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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | January 14, 1996
In a classic "Seinfeld" episode, Jerry is congratulating George about something he's done, saying people will remember him for it. George panics. "I don't want to be remembered," he says without hesitation. "I want to be forgotten."Too late, George.The character, played for seven seasons by Jason Alexander, has become a cult figure in our pop culture, a symbol for our time, a monument to annoying, exasperating and grossly insecure people everywhere. He also is a beacon of hope for every bald, middle-aged single guy cruising the dating highways.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 23, 2005
SO, YOU THINK you can do a better job than Jim Beattie or Mike Flanagan? Think baseball front office work isn't exactly brain surgery? Think that all those hours you spent on-line at the Orioles Hangout qualify you to put a team together? If you're like me, it could be all of the above (except for the Orioles Hangout part, of course), but the insular hierarchy of Major League Baseball has always been stacked against the little guy who isn't (a) a former athlete, (b) related to a high-ranking baseball executive or (c)
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FEATURES
By Bill Keveney and Bill Keveney,Hartford Courant | September 12, 1995
George was co-host of the Emmys.OK, it was really Jason Alexander, who plays George Costanza on "Seinfeld," but you can't convince me there wasn't a deeper message behind his selection:That maybe the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences got past the big names to see the selfless contributions of sitcom second-bananas who brave the moral nether world to make us laugh.That maybe the choice of George was an effort to make amends for the academy's past neglect of such talents as Milburn Drysdale, the greedy banker from "The Beverly Hillbillies"; Larry Tate, the obsequious ad man from "Bewitched"; and Mr. Haney, the duplicitous snake-oil salesman from "Green Acres."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 14, 2000
Men's corduroy pants that bunch up at the groin area when you sit down, people sitting at the movies who won't move their legs when you're trying to get past, friends who put you on the speaker phone when you think you're having a private conversation. These are the things that trouble the waters in the life of Larry David, creator and star of the new HBO sitcom, "Curb Your Enthusiasm." They might sound like nothing more than life's little irritations, but David is the guy who co-created the great sitcom about nothing, "Seinfeld."
NEWS
By KAREN ZAUTYK and KAREN ZAUTYK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1997
"Merrill Markoe's Guide to Love," by Merrill Markoe. Atlantic Monthly Press. 256 pages. $21.Merrill Markoe refers to certain individuals (e.g., dancer-model) as hyphenates. But she herself has been described as a writer/producer. Does that mean she's a slasher? Whatever. She is damn funny.She is also Everywoman on a psyche-threatening quest to understand - talk about challenges - love. It's the most exciting journey since Marco Polo's. And we know this one is for real. Because you can't make up stuff like this.
FEATURES
By Mike Duffy and Mike Duffy,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 21, 1993
The joy of being a joker is a rare and special calling.And for Julia Louis-Dreyfus, the lone girl in the boys' club that is NBC's slyly wacko "Seinfeld" ensemble, the goofy life has always been the good life."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 14, 2000
Men's corduroy pants that bunch up at the groin area when you sit down, people sitting at the movies who won't move their legs when you're trying to get past, friends who put you on the speaker phone when you think you're having a private conversation. These are the things that trouble the waters in the life of Larry David, creator and star of the new HBO sitcom, "Curb Your Enthusiasm." They might sound like nothing more than life's little irritations, but David is the guy who co-created the great sitcom about nothing, "Seinfeld."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 23, 2005
SO, YOU THINK you can do a better job than Jim Beattie or Mike Flanagan? Think baseball front office work isn't exactly brain surgery? Think that all those hours you spent on-line at the Orioles Hangout qualify you to put a team together? If you're like me, it could be all of the above (except for the Orioles Hangout part, of course), but the insular hierarchy of Major League Baseball has always been stacked against the little guy who isn't (a) a former athlete, (b) related to a high-ranking baseball executive or (c)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1997
"Seinfeld," the most popular television comedy of the 1990s and the centerpiece of the most profitable night in television history, will stop production at the end of this season, Jerry Seinfeld, the show's creator and star, said yesterday.The loss of "Seinfeld," which made the country laugh at the soup Nazi, close-talkers, chip double-dippers and loaves of marble rye is a serious blow to NBC, which has already seen its prime-time strength begin to weaken this season.The show has anchored NBC's big Thursday night since 1993, leading the network to its No. 1 position and to record-making profits, approaching $1 billion this year.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2000
With the Ravens now officially in the "Festivus," the well-dressed Baltimore fan may want to pick up a stylish new Festivus T-shirt to go along with the requisite giant foam-finger, purple hard hat and full camo gear. The brainchild of offensive lineman Edwin Mulitalo, the black T-shirts with purple lettering say "Happy Festivus Baltimore Style" and, once printed up this week, will sell for $19.95. Festivus, you may recall, was the word the Ravens came up with as a substitute for "playoffs" a couple of weeks ago, after coach Brian Billick banned the P-word from being uttered by the entire organization.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1997
"Seinfeld," the most popular television comedy of the 1990s and the centerpiece of the most profitable night in television history, will stop production at the end of this season, Jerry Seinfeld, the show's creator and star, said yesterday.The loss of "Seinfeld," which made the country laugh at the soup Nazi, close-talkers, chip double-dippers and loaves of marble rye is a serious blow to NBC, which has already seen its prime-time strength begin to weaken this season.The show has anchored NBC's big Thursday night since 1993, leading the network to its No. 1 position and to record-making profits, approaching $1 billion this year.
