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By Carl Rollyson and Carl Rollyson,Special to The Sun | June 18, 1995
"George Eliot: Voice of a Century," by Frederick R. Karl. Illustrated. 708 pages. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., $30Overdetermination, to use one of Frederick R. Karl's favorite words, is what characterizes his biography of George Eliot. Pattern, pattern everywhere and everything fits. She is a divided being, a voice of the century, because England is the same: evangelical and high church, reform-minded and reactionary. She adores authority; she abjures it.Well, his biography is not quite that schematic.
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NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley | April 15, 2007
THE GEORGE ELIOT COLLECTION -- BBC Warner / $49.98 She was a well-endowed blonde with little talent but starlet pretensions - and an unfortunate predilection for indulging in risky behaviors. While still in her 20s, she married an older, immensely wealthy man. His previous heirs accused the new wife of being a gold digger and a tart. There was scandal, and an untimely death. Anna Nicole Smith? Nope. Gwendolen Harleth, the heroine of George Eliot's strikingly modern, 1876 novel, Daniel Deronda.
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NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley | April 15, 2007
THE GEORGE ELIOT COLLECTION -- BBC Warner / $49.98 She was a well-endowed blonde with little talent but starlet pretensions - and an unfortunate predilection for indulging in risky behaviors. While still in her 20s, she married an older, immensely wealthy man. His previous heirs accused the new wife of being a gold digger and a tart. There was scandal, and an untimely death. Anna Nicole Smith? Nope. Gwendolen Harleth, the heroine of George Eliot's strikingly modern, 1876 novel, Daniel Deronda.
NEWS
June 18, 2006
Until I Find You By John Irving Ballantine Books / 825 pages / $15.95 For those who can't get enough of John Irving, there is a great deal to have of him here in a humongous novel about a man born to a tattoo-artist mother and an absconding, church-organist father. "Irving remains loyal to his models, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy," Joan Mellen wrote here last year. "Fiction for Irving, as for those masters, is biography, the full life of a protagonist, engaging if also substantially flawed."
NEWS
June 18, 2006
Until I Find You By John Irving Ballantine Books / 825 pages / $15.95 For those who can't get enough of John Irving, there is a great deal to have of him here in a humongous novel about a man born to a tattoo-artist mother and an absconding, church-organist father. "Irving remains loyal to his models, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Thomas Hardy," Joan Mellen wrote here last year. "Fiction for Irving, as for those masters, is biography, the full life of a protagonist, engaging if also substantially flawed."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 29, 2001
At your service: 18th-century comedy Washington's Kennedy Center begins its celebration of the arts of the United Kingdom on Tuesday with Carlo Goldoni's 18th-century comedy, "A Servant of Two Masters," co-produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company and London's Young Vic Theater Company. Goldoni's commedia dell'arte script has been adapted for this production by British playwright Lee Hall, screenwriter of "Billy Elliot." The other two theatrical components of the British festival are an adaptation of George Eliot's "The Mill on the Floss" (May 15-June 10)
NEWS
By Jonathan Rosen | October 25, 2004
NEW YORK - Twenty years ago, the Jewish Theological Seminary admitted women to its rabbinical school for the first time, reversing 2,000 years of Jewish practice. The Reform movement had preceded the seminary by more than a decade. But the Conservative movement, to which the seminary belongs, views itself as working within the traditional framework of Jewish law handed down from Sinai, and so its decision was perhaps even more dramatic, prompting much soul-searching and several defections from the school by revered members of the faculty.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | January 22, 1995
These days, we seem to be reading more about the lives of writers than their actual works. Many of us are probably more familiar with the relationships of Ernest Hemingway, C. S. Lewis and Emily Dickinson than with their books.Phyllis Rose, in her book "Parallel Lives," about five marriages during the Victorian era -- of Thomas Carlyle, John Ruskin, John Stuart Mill, Charles Dickens and George Eliot -- notes that while we may disdain gossip as small-minded, we are at the same time fascinated by it, for it helps to tell us how to live -- and how not to live.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2006
"Wear a smile and you have friends; wear a scowl and you have wrinkles." - George Eliot Inspired by age-old literary wisdom, countless song lyrics and the 1872 musings of Charles Darwin, a very 2006 theory to treat depression has emerged. Why not turn that frown upside down - with a shot of Botox? By preventing the physical act of frowning, the muscle-paralyzing toxin just might ease depression. A small-scale pilot trial, published in the May 15 journal Dermatologic Surgery, found that Botox injected into frown lines around the mouth or in forehead furrows of 10 women eliminated depression symptoms in nine of them and reduced symptoms in the 10th.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie | February 21, 1993
ANTHONY TROLLOPE.Victoria Glendinning.Knopf.551 pages. $30.Biographers face a formidable task, it seems. If they offer too many facts, if the level of detail extends to minutiae, the subject may appear dull and lifeless. If there are too few facts, too many breezy assumptions, the result is merely gossip and resemblance to the subject is purely cosmetic.There's another problem: Readers always know how the story comes out.So when a book comes along that portrays a main character so vividly he nearly strides off the pages, and presents the story of a life that ended in 1882 as a page-turner, the author must be doing something resoundingly right.
