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October 26, 2012
Sunday, Oct. 21, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern. Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition. In 1977, following extensive public hearings, McGovern's Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today's Dietary Guidelines. It marked the first time that a U.S. government document recommended reduced meat consumption.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 28, 2012
One guy was among the greatest losers in the history of politics, the other, one of the biggest winners in all of sports. They were unalike men who shared little except recent headlines. But there was, in that brief juxtaposition, an object lesson for those who cared to see it. The loser -- George McGovern -- made headlines by dying at age 90. He is famous for having been on the rump end of one of the most thorough election shellackings in history, cobbling together a measly 17 electoral votes in 1972 to Richard Nixon's 520. But there was more to him than that epic loss.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 26, 2012
Inevitably, in all the tributes to former Sen. George McGovern upon his death at 90, his landslide defeat in the 1972 presidential election at the hands of Richard Nixon shared top billing with his fights against America's misguided wars in Vietnam and Iraq. That political loss was undeniably historic in that he won only resolutely Democratic Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. But it also was ironic in that despite Mr. McGovern's warnings on the campaign trail of Nixon's malfeasance in the still-unraveling Watergate scandal, the voters chose a crook over a man of unchallenged honesty.
EXPLORE
October 26, 2012
Sunday, Oct. 21, we lost former U.S. Sen. George McGovern. Although many will recall his disastrous 1972 loss to Richard Nixon and his subsequent leadership in getting us out of Vietnam, his truly lasting legacy will be his war on hunger and malnutrition. In 1977, following extensive public hearings, McGovern's Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs published Dietary Goals for the United States, a precursor to today's Dietary Guidelines. It marked the first time that a U.S. government document recommended reduced meat consumption.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | May 24, 1991
THERE WERE fighting words from George McGovern in his speech announcing his intentions for 1992, but perhaps because he had decided not to make the fight himself this time, his call to arms to his party lacked the fire that usually marks the kickoff of a presidential campaign.In announcing that he would not seek the Democratic nomination, McGovern hammered President Bush and the Republicans almost as if he were delivering an acceptance speech at a nominating convention, full of applause lines: "If you want a president who takes the low road to our highest office, George Bush is your man . . . If you want a president so careless that he keeps Dan Quayle one heartbeat from the presidency, George Bush is your man . . . If you want a president who built up Manuel Noriega and Saddam Hussein and then led the nation into destructive wars against the dictators he himself had helped to arm, then George Bush is your man. . . ."
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
WASHINGTON -- One expects tragedy to reveal itself in the face: to deepen its lines, twist the features. One expects it to appear somewhere, and there it is: It stares from the tired, joyless eyes of George McGovern.Except for those sad eyes he has not changed much. He is 73; he has aged well. He is tanned, his hair is light still and a little wispy. He smiles, friendly, only with his upper teeth. But that is enough to fish up the memory of Senator George McGovern's surprising, exuberant and quixotic quest for the presidency a quarter of a century ago when he carried the Democratic Party's standard against Richard Nixon.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
In memory of George McGovern, we should not forget that he was a GI ("Liberal icon fought Nixon, Vietnam War," Oct. 22). Originally, GI stood for General Issue, but it came to represent the men and women who wore a uniform in service to their country. At the end of World War II, these people were disgusted with killing, maiming, deforming, wasting, etc. With the assistance of the several parts of the GI Bill, they tried to make sure it didn't happen again. The death of George McGovern should not end his efforts or end the efforts of millions of his compatriots to ensure peace and tranquillity.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | July 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- They always love you when you get old. And no longer can do them any harm.So this week the Democratic Party loves George McGovern.Four years ago, McGovern sat in the balcony of the Omni convention hall in Atlanta on the last night the Democratic convention. Down below, Michael Dukakis, the glow of victory lighting up his face, accepted his party's nomination.And then Dukakis summoned the VIPs of the party -- past, present and future -- to the podium to share his glory.One by one, they came down and crowded the stage until there were a score, two score, a hundred of them standing there and waving to the roaring crowd.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
When I attended the College Park campus of the University of Maryland from 1968 to1972, it was the height of the Vietnam War.As a Republican and supporter of Richard Nixon, I sometimes felt very lonely when we discussed politics. often. In fact, it was Nixon's strong stance in foreign affairs that attracted me to the Republican Party in the first place, along with the near-isolationist philosophy of the Democrats.Given that, you can imagine the slow burn I've been doing the past two months as many Republicans in Congress are starting to sound like George McGovern over the war in the Balkans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and By Glenn McNatt,Sun Staff | August 5, 2001
The Wild Blue: The Men and Boys Who Flew The B-24s Over Germany, by Stephen E. Ambrose. Simon & Schuster. 299 pages. $26. It looked like a truck, hauled like a truck and, according to the pilots who wrestled it through fighters and flak over enemy territory, flew like a truck. The Consolidated B-24 Liberator was not the most famous American bomber of World War II -- that was the legendary B-17 Flying Fortress -- but it was the backbone of the U.S Army Air Force's strategic air campaign in Europe.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 26, 2012
Inevitably, in all the tributes to former Sen. George McGovern upon his death at 90, his landslide defeat in the 1972 presidential election at the hands of Richard Nixon shared top billing with his fights against America's misguided wars in Vietnam and Iraq. That political loss was undeniably historic in that he won only resolutely Democratic Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. But it also was ironic in that despite Mr. McGovern's warnings on the campaign trail of Nixon's malfeasance in the still-unraveling Watergate scandal, the voters chose a crook over a man of unchallenged honesty.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
In memory of George McGovern, we should not forget that he was a GI ("Liberal icon fought Nixon, Vietnam War," Oct. 22). Originally, GI stood for General Issue, but it came to represent the men and women who wore a uniform in service to their country. At the end of World War II, these people were disgusted with killing, maiming, deforming, wasting, etc. With the assistance of the several parts of the GI Bill, they tried to make sure it didn't happen again. The death of George McGovern should not end his efforts or end the efforts of millions of his compatriots to ensure peace and tranquillity.