NEWS
By KAREN ZAUTYK and KAREN ZAUTYK,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 1997
"Merrill Markoe's Guide to Love," by Merrill Markoe. Atlantic Monthly Press. 256 pages. $21.Merrill Markoe refers to certain individuals (e.g., dancer-model) as hyphenates. But she herself has been described as a writer/producer. Does that mean she's a slasher? Whatever. She is damn funny.She is also Everywoman on a psyche-threatening quest to understand - talk about challenges - love. It's the most exciting journey since Marco Polo's. And we know this one is for real. Because you can't make up stuff like this.
NEWS
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | January 14, 1996
In a classic "Seinfeld" episode, Jerry is congratulating George about something he's done, saying people will remember him for it. George panics. "I don't want to be remembered," he says without hesitation. "I want to be forgotten."Too late, George.The character, played for seven seasons by Jason Alexander, has become a cult figure in our pop culture, a symbol for our time, a monument to annoying, exasperating and grossly insecure people everywhere. He also is a beacon of hope for every bald, middle-aged single guy cruising the dating highways.
FEATURES
By Bill Keveney and Bill Keveney,Hartford Courant | September 12, 1995
George was co-host of the Emmys.OK, it was really Jason Alexander, who plays George Costanza on "Seinfeld," but you can't convince me there wasn't a deeper message behind his selection:That maybe the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences got past the big names to see the selfless contributions of sitcom second-bananas who brave the moral nether world to make us laugh.That maybe the choice of George was an effort to make amends for the academy's past neglect of such talents as Milburn Drysdale, the greedy banker from "The Beverly Hillbillies"; Larry Tate, the obsequious ad man from "Bewitched"; and Mr. Haney, the duplicitous snake-oil salesman from "Green Acres."
FEATURES
By Mike Duffy and Mike Duffy,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 21, 1993
The joy of being a joker is a rare and special calling.And for Julia Louis-Dreyfus, the lone girl in the boys' club that is NBC's slyly wacko "Seinfeld" ensemble, the goofy life has always been the good life."
SPORTS
By ROCH KUBATKO | February 1, 2006
I've had requests to pick the final score of the Super Bowl. Didn't I already do that once? The Rose Bowl, I believe. And you want me to try doing it again? You're going to kill the goose that laid the golden egg. Remember George Costanza's advice: Always leave on a high note. I had Texas 48, USC 38. The nation still is abuzz over it. Now I risk ruining my reputation. OK, who am I kidding? I'll throw a score out there later this week. I promise. I was checking out the minor league transactions in a couple issues of Baseball America to see if I recognized any former Orioles farmhands.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2001
Damn Yankees. What more can be said - except for stating that they obviously have a pact with the devil? No other rational explanation exists for this baseball madness. While we were sleeping again, the New York Yankees came back Thursday to skin and gut the Arizona Diamondbacks. Same plot, different leading man: Ninth inning and two outs, the two-run homer and then, later into that good night, a 3-2 lead in the series going back to some place called Phoenix. Yankee Scott Brosius hit the home run this time - but it might as well have been Regis or George Costanza.
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