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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
You may have passed the painting hundreds of times. It hangs above the check-out counter in the main hall of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's central branch. Never gave it a second thought. Just some old white guy in a frilly collar staring across the centuries. Probably was important in some way or another. But Washington portrait artist Annette Polan knows the man well. For her, George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore and proprietary founder of the colony of Maryland, is a living, breathing connection between old England - North Yorkshire County in the 17th century to be precise - and Maryland today.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
J. George Kropp, an educator whose career at Calvert Hall College High School teaching social studies and history spanned more than 50 years, died Sunday of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Loch Raven Village resident was 76. "I call him a legend and an icon. If you knew him, he was always student-centered. He always put the kids first," said Chuck Stembler, principal of Calvert Hall. "He also had a genuine love of his subject and all things history, and he loved the intellectual rigors of history.
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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | November 2, 1991
Calvert brand whiskey, first concocted in Baltimore in 1939, never had anything to do with the noble British family of the same name that founded Maryland.And soon it won't have much to do with Maryland either.Joseph E. Seagram & Son's decision to sell some of its lower-priced liquor lines will probably result in layoffs at the distillery in Relay, the plant's manager, Frank Noppert, said yesterday.But the 460 jobs at the plant, near U.S. 1 and Interstate 95 in southern Baltimore County, will be safe for a while, he said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
It's been 75 years since Marylanders last got a look at the 17th-century document in which King James I declared George Calvert the first Lord Baltimore. But they'll get another chance Saturday as the continuing celebration of the state's 375th birthday reaches Historic St. Mary's City. Visitors to the state's archaeological museum village, on the site of the colony's first capital, will also enjoy tall ships, music, a "1634 ale" specially brewed for the occasion, food and entertainment.
NEWS
By EDWARD C. PAPENFUSE | March 25, 1993
Annapolis -- On this page March 11, Delegates Tim Malone and Sheila Hixson provided a clear and compelling argument that ''Fatti Maschii Parole Femine'' is not the state motto, but it belongs to George Calvert. It should be retained with any representation of the 1648 Great Seal of Maryland. To remove it would be to tamper with an important link to Maryland's colonial achievements, not the least of which were the Calvert efforts to provide a context for religious freedom far in advance of what England had to offer.
NEWS
By Joseph Gallagher | November 30, 1990
BARRY LEVINSON'S latest movie, ''Avalon,'' stirs memories of the rich historical meaning of its title, ignored by the film. George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, established his original colony, Avalon (1623), in easternmost Canada on the island of Newfoundland. The weather proved too severe, so the colony was abandoned. The name survives there in the Avalon Peninsula, off of whose coast Roosevelt and Churchill signed the Atlantic Charter in 1941.Calvert asked England's King Charles I for a more temperate grant, and the result was a New Avalon -- Maryland (1634)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
It's been 75 years since Marylanders last got a look at the 17th-century document in which King James I declared George Calvert the first Lord Baltimore. But they'll get another chance Saturday as the continuing celebration of the state's 375th birthday reaches Historic St. Mary's City. Visitors to the state's archaeological museum village, on the site of the colony's first capital, will also enjoy tall ships, music, a "1634 ale" specially brewed for the occasion, food and entertainment.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 26, 1992
They're back. From George Calvert, with his Vandyck beard and ruffled collar, and Cecil, with his intelligent gaze, to haughty-looking Charles and literary-minded Frederick, the life-size portraits of the six Lords Baltimore once again look down from the walls of the central hall of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's main building on Cathedral Street.The Calverts, proprietors of Maryland from 1632 to just before the Revolution, have not been seen as a group in Baltimore since before 1985, when they were sent to Annapolis for the 350th anniversary of the founding of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | October 12, 1990
MARYLAND: First Catholic Colony," an exhibition of more than 100 objects reflecting the early history of Roman Catholicism in Maryland, opens tomorrow and runs through Jan. 27 at the Maryland Historical Society, 201 W. Monument St.The exhibition, presented by the Archdiocese of Baltimore, is one of the concluding events in the year-long commemoration of the bicentennial of Baltimore's establishment as the first Catholic diocese in the United States....
