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By Scott Duncan and Scott Duncan,Evening Sun Staff | September 17, 1990
LIFESONGS 1990" was an affirmation of life, a re-dedication to the fight against AIDS and a celebration of the victory of style over adversity.And really, who has more style on this planet than George Burns and Eartha Kitt?Both charmed a sold-out audience at Meyerhoff Hall last night, which was decked out for the third-annual "Lifesongs" benefit for the Health Education Resource Organization, or HERO.Burns, 94, puffed on a cigar, rasped through his standard tunes, and delivered a stand-up (and part sit-down)
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NEWS
November 17, 2007
RONNIE BURNS, 72 Son of Burns and Allen Ronnie Burns, the son of George Burns and Gracie Allen who played himself on his parents' TV show in the 1950s, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Pacific Palisades, Calif., according to his wife, Janice. Born in Evanston, Ill., he was adopted when he was 3 months old. He grew up among the elite of Hollywood and the privileged of Beverly Hills, but preferred a low-key life, according to friends and family. Mr. Burns appeared as himself for several seasons on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, which aired from 1950 to 1958, and later on The George Burns Show.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1996
Happy 100th, Mr. Burns.* "NHL All-Star Game" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- The best players of the National Hockey League square off against one another in the 44th annual contest, live from Boston's new FleetCenter. Should be an offensive feast the last seven all-star games have averaged 15 goals each. There should be enough flying hockey pucks here to keep even Don Rickles happy. Fox.* Figure Skating (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Michelle Kwan takes on reigning champion Nicole Bobek in the women's finals of the U.S. Figure Skating Championships.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 25, 2005
In the one-man show Say Goodnight Gracie, when actor Frank Gorshin - in the guise of George Burns - talks about breaking into vaudeville at age 14, a slide of an audience in a vaudeville palace appears on a screen behind him. At the Hippodrome Theatre, Gorshin happens to be facing a live audience in a former vaudeville palace. The verisimilitude continues when he describes various vaudeville acts, from comics to singers to animal acts, many of which probably appeared on this very stage.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 11, 1996
Playing the title role in "Oh, God!" in 1977, George Burns confirmed what Earl Weaver and every Oriole fan on Earth already knew: "My last miracle was the '69 Mets." . . . G.B. was beloved for his humor -- my brother called just two weeks ago, in stitches over a "Burns & Allen" video -- but I always liked the little big man's doses of grandpa wisdom. "Listen, kid," he once said. "If you can fall in love with what you're going to do for a living, you got it made."Rejecting bullets, not buttsThe 1995-96 Washington Bullets yearbook features a look back at Baltimore days and the likes of Gus Johnson and Wes Unseld.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | September 12, 1990
By 11 a.m., George Burns is sitting in his Hollywood office schmoozing on the phone and finishing off cigar No. 3.He's just nixed an offer to work with Bob Hope in Australia for five weeks. "Too tough," he explains. "I'm 94. I faint twice a day, sometimes three times a day."A long pause, then the gravelly, smoke-filled voice breaks into laughter. Although he lacks a stage and a large audience, the elder statesman of comedy can't help but turn a phone conversation into a jokefest.On being interviewed: "It's very nice to be 94 years old and get out of bed to be interviewed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 20, 2005
Over the course of a five-decade career, actor, impressionist and stand-up comic Frank Gorshin has impersonated just about everyone but God. Until now. OK. He's not playing God. He's playing someone who played God. In the one-man show Say Goodnight Gracie, which opens a two-week run at the Hippodrome Theatre on Tuesday, Gorshin portrays George Burns, the actor who had the title role in the 1977 movie Oh, God! and its two sequels. Although Burns, who died at the age of 100 in 1996, portrayed the Almighty, he spent the core of his career playing straight man to his wife, Gracie Allen, first in vaudeville, then in their long-running radio show and subsequently on TV. Gorshin, 70, spoke about Burns' career - and his own - earlier this week from Farmington, N.M., where he was performing Say Goodnight Gracie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1996: George Burns dies at 100 1996: Rappers Tupac, Biggie slain 1999: "Homicide" canceled 1999: Pokemon catches fire
NEWS
November 17, 2007
RONNIE BURNS, 72 Son of Burns and Allen Ronnie Burns, the son of George Burns and Gracie Allen who played himself on his parents' TV show in the 1950s, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Pacific Palisades, Calif., according to his wife, Janice. Born in Evanston, Ill., he was adopted when he was 3 months old. He grew up among the elite of Hollywood and the privileged of Beverly Hills, but preferred a low-key life, according to friends and family. Mr. Burns appeared as himself for several seasons on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, which aired from 1950 to 1958, and later on The George Burns Show.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2001
The Christmas season invokes more than its share of nostalgia, and if anyone can raise a walk down Memory Lane to the level of high art, it's John Tegler. The gravelly voiced Severna Park resident is truly a Renaissance man. He is the host of a syndicated radio talk show and a jazz aficionado who produces festivals and cruises devoted to his beloved musical art form. And he's a lover of the big bands and the Golden Age of Radio whose polished and loving evocations of classic radio broadcasts from the 1930s and '40s have won him a large and enthusiastic following.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 20, 2005