NEWS
By Alex Clearfield | October 22, 2012
Former Utah governor Jon Huntsman, a Republican, spoke at Johns Hopkins University last week. He mostly avoided partisan politics, instead focusing on the roles of China and technology in determining America's future. However, he did address his failed presidential campaign, noting that his serving as ambassador to China under President Barack Obama hurt his standing with conservatives. To thunderous applause, Mr. Huntsman said (and I paraphrase), "No matter your party, when your president calls on you to serve, you do it. " This sentiment is anathema to many of our government officials today.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 20, 2012
Being a losing presidential candidate is like what Mr. Dooley said about vice presidents: "It isn't a crime exactly. You can't be sint to jail f'r it, but it's kind iv a disgrace. It's like writin' anonymous letters. " So it has been, unfairly, for former Sen. George McGovern of South Dakota, the Democratic presidential nominee of 1972 who went down to landslide defeat at the hands of, of all people, Richard Nixon in the very year of the infamous Watergate break-in. Mr. McGovern has just celebrated his 90th birthday, having gone on from that humiliating setback to a later-life career as U.S. ambassador to the UN Food and Agricultural Agencies and then as UN global ambassador on world hunger.
NEWS
By Patrick Whelan and Kathleen Kennedy Townsend | January 23, 2011
The country lost a very devout and public Catholic when Sargent Shriver passed away this past week, with a tremendous outpouring of affection evident at his funeral yesterday in Potomac's Our Lady of Mercy Church. He believed deeply in non-violence and social justice and was involved in launching a dizzying array of programs that put those beliefs into action. Between the Peace Corps and the Special Olympics, which was a lifelong labor of love with his wife Eunice, he touched the lives of hundreds of millions of people.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 13, 2004
WASHINGTON - With the two major party conventions over, now comes the debate over debates, that quadrennial hassle among the corner men for the presidential nominees for advantages large and small in the critical face-offs that could well decide the outcome of the election. The private Commission on Presidential Debates has proposed three presidential debates and one vice presidential debate, but the. Bush campaign reportedly is expected to insist on only two between the incumbent and Democratic nominee John Kerry.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | April 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- At the National Archives the other day the 1972 Democratic presidential nominee, George McGovern, sat in a front row for nearly seven hours as a series of academics and political figures reviewed his long public career.''It's like advancing your own funeral service,'' he said with a wry grin during daylong symposium commemorating his 75th birthday in July.But unlike a real funeral service, full of excessive praise and exaggeration of virtues, this retrospective of a man still going strong painted a George McGovern of shortcomings as well as achievements.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 10, 1991
Washington -- A VINTAGE liberal Democrat from Ne Hampshire -- you know the type, she supported Eugene McCarthy in 1968, George McGovern in 1972, Morris Udall in 1976, Ted Kennedy in 1980 -- said the other day that she was thinking about backing Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa for the 1992 Democratic presidential nomination. Then she added: "Unless, of course, Cuomo runs."This is the name of the game in the Democratic Party today, waiting for Mario Cuomo to decide whether he will be a candidate. No other single decision has the potential to shape the campaign -- and perhaps the health of the party -- in the next decade.
TOPIC
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 28, 2003
WASHINGTON - If the rags-to-riches story line of Howard Dean's campaign strikes movie producer Gerald Rafshoon as a sequel, there's a reason: He had a big hand in scripting the original. As Jimmy Carter's adman, Rafshoon helped an obscure former governor run a successful outsider campaign for president. Now, he's trying to do it again. "This is the perfect year for a Jimmy Carter-type campaign," said Rafshoon, who has been advising Dean's campaign. Dean became the Democratic front-runner (and still is, despite polls showing retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark in first place)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - George McGovern, the liberal Democrat who ran against President Richard Nixon in 1972 and lost every state except Massachusetts and the District of Columbia, is a quiet man not given to invectives or I-told-you-sos. For the nearly 31 years since he went down to dismal defeat trying to convince American voters that the Vietnam War was a wrongheaded effort and that Mr. Nixon was involved in the Watergate scandal of the same year, Mr. McGovern has pretty much held his tongue about those two correct assessments.
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