NEWS
By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2006
"Wear a smile and you have friends; wear a scowl and you have wrinkles." - George Eliot Inspired by age-old literary wisdom, countless song lyrics and the 1872 musings of Charles Darwin, a very 2006 theory to treat depression has emerged. Why not turn that frown upside down - with a shot of Botox? By preventing the physical act of frowning, the muscle-paralyzing toxin just might ease depression. A small-scale pilot trial, published in the May 15 journal Dermatologic Surgery, found that Botox injected into frown lines around the mouth or in forehead furrows of 10 women eliminated depression symptoms in nine of them and reduced symptoms in the 10th.
NEWS
By Jonathan Rosen | October 25, 2004
NEW YORK - Twenty years ago, the Jewish Theological Seminary admitted women to its rabbinical school for the first time, reversing 2,000 years of Jewish practice. The Reform movement had preceded the seminary by more than a decade. But the Conservative movement, to which the seminary belongs, views itself as working within the traditional framework of Jewish law handed down from Sinai, and so its decision was perhaps even more dramatic, prompting much soul-searching and several defections from the school by revered members of the faculty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 29, 2001
At your service: 18th-century comedy Washington's Kennedy Center begins its celebration of the arts of the United Kingdom on Tuesday with Carlo Goldoni's 18th-century comedy, "A Servant of Two Masters," co-produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company and London's Young Vic Theater Company. Goldoni's commedia dell'arte script has been adapted for this production by British playwright Lee Hall, screenwriter of "Billy Elliot." The other two theatrical components of the British festival are an adaptation of George Eliot's "The Mill on the Floss" (May 15-June 10)
NEWS
By Carl Rollyson and Carl Rollyson,Special to The Sun | June 18, 1995
"George Eliot: Voice of a Century," by Frederick R. Karl. Illustrated. 708 pages. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., $30Overdetermination, to use one of Frederick R. Karl's favorite words, is what characterizes his biography of George Eliot. Pattern, pattern everywhere and everything fits. She is a divided being, a voice of the century, because England is the same: evangelical and high church, reform-minded and reactionary. She adores authority; she abjures it.Well, his biography is not quite that schematic.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | January 22, 1995
These days, we seem to be reading more about the lives of writers than their actual works. Many of us are probably more familiar with the relationships of Ernest Hemingway, C. S. Lewis and Emily Dickinson than with their books.Phyllis Rose, in her book "Parallel Lives," about five marriages during the Victorian era -- of Thomas Carlyle, John Ruskin, John Stuart Mill, Charles Dickens and George Eliot -- notes that while we may disdain gossip as small-minded, we are at the same time fascinated by it, for it helps to tell us how to live -- and how not to live.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie | February 21, 1993
ANTHONY TROLLOPE.Victoria Glendinning.Knopf.551 pages. $30.Biographers face a formidable task, it seems. If they offer too many facts, if the level of detail extends to minutiae, the subject may appear dull and lifeless. If there are too few facts, too many breezy assumptions, the result is merely gossip and resemblance to the subject is purely cosmetic.There's another problem: Readers always know how the story comes out.So when a book comes along that portrays a main character so vividly he nearly strides off the pages, and presents the story of a life that ended in 1882 as a page-turner, the author must be doing something resoundingly right.
NEWS
March 16, 1997
"Undaunted Courage," by Stephen Ambrose, I just finished it last night. It's beautifully done. It has a phenomenal amount of detail, so it makes the exploration of Meriwether Lewis much more memorable than, say, high school history lessons. Ambrose really brings Lewis alive.I really loved George Eliot's "Adam Bede." It's a novel of England in the 19th century. Her characterization is fantastic. By the end of the book you really feel like you know them,Also "Strange Fruit," by Lillian Smith.
NEWS
February 22, 2005
IDA WOOD FITZBERGER, 86, of Buena Vista, Va., died Saturday, February 19, 2005 at her home. Mrs. Fitzberger was born on March 21, 1918 in Rocky Mount, N.C. and was a daughter of the late George Eliot Wood and Ella Halligan Ledford Wood. She attended the Christ Episcopal Church in Buena Vista and retired from Baltimore County Schools as a registered nurse. She was preceded in death by eight brothers and sisters. Mrs. Fitzberger is survived by her husband Preston Fitzberger of Buena Vista, VA., one daughter Patricia Gibson and husband Keith of Buena Vista, VA., four grandchildren and one nephew, Don Voss of Finksburg, MD. A Memorial Service will be conducted at 2 P.M. on Friday, February 25, 2005 at Christ Episcopal Church in Buena vista, VA with Rev. Tom O'Dell officiating.
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