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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Irish Festival Everyone is invited to be Irish for the weekend at the 35th annual Maryland Irish Festival. The fun starts with special happy-hour pricing tonight, then continues through Saturday and Sunday with music, food, cultural exhibits and more. There's even an Irish Baking Contest, set for Sunday afternoon. (If you're an expert on soda bread and want to show off your baking talent to the masses, be sure to register by 2 p.m.) Here's betting there'll be plenty of things green.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Downloading movies and watching them on a computer is not for George Figgs, who has spent the better part of three decades affording Baltimore cinephiles the chance to experience films the way God intended - in the dark, projected onto a bigger-than-life screen, sharing the experience with a bunch of people whose only commonality is an urge to see how the on-screen story plays out. "I think people are tired of going to Netflix or Google or whatever, and...
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 7, 1999
The Orpheum in Fells Point will close Monday for renovations, owner George Figgs said this week. "The seats need to be fixed, the screen needs to be cleaned, the carpets need to be cleaned and changed," Figgs said of the tiny theater, which opened 10 years ago. Figgs added that he is exploring ways to re-open the theater -- which shows 16-millimeter prints of repertory, foreign and experimental movies -- as a nonprofit concern. "There will be an admission charge, and it will be subscription, too," Figgs said, adding that as a nonprofit, he would apply to foundations like the Abell Foundation for operating grants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | November 11, 2010
A murdered screenwriter who narrates from the grave. An idealistic script reader who thinks she can work her way up in a studio on smarts alone. A producer who would push a baseball project if he could turn it into a musical for a female star. Those are just the "normal" characters in "Sunset Boulevard," the anchor of the opening-day bill for "You Be Cinema," the University of Baltimore's new film series at UB's Student Center Performing Arts Theater, 21 W. Mount Royal Ave. Billy Wilder's coruscating pop tragedy, streaked with horror and black comedy, is still the ultimate Hollywood movie, 60 years after its premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Downloading movies and watching them on a computer is not for George Figgs, who has spent the better part of three decades affording Baltimore cinephiles the chance to experience films the way God intended - in the dark, projected onto a bigger-than-life screen, sharing the experience with a bunch of people whose only commonality is an urge to see how the on-screen story plays out. "I think people are tired of going to Netflix or Google or whatever, and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
A murdered screenwriter who narrates from the grave. An idealistic script reader who thinks she can work her way up in a studio on smarts alone. A producer who would push a baseball project if he could turn it into a musical for a female star. Those are just the "normal" characters in "Sunset Boulevard," the anchor of the opening-day bill for "You Be Cinema," the University of Baltimore's new film series at UB's Student Center Performing Arts Theater, 21 W. Mount Royal Ave. Billy Wilder's coruscating pop tragedy, streaked with horror and black comedy, is still the ultimate Hollywood movie, 60 years after its premiere.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday HTC and Ann Hornaday HTC,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 1998
Just when "L.A. Confidential," Curtis Hanson's adaptation of James Ellroy's novel, seems on its silky-smooth way to sweeping the Oscars, count on George Figgs to set the record straight about film noir.Figgs, the owner of the Orpheum Cinema in Fells Point and a self-described "film noir fanatic," has programmed a film that makes Hanson's rouged-up rendition of 1950s Los Angeles look like "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm.""The Crimson Kimono," a film by the master of pulp violence, Samuel Fuller, is the movie "L.A.
NEWS
January 7, 1996
"Winchell: Gossip, Power and the Culture of Celebrity," by Neal Gabler. It's brand new and a great book. It puts you on Broadway in the 1920s, the end of Vaudeville and yellow journalism. I've been reading biographies lately. I read both the Brandos, the first by Manso and then his version and Shirley Maclaine's.George Figgs, owner of theOrpheum Cinema, Fells Point
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 6, 1991
The American avant-garde has fallen into such ill repute since the halcyon cross-over days of Warhol that it rarely gets a display in a mainstream venue. That changes, at least for a week, beginning today at Fells Point's Orpheum Cinema, where owner George Figgs is launching an ambitious independent film festival.Running through Sunday, the festival features three rotating programs featuring works by filmmakers from Baltimore, New York and Boston. As Lawrence Welk used to say, "Folks, there's something for everybody."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Tess Russell and Chris Kaltenbach and Tess Russell,SUN STAFF WRITERS | June 11, 2003
This week, Baltimore's movie scene welcomes back two figures absent from its screens for too long: legendary Hollywood choreographer Busby Berkeley and legendary local cinephile George Figgs. Figgs, known to area movie fans as the operator of Fells Point's Orpheum theater until its closing in 1999, is bringing his love of old movies back to the masses. Tonight at the rejuvenated Patterson movie house, home to Highlandtown's Creative Alliance arts group, his weekly Orpheum Film Series kicks off with a screening of MGM's Million Dollar Mermaid.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Irish Festival Everyone is invited to be Irish for the weekend at the 35th annual Maryland Irish Festival. The fun starts with special happy-hour pricing tonight, then continues through Saturday and Sunday with music, food, cultural exhibits and more. There's even an Irish Baking Contest, set for Sunday afternoon. (If you're an expert on soda bread and want to show off your baking talent to the masses, be sure to register by 2 p.m.) Here's betting there'll be plenty of things green.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 7, 1999
The Orpheum in Fells Point will close Monday for renovations, owner George Figgs said this week. "The seats need to be fixed, the screen needs to be cleaned, the carpets need to be cleaned and changed," Figgs said of the tiny theater, which opened 10 years ago. Figgs added that he is exploring ways to re-open the theater -- which shows 16-millimeter prints of repertory, foreign and experimental movies -- as a nonprofit concern. "There will be an admission charge, and it will be subscription, too," Figgs said, adding that as a nonprofit, he would apply to foundations like the Abell Foundation for operating grants.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday HTC and Ann Hornaday HTC,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 1998
Just when "L.A. Confidential," Curtis Hanson's adaptation of James Ellroy's novel, seems on its silky-smooth way to sweeping the Oscars, count on George Figgs to set the record straight about film noir.Figgs, the owner of the Orpheum Cinema in Fells Point and a self-described "film noir fanatic," has programmed a film that makes Hanson's rouged-up rendition of 1950s Los Angeles look like "Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm.""The Crimson Kimono," a film by the master of pulp violence, Samuel Fuller, is the movie "L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | May 12, 2002
If you were into talking about movies, the Evergreen Carriage House was full of people doing that - at the Maryland Film Festival 2002 opening night party. Some 300 film fans helped themselves at the buffet and compared notes on that evening's screening of 10 short films at the Senator Theatre. Then, there were the discussions of which movies to try and catch over the festival's next three days. That kind of talk - by movie lovers rather than movie industry types - was exactly what had appealed to filmmaker John Walter.
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