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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
He ignored the warm, steady rain that slicked his full beard to his face. He tuned out the crowd in the bleachers. He didn't glance across the stage at his foe, the ex-U.S. champ he was about to fight for a title he'd coveted 30 years. He never thought of the trip to Galway, Ireland, that hung in the balance.No, for two minutes and 19 seconds, George Hastings saw oysters and -shucked -- lancing and scooping in a Zen-like rhythm -- until his trusty Chesapeake stabber had dispatched eight, 16, and finally the two dozen oysters the judges had set before him. "I only won by seven seconds," marvels Hastings, 44, a Baltimore native, of the national oyster-shucking championship he netted last month.
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By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
A Florida man repeated Sunday as champion of the U.S. National Oyster Shucking Contest held in St. Mary's County. The 2010 champion, Michael Martin, of Panama City Beach, won again, based on how quickly and completely he shucked 24 oysters, according to Beverly Brown, administrator of the St. Mary's County Oyster Festival. George Hastings of Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood at Baltimore's Cross Street Market finished in third place, Brown said. The victory qualifies Martin to compete in the world championships at the Galway International Oyster & Seafood Festival in Ireland next fall.
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By SLOANE BROWN | March 11, 2007
Talk about a party that was full of heart. Sure, Harbor Hearts: The 23rd annual Heart of Baltimore Gala helped raise money for the American Heart Association. But for many who attended, the cause was a personal one. Guests and members of the event committee talked about how they were personally affected by heart disease and stroke. "In our first meeting, we went around the table, and everybody had a story to tell," said committee member Melissa Myers. "My mother had a heart attack two months ago," said fellow committee member Barbie Hargrave, adding that her mom is doing well.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | March 11, 2007
Talk about a party that was full of heart. Sure, Harbor Hearts: The 23rd annual Heart of Baltimore Gala helped raise money for the American Heart Association. But for many who attended, the cause was a personal one. Guests and members of the event committee talked about how they were personally affected by heart disease and stroke. "In our first meeting, we went around the table, and everybody had a story to tell," said committee member Melissa Myers. "My mother had a heart attack two months ago," said fellow committee member Barbie Hargrave, adding that her mom is doing well.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2000
The hours, the weeks, the years he slaved for this: It all paid off. The practice, the sacrifice, the highs and lows and in-betweens, the labor and loyalty and love of the game. George Hastings, Baltimore legend, pictures himself in the opening ceremonies and takes it all in. His mind goes back to the hours he spent after school, the Saturday mornings eyeing the masters, captivated by their grace and skill. It goes to those evenings as a young man, learning the subtler talents - aim and rhythm, pacing and style - that one day brought him win after win. Yes, it all paid off, he thinks as he imagines himself in the parade, hoisting the flag - the Star-Spangled Banner - for the people of many nations to see. George Hastings, mild-mannered highway engineer from Severn, doesn't pole-vault or sprint, doesn't hurdle or swim.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
A Florida man repeated Sunday as champion of the U.S. National Oyster Shucking Contest held in St. Mary's County. The 2010 champion, Michael Martin, of Panama City Beach, won again, based on how quickly and completely he shucked 24 oysters, according to Beverly Brown, administrator of the St. Mary's County Oyster Festival. George Hastings of Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood at Baltimore's Cross Street Market finished in third place, Brown said. The victory qualifies Martin to compete in the world championships at the Galway International Oyster & Seafood Festival in Ireland next fall.
NEWS
December 29, 2003
On December 27, 2003, PATRICIA; beloved wife of the late John F. Hastings Sr., devoted mother of Marie Anderson and her husband Jeff Sr., John F. Hastings Jr., and his wife Sharon, George E. Hastings Sr. and his wife Marylyn and Rob hastings and his partner Cliff Franklyn; dear sister of Nancy Kottmair and Barbara Fillman; loving grandmother of Shannon Klemm, Patty White, Jeffrey Anderson Jr., Kyle Hastings, George Hastings Jr. and Melissa Hastings; dear...