Over the course of a five-decade career, actor, impressionist and stand-up comic Frank Gorshin has impersonated just about everyone but God. Until now. OK. He's not playing God. He's playing someone who played God. In the one-man show Say Goodnight Gracie, which opens a two-week run at the Hippodrome Theatre on Tuesday, Gorshin portrays George Burns, the actor who had the title role in the 1977 movie Oh, God! and its two sequels. Although Burns, who died at the age of 100 in 1996, portrayed the Almighty, he spent the core of his career playing straight man to his wife, Gracie Allen, first in vaudeville, then in their long-running radio show and subsequently on TV. Gorshin, 70, spoke about Burns' career - and his own - earlier this week from Farmington, N.M., where he was performing Say Goodnight Gracie.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2001
The Christmas season invokes more than its share of nostalgia, and if anyone can raise a walk down Memory Lane to the level of high art, it's John Tegler. The gravelly voiced Severna Park resident is truly a Renaissance man. He is the host of a syndicated radio talk show and a jazz aficionado who produces festivals and cruises devoted to his beloved musical art form. And he's a lover of the big bands and the Golden Age of Radio whose polished and loving evocations of classic radio broadcasts from the 1930s and '40s have won him a large and enthusiastic following.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1999
1996: George Burns dies at 100 1996: Rappers Tupac, Biggie slain 1999: "Homicide" canceled 1999: Pokemon catches fire
NEWS
By Doug Nye and Doug Nye,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 1996
During the 1930s and 1940s, there weren't many Americans who didn't welcome George Burns and Gracie Allen into their homes each week. Their weekly radio show was a consistent hit and made them one of the most beloved husband-and-wife comedy teams of all time.In 1950, Burns and Allen made the transition to television, bringing with them their old fans while cultivating a new generation of followers. The TV show had a successful run of eight years. It probably would have lasted longer had not Gracie decided it was time for her to retire.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 11, 1996
Playing the title role in "Oh, God!" in 1977, George Burns confirmed what Earl Weaver and every Oriole fan on Earth already knew: "My last miracle was the '69 Mets." . . . G.B. was beloved for his humor -- my brother called just two weeks ago, in stitches over a "Burns & Allen" video -- but I always liked the little big man's doses of grandpa wisdom. "Listen, kid," he once said. "If you can fall in love with what you're going to do for a living, you got it made."Rejecting bullets, not buttsThe 1995-96 Washington Bullets yearbook features a look back at Baltimore days and the likes of Gus Johnson and Wes Unseld.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 1996
George Burns, the beloved cigar-puffing comedian whose career spanned vaudeville, radio, movies and television, died yesterday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif.Mr. Burns, 100, was the foremost comic "straight man" of his time in a partnership with his late wife, the scatterbrained Gracie Allen. He began a new solo career in show business when he was nearly 80.When he was well into his 90s, Mr. Burns announced with his customary brio that he had arranged to celebrate his 100th birthday, on Jan. 20, 1996, with an engagement at the London Palladium.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | January 31, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:TO THE MOON! -- Mark Linn-Baker and Bronson Pinchot of ABC's "Perfect Strangers" are the best slapstick comedy duo on current series television. And on Friday's episode (at 9 p.m., Channel 13), they fondly adopt the guise of one of early TV's funniest pairs, Jackie Gleason and Art Carney of "The Honeymooners." Note there is nothing wrong with your set; the episode was shot in black and white.STILL COUNTING -- Speaking of early TV, George Burns was hardly a young man when he began playing in "The Burns and Allen Show," back in 1950.
NEWS
By Doug Nye and Doug Nye,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 1996
During the 1930s and 1940s, there weren't many Americans who didn't welcome George Burns and Gracie Allen into their homes each week. Their weekly radio show was a consistent hit and made them one of the most beloved husband-and-wife comedy teams of all time.In 1950, Burns and Allen made the transition to television, bringing with them their old fans while cultivating a new generation of followers. The TV show had a successful run of eight years. It probably would have lasted longer had not Gracie decided it was time for her to retire.
NEWS
By Theo Lippman and Theo Lippman,Special to the sun | January 21, 1996
America is about to lose one of the last survivors of a great national literature, un-mannered, un-recognized as such, and, so far, un-replaced. "Literature" may be the wrong word, but the great radio comedians were an important part of American cultural history. George Burns is the man.Early last year, as he anticipated his 100th birthday on Jan. 20, 1996, he dismissed concerns for his mortality with, "I can't die - I'm booked." It was an appropriate way to look at it for a man who had been in show business since he was 8-years-old.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 20, 1996
Happy 100th, Mr. Burns.* "NHL All-Star Game" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- The best players of the National Hockey League square off against one another in the 44th annual contest, live from Boston's new FleetCenter. Should be an offensive feast the last seven all-star games have averaged 15 goals each. There should be enough flying hockey pucks here to keep even Don Rickles happy. Fox.* Figure Skating (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Michelle Kwan takes on reigning champion Nicole Bobek in the women's finals of the U.S. Figure Skating Championships.
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