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By Crystal Williams | July 5, 2000
Each landing, opposite the lift-shaft, the poster with the enormous face gazed from the wall. It was one of those pictures, which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran."- from Chapter One of "Nineteen Eighty-Four," by George Orwell When CBS' "Big Brother" takes to the airwaves tonight, George Orwell might be turning over in his grave: His nightmarish vision of a totalitarian future has been co-opted as the inspiration for a much-anticipated TV game show.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
George Orwell appears to have gotten half the future right in 1984 .  The world of Big Brother aptly foretells the surveillance state that is watching all of us today. But Orwell's fears about Newspeak, that a totalitarian society could limit human thought by restricting language, failed to take into account the irresistible processes of subversion and change in language. (Or the prevalence of irony. As they used to sum up the essence of the Soviet system, "We pretend to work and they pretend to pay us. ")
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NEWS
April 9, 2013
I'm sure George Orwell is looking down at the Associated Press and saying, "I wasn't exaggerating was I?" ("AP makes 'illegals' illegal," April 6). At the AP they're saying to themselves, why don't we next replace "shoplifter" with "non-paying shopper?" Being progressive sure makes you feel better. Ken Waters, Berlin
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | December 16, 2013
Christmas is nine days away, and if you're looking for presents, well, you still have time. When it comes to becoming educated on conservatism and Maryland, books are a very effective way to show somebody that you care enough about them and our state and country to arm them with the necessary knowledge and motivation to get involved in the community. So here are some books that I would recommend as great stocking stuffers:   The Conscience of a Conservative by Barry Goldwater : The gold standard of conservative philosophy and thought, Senator Goldwater's book stands up more than 50 years after it was published.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
I'm a bit late, but I would like to lend my support to Melvin A. Goodman for his commentary regarding whistle-blowers ("We need more whistle-blowers," June 23). Whistle-blowers can make contributions toward better government. But now our government is making it too dangerous for most people to even think of doing this; we have become fearful of the consequences of criticizing our own government. "Dissent is patriotic" is to some degree no longer tolerated. I have recently heard that sales of George Orwell's "1984," in which "Big Brother" is constantly watching, have soared.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | May 5, 2001
Saturday highlights "Brazil," 1 p.m. at the Charles. Terry Gilliam's cockeyed masterpiece, about a future more perverse than anything George Orwell ever imagined, went largely unseen when it was released in 1985. Do your part in righting that wrong. "Rediscovering George Washington," 1 p.m. at the Charles. Here's a tough decision: "Brazil" or this documentary on America's first president, from Montgomery County resident Michael Pack, whose "The Fall of Newt Gingrich" was a highlight of MFF 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 1, 1993
What a difference a day makes!If "Flirting" had opened yesterday instead of today, it might have made my top 10 list. It's terrific: a wily, compassionate story of teen life, Australian-style, prep school-style, that treats its young performers with respect, yet finds the delirious comedy in their lives while it watches as they grapple to become adults.It's so full of eccentrics, it has to be autobiographical: Nobody, not even John Duigan, could make this stuff up. And, of course, he didn't; the film is part of a trilogy of his own life, two-thirds of which Duigan has completed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norman Birnbaum and Norman Birnbaum,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
The Cold War and the 20th century are over; new fears and quandaries beset us. George Orwell, however, is still with us. To think of politics in Great Britain and the United States is to recall his legacy. His belief that writing is giving one's word, that politics requires truthfulness, attests to his inexpungable Protestantism. He bore witness to democracy's torments, intellectuals' responsibilities and history's disappointments. Five years as a British policeman in occupied Burma gave Orwell experience of empire.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 18, 1996
PARIS -- A characteristic problem of this generation is that it doesn't seem to understand what it was like for any other generation. Anachronism rules. Every figure from the past is held accountable for not thinking and acting as right-minded people do today.We saw this in 1992, on the 500th anniversary of Columbus' voyage, when the great navigator was excoriated as an imperialist and racist, responsible for genocide, even though imperialism, racism and genocide are concepts that were unknown in the 15th century.
NEWS
By Brian Murray | January 19, 1992
ORWELL: THE AUTHORIZED BIOGRAPHY.Michael Shelden.HarperCollins.497 pages. $25. As he lay dying of tuberculosis in 1950, George Orwell, 46, added to his will a few simple requests. He wanted to be buried "according to the rites of the Church of England in the nearest convenient cemetery." And he asked "that no memorial service be held after my death and that no biography shall be written."Orwell was, in fact, buried beneath a modest headstone in a country churchyard close to the Thames.His second request remained honored until the early 1970s, when two Americans -- Peter Stansky and William Abrahams -- published "The Unknown Orwell," covering the childhood and early adolescence of one Eric Blair, the son of a former governess and a bureaucrat in Britain's colonial system.
