had been good news at the White House: Clinton's performance at last week's press conference had boosted his poll ratings.But Clinton and his Whitewater land deal are still being investigated by all sorts of people.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman and Thomas L. Friedman,New York Times News Service | January 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration, confronting a new round of huge layoffs in some leading U.S. industries, said yesterday that the president was likely to propose $15 billion to $20 billion in additional federal spending this year to stimulate job growth.Since the election, President Clinton's economic advisers have been debating how much, if any, new spending and tax credits they should propose to create jobs and how that increased spending should be coupled with longer-term measures to shrink the federal budget deficit.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- You could see the emotions race across Zoe Baird's face the moment she walked into the Senate hearing room.On Tuesday, when Bill Clinton's choice for attorney general had to face the Judiciary Committee for the first time, she was nervous, but that was understandable.Everybody knew she had broken the law by hiring illegal aliens and she knew she would be questioned about it.But by yesterday, the second day of the hearings, Baird's nervousness had been replaced by other emotions: fear, depression and a small amount of combativeness.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | November 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- No wonder President Bush and Sen. John Kerry, Democrat of Massachusetts, show so much contempt for each other. They have so much in common. Both went to Yale. Both belonged to the elite Skull and Bones. Both have political candidates in their own parties quickly running away from them. Mr. Kerry had to cancel campaign trips after he famously "botched" a joke intended to jab Mr. Bush. He meant to say that people who don't succeed in school "get us stuck in Iraq." Instead, he omitted the "us" and said "get stuck in Iraq," making it sound like he was ridiculing U.S. troops who, sad to say, are stuck in Iraq.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and By David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | March 21, 1999
"All Too Human: A Political Education," by George Stephanopoulos. Little, Brown. 456 pages. $27.95.Former Clinton insider George Stephanopoulos has written a book that's very different from the buzz surrounding it.To hear such veterans of earlier administrations as Richard Goodwin, Carl Rowan, and Jack Valenti tell it, Stephanopoulos has betrayed his ex-boss for a reputed $2.7 million advance.But Bill Clinton has been so thoroughly sliced and diced that the most newsworthy "dish" Stephanopoulos serves up is about himself.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1996
WASHINGTON -- For Bob Dole, it may be now or never.The presidential debates, starting tonight at 9 p.m., offer the Republican his best opportunity to seize the initiative in his challenge against President Clinton."
NEWS
By DAVID KUSNET and DAVID KUSNET,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1996
In Washington's political and journalistic circles, the talk is all about "Primary Colors," a thinly disguised account of Bill Clinton's long march to the Democratic presidential nomination.Sure, you've heard the media buzz: This book is such a dead-on portrait of the Clintons that it could only have been written by an insider.Washington's conventional wisdom is wrong.Except for flashes of insight about New York politics and the gritty realities of urban schools and union halls, which suggest that it was written by a street-smart, iconoclastic New Yorker, there's little that couldn't have been culled from a data base of the mainstream media and a pile of old supermarket tabloids.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | September 27, 1994
AT LUNCH they sat talking in a booth at the restaurant across from their office building, three women in soft suits, somewhere between their Wunderkind days and middle age.Because of their jobs, they didn't want to be identified any more specifically than that; they were even afraid to see their line of work in print.For they had been waxing sarcastic about the "white boys": that is, the men who run the company. The chairman, the president, the vice presidents -- except for the V.P. for human resources, that being the designated female job. The big guys, the ones who make the decisions and the policy and who have no women or minorities in their ranks.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 30, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The cover of Time magazine this week has a morose picture of Bill Clinton holding a hand to his head while George Stephanopoulos, his baby-faced adviser, stands over him with a grim expression on his lips.Norman Rockwell might have titled it: The Night Junior Wrecked the Car.For a brief interlude, there had been good news at the White House: Clinton's performance at last week's press conference had boosted his poll ratings.But Clinton and his Whitewater land deal are still being investigated by all sorts of people.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 5, 1994
Everyone agrees that the land deal between Bill and Hillary Rodham Clinton and one of their Arkansas cronies is very, very complicated.It involves vacation property in the Ozarks called Whitewater, a failed bank that cost the taxpayers millions, documents spirited away into the night and now demands that an independent counsel be appointed to investigate the matter.But as complicated as the mess is -- and how soon before we start calling it Whitewatergate? -- the Clintons' defense has been very, very simple:They lost money on the deal, so it had to be honest.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | September 27, 1994
AT LUNCH they sat talking in a booth at the restaurant across from their office building, three women in soft suits, somewhere between their Wunderkind days and middle age.Because of their jobs, they didn't want to be identified any more specifically than that; they were even afraid to see their line of work in print.For they had been waxing sarcastic about the "white boys": that is, the men who run the company. The chairman, the president, the vice presidents -- except for the V.P. for human resources, that being the designated female job. The big guys, the ones who make the decisions and the policy and who have no women or minorities in their ranks.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | October 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton entered office with the job of charting America's foreign policy beyond the Cold War. Nine months later, a series of self-inflicted wounds to his prestige has hobbled his efforts, raising questions about his ability to project force credibly abroad.Doubts about the American leader's competence in world affairs -- overseas, on Capitol Hill and among the public -- are high. In a recent Gallup poll, approval of the president's handling of foreign affairs dropped from 51 percent to 40 percent.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
Members of the Maryland chapter of the Rainbow Coalition yesterday criticized public officials from the president to the mayor of Annapolis for failing to speak out on behalf of six black Secret Service agents who allegedly were denied service at the Annapolis Denny's last month.State Del. Salima Siler Marriott of Baltimore and Annapolis Alderman Carl O. Snowden stood in front of Denny's with members of the grass-roots organization Peace-Action and city residents who also allege discriminatory treatment at the restaurant.
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