NEWS
November 14, 2003
On November 13, 2003, JOHN F. SR., beloved husband of Patricia Hastings; devoted father of Marie Anderson and her husband Jeff Sr., John F. Hastings, Jr., and his wife Sharon, George E. Hastings, Sr., and his wife Marilyn and Rob Hastings and his partner Cliff Franklyn; loving grandfather of Shannon Klemm, Patty white, Jeffrey Anderson, Jr., Kyle Hastings, George Hastings, Jr., and Melissa Hastings; dear great-grandfather of Amber, Christopher, Bradley, Daisy,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
The Manor Tavern in Monkton is teaming up with the Oyster Recovery Partnership for a Sunday afternoon Oyster Festival. The event will feature more than 20 types of different oysters, shucked by Maryland and World Champion Oyster Shucker George Hastings. The Oyster Festival will include displays of local arts and crafts, children's activities -- including a pirate ship moon, bounce -- and live bluegrass music by Slim Pickinz. Smyth Jewelers has donated a pearl necklace and earrings, raffle tickets are $15 with all the proceeds benefiting the Oyster Recovery Partnership . Admission to the Oyster Festival at Manor Tavern is free.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 14, 2001
A half-hour before the 5th Regiment Armory doors opened, the vestibule was packed with folks, noses pressed against inner door windows. Inside the huge hall, rows of meat slicers and mountains of bread loaves stood at the ready. Getting a head start, a flank of oyster shuckers pried open the gnarled shells revealing a treasure trove of glistening gastronomic jewels ripe for plunder. At noon, the Rotary Club of Baltimore's annual oyster roast officially opened and the charge began. Some 2,750 folks poured into the armory -- arming themselves with shellfish, pit-beef sandwiches and buckets of beer.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2000
The hours, the weeks, the years he slaved for this: It all paid off. The practice, the sacrifice, the highs and lows and in-betweens, the labor and loyalty and love of the game. George Hastings, Baltimore legend, pictures himself in the opening ceremonies and takes it all in. His mind goes back to the hours he spent after school, the Saturday mornings eyeing the masters, captivated by their grace and skill. It goes to those evenings as a young man, learning the subtler talents - aim and rhythm, pacing and style - that one day brought him win after win. Yes, it all paid off, he thinks as he imagines himself in the parade, hoisting the flag - the Star-Spangled Banner - for the people of many nations to see. George Hastings, mild-mannered highway engineer from Severn, doesn't pole-vault or sprint, doesn't hurdle or swim.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1999
He ignored the warm, steady rain that slicked his full beard to his face. He tuned out the crowd in the bleachers. He didn't glance across the stage at his foe, the ex-U.S. champ he was about to fight for a title he'd coveted 30 years. He never thought of the trip to Galway, Ireland, that hung in the balance.No, for two minutes and 19 seconds, George Hastings saw oysters and -shucked -- lancing and scooping in a Zen-like rhythm -- until his trusty Chesapeake stabber had dispatched eight, 16, and finally the two dozen oysters the judges had set before him. "I only won by seven seconds," marvels Hastings, 44, a Baltimore native, of the national oyster-shucking championship he netted last month.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and By Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2000
GALWAY, Ireland - This 760-year-old city on the Atlantic Ocean is one of the last strongholds of Gaelic culture, and for centuries, no word has been more central to Gaels than "craic." Pronounced "crack," it means the magical kinship people feel when having a wonderful time. After a lively bash, locals will trade a thumbs-up, nod to one another and say, "The craic was mighty, my friend." This week in Galway, at the 46th annual International Oyster Festival, the craic has been mighty indeed.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
GALWAY, Ireland - Here in western Ireland, the locals say, you can have all four seasons in the span of 10 minutes. This morning proves they aren't just slinging blarney. Sharp, slanting sunlight kindles the lawn in Father Burke Park to a shimmering green. As you cross the roiling River Corrib, an icy wind brings low, gray clouds. And by the time you reach the champ's hotel across town, a bone-soaking rain is falling - but the sky is brighter than a noonday sun. This isn't weather, you think; it's sorcery.
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