NEWS
July 14, 2013
I'm a bit late, but I would like to lend my support to Melvin A. Goodman for his commentary regarding whistle-blowers ("We need more whistle-blowers," June 23). Whistle-blowers can make contributions toward better government. But now our government is making it too dangerous for most people to even think of doing this; we have become fearful of the consequences of criticizing our own government. "Dissent is patriotic" is to some degree no longer tolerated. I have recently heard that sales of George Orwell's "1984," in which "Big Brother" is constantly watching, have soared.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
I'm sure George Orwell is looking down at the Associated Press and saying, "I wasn't exaggerating was I?" ("AP makes 'illegals' illegal," April 6). At the AP they're saying to themselves, why don't we next replace "shoplifter" with "non-paying shopper?" Being progressive sure makes you feel better. Ken Waters, Berlin
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 29, 2006
The Party said that Oceania had never been in alliance with Eurasia. He, Winston Smith, knew that Oceania had been in alliance with Eurasia as short a time as four years ago. But where did that knowledge exist? Only in his own consciousness, which in any case must soon be annihilated. And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed - if all records told the same tale - then the lie passed into history and became truth. "Who controls the past," ran the Party slogan, "controls the future: Who controls the present controls the past."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norman Birnbaum and Norman Birnbaum,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
The Cold War and the 20th century are over; new fears and quandaries beset us. George Orwell, however, is still with us. To think of politics in Great Britain and the United States is to recall his legacy. His belief that writing is giving one's word, that politics requires truthfulness, attests to his inexpungable Protestantism. He bore witness to democracy's torments, intellectuals' responsibilities and history's disappointments. Five years as a British policeman in occupied Burma gave Orwell experience of empire.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dinitia Smith and By Dinitia Smith,NEW YORK TIMES | December 1, 2002
What if Snowball had his chance? An American novelist has written a parody of Animal Farm, George Orwell's 1945 allegory about the evils of communism, in which the exiled pig, Snowball, returns to the farm and sets up a capitalist state, leading to misery for all the animals. The book, Snowball's Chance by John Reed, has just been published by Roof Books, a small independent press in New York. And the estate of George Orwell is not happy about it. William Hamilton, the British literary executor of the Orwell estate, objected to the parody in an e-mail message to the James T. Sherry, the publisher of Roof Books, stating, "The contemporary setting can only trivialize the tragedy of Orwell's mid-020th-century vision of totalitarianism."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | May 5, 2001
Saturday highlights "Brazil," 1 p.m. at the Charles. Terry Gilliam's cockeyed masterpiece, about a future more perverse than anything George Orwell ever imagined, went largely unseen when it was released in 1985. Do your part in righting that wrong. "Rediscovering George Washington," 1 p.m. at the Charles. Here's a tough decision: "Brazil" or this documentary on America's first president, from Montgomery County resident Michael Pack, whose "The Fall of Newt Gingrich" was a highlight of MFF 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dinitia Smith and By Dinitia Smith,NEW YORK TIMES | December 1, 2002
What if Snowball had his chance? An American novelist has written a parody of Animal Farm, George Orwell's 1945 allegory about the evils of communism, in which the exiled pig, Snowball, returns to the farm and sets up a capitalist state, leading to misery for all the animals. The book, Snowball's Chance by John Reed, has just been published by Roof Books, a small independent press in New York. And the estate of George Orwell is not happy about it. William Hamilton, the British literary executor of the Orwell estate, objected to the parody in an e-mail message to the James T. Sherry, the publisher of Roof Books, stating, "The contemporary setting can only trivialize the tragedy of Orwell's mid-020th-century vision of totalitarianism."
NEWS
By Jeffrey M. Landaw and Jeffrey M. Landaw,Mr. Landaw is a makeup editor for The Sun | May 26, 1991
A LINE OUT FOR A WALK: FAMILIAR ESSAYS.Joseph Epstein.Norton.331 pages. $21.95.If essayists were baseball players, Joseph Epstein would be an unspectacular but always successful control pitcher like the old Yankees' Ed Lopat.After more than 15 years, readers like me know well enough what to expect from him -- the self-deprecation that skates close to the edge of false modesty but never falls in, the deadpan passage that swerves into a striking figure of speech -- but the turns still work as well as ever.
FEATURES
By Crystal Williams | July 5, 2000
Each landing, opposite the lift-shaft, the poster with the enormous face gazed from the wall. It was one of those pictures, which are so contrived that the eyes follow you about when you move. BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran."- from Chapter One of "Nineteen Eighty-Four," by George Orwell When CBS' "Big Brother" takes to the airwaves tonight, George Orwell might be turning over in his grave: His nightmarish vision of a totalitarian future has been co-opted as the inspiration for a much-anticipated TV game show.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | July 18, 1996
PARIS -- A characteristic problem of this generation is that it doesn't seem to understand what it was like for any other generation. Anachronism rules. Every figure from the past is held accountable for not thinking and acting as right-minded people do today.We saw this in 1992, on the 500th anniversary of Columbus' voyage, when the great navigator was excoriated as an imperialist and racist, responsible for genocide, even though imperialism, racism and genocide are concepts that were unknown in the 15th century.
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