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 26, 1992
They're back. From George Calvert, with his Vandyck beard and ruffled collar, and Cecil, with his intelligent gaze, to haughty-looking Charles and literary-minded Frederick, the life-size portraits of the six Lords Baltimore once again look down from the walls of the central hall of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's main building on Cathedral Street.The Calverts, proprietors of Maryland from 1632 to just before the Revolution, have not been seen as a group in Baltimore since before 1985, when they were sent to Annapolis for the 350th anniversary of the founding of Maryland.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | February 20, 2006
In the atrium of Baltimore's main library, the first Lord Baltimore - George Calvert - and his five successors stare down at patrons from full-length oil paintings, dimly lit and hung high above eye level. They've been there since 1940, when Baltimore surgeon Hugh Hampton Young donated five portraits to the Enoch Pratt Free Library, which acquired the sixth. But a tug of war is in the making over display of the historic paintings. State Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller is eyeing them for a spot in the State House in Annapolis, near a portrait of George Washington and other Colonial and early Republic art. Library and city officials are loath to part with what they see as a Baltimore cultural treasure.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 13, 2001
RICHMOND, Yorkshire, England - Four centuries after building an English country house that has been called Maryland's birthplace, George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, returned home yesterday. And, some say, he looked a little more American. A reproduction of a portrait of the proprietary founder of Maryland was unveiled in a ceremony to reopen Kiplin Hall, built by Calvert between 1622 and 1625 and partially restored in a $2 million face lift. The original portrait by Dutch artist Daniel Mytens hangs at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's central library in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
You may have passed the painting hundreds of times. It hangs above the check-out counter in the main hall of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's central branch. Never gave it a second thought. Just some old white guy in a frilly collar staring across the centuries. Probably was important in some way or another. But Washington portrait artist Annette Polan knows the man well. For her, George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore and proprietary founder of the colony of Maryland, is a living, breathing connection between old England - North Yorkshire County in the 17th century to be precise - and Maryland today.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
Of course, every school kid in Maryland knows who Queen Henrietta Maria is. Governor Glendening has even provided them with a Maryland Day Website. It's the adults who don't have a clue.Grown-ups blink, look blank and just say no when asked if they remember who Henrietta Maria is.No, Queen Henrietta Maria does not tell fortunes on Lower Broadway. No, she was not an actor in an old John Waters movie. No, she was not one of the Koester bread babes. No, she did not win the 1957 Preakness.Hint: We celebrate Maryland Day to mark the landing on March 25, 1634, of the Ark and the Dove and 200 colonists at St. Clements Island off St. Mary's County.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The crypt beneath Chapel Field in St. Mary's City has a name again -- Calvert. And one of its dead has a face.Scientists and historians concluded unanimously yesterday that the adult remains found in the coffins unearthed in Maryland's vanished Colonial capital are those of Philip Calvert, the colony's first chancellor who died in 1682, and his first wife, Ann Wolsey Calvert, who died about 1680.The infant girl found buried beside the couple in November 1992 remains unidentified.
NEWS
By EDWARD C. PAPENFUSE | March 25, 1993
Annapolis -- On this page March 11, Delegates Tim Malone and Sheila Hixson provided a clear and compelling argument that ''Fatti Maschii Parole Femine'' is not the state motto, but it belongs to George Calvert. It should be retained with any representation of the 1648 Great Seal of Maryland. To remove it would be to tamper with an important link to Maryland's colonial achievements, not the least of which were the Calvert efforts to provide a context for religious freedom far in advance of what England had to offer.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 13, 2001
RICHMOND, Yorkshire, England - Four centuries after building an English country house that has been called Maryland's birthplace, George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, returned home yesterday. And, some say, he looked a little more American. A reproduction of a portrait of the proprietary founder of Maryland was unveiled in a ceremony to reopen Kiplin Hall, built by Calvert between 1622 and 1625 and partially restored in a $2 million face lift. The original portrait by Dutch artist Daniel Mytens hangs at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's central library in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The crypt beneath Chapel Field in St. Mary's City has a name again -- Calvert. And one of its dead has a face.Scientists and historians concluded unanimously yesterday that the adult remains found in the coffins unearthed in Maryland's vanished Colonial capital are those of Philip Calvert, the colony's first chancellor who died in 1682, and his first wife, Ann Wolsey Calvert, who died about 1680.The infant girl found buried beside the couple in November 1992 remains unidentified.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 26, 1992
They're back. From George Calvert, with his Vandyck beard and ruffled collar, and Cecil, with his intelligent gaze, to haughty-looking Charles and literary-minded Frederick, the life-size portraits of the six Lords Baltimore once again look down from the walls of the central hall of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's main building on Cathedral Street.The Calverts, proprietors of Maryland from 1632 to just before the Revolution, have not been seen as a group in Baltimore since before 1985, when they were sent to Annapolis for the 350th anniversary of the founding of Maryland.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | May 26, 1992
They're back. From George Calvert, with his Vandyck beard and ruffled collar, and Cecil, with his intelligent gaze, to haughty-looking Charles and literary-minded Frederick, the life-size portraits of the six Lords Baltimore once again look down from the walls of the central hall of the Enoch Pratt Free Library's main building on Cathedral Street.The Calverts, proprietors of Maryland from 1632 to just before the Revolution, have not been seen as a group in Baltimore since before 1985, when they were sent to Annapolis for the 350th anniversary of the founding of Maryland.
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