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SPORTS
August 30, 1993
The Kansas City Royals' George Brett yesterday stole his 200th base, putting him into an exclusive club of players with 200 steals, 3,000 hits and 300 home runs:Player.. .. .. ..SB .. .. ..Hits .. .. .. ..HRHank Aaron .. ..240 .. .. .3,771 .. .. .. .755George Brett ...200 .. .. .3,123 .. .. .. .312Willie Mays .. .338 .. .. .3,283 .. .. .. .660
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Cal Ripken Jr. remembers well the pleasures of playing in Kansas City the last time the Royals were contenders - the smart, respectful fans who adored their team but would also applaud an opponent's standout catch. "Playing in Kansas City was a lot like playing in Baltimore," the Orioles great said Thursday as his former club prepared to play the Royals in the American League Championship Series. It's hard to imagine two franchises or two fan bases better equipped to understand one another's journeys.
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SPORTS
June 11, 1995
Steve Garvey injures his thumb on July 29, ending his consecutive-games streak at a National League- record 1,207.* George Brett has a home run taken away for having pine tar on his bat more than 18 inches from the knob on July 24 against the New York Yankees.* LaMarr Hoyt goes 13-0 the second half to win the American League Cy Young Award.* Gaylord Perry, Carl Yastrzemski and Johnny Bench all retire.* The Brooklyn Bridge turns 100.* Chicago and Philadelphia elect African-American mayors.
SPORTS
By Sam Mellinger and The Kansas City Star | October 9, 2014
Those are the Royals over there in front of all the cameras. That's Eric Hosmer on the cover of Sports Illustrated. That's him and his teammates making the funnest kind of off-the-field news by dropping around $15,000 on a bar tab to say thank you to fans. That's James Shields starting for the third time in five playoff games for a franchise writing a brilliant, welcome and enthralling new history. And that's George Brett, off to the side - always off to the side now - thankful for it all and saying something that may surprise you. “I'm tired of talking about 1985, I really am,” he says.
SPORTS
By Connor Letourneau and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
It may be a good thing the Orioles only face Billy Butler a handful of games each season. The Kansas City Royals designated hitter has been an absolute monster against the O's the past five years. Entering Thursday night's series opener, Butler boasted a .329 average (.564 slugging) with seven home runs and 12 doubles. But through five innings Thursday, the All-Star seems to be outdoing himself. He had a three-run homer in the first inning, a double in the third and a triple in the fifth.
SPORTS
By Sam Mellinger and The Kansas City Star | October 9, 2014
Those are the Royals over there in front of all the cameras. That's Eric Hosmer on the cover of Sports Illustrated. That's him and his teammates making the funnest kind of off-the-field news by dropping around $15,000 on a bar tab to say thank you to fans. That's James Shields starting for the third time in five playoff games for a franchise writing a brilliant, welcome and enthralling new history. And that's George Brett, off to the side - always off to the side now - thankful for it all and saying something that may surprise you. “I'm tired of talking about 1985, I really am,” he says.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
Nolan Ryan sat at home writing holiday thank-you notes and trying to treat the day like any other. George Brett stayed inside with his wife, watching the clock and feeling like a prisoner. Robin Yount plopped down in his office, never far removed from a telephone.The calls came for all three players yesterday. And while they may not have arrived at precisely the times they expected, the wait was hardly a long one.In one of the most eagerly awaited Hall of Fame elections in baseball history, all three players were voted into the Cooperstown, N.Y., shrine in their first year of eligibility.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | October 13, 2005
It's 5:17 on Monday afternoon, and I'm desperately worried that some guy I don't know is going to draft George Brett or, more specifically, a computer simulation based on George Brett's career statistics. You see, the electronic George is supposed to be the linchpin of my team, A Brave New Beane. If you're far from knowing what I'm talking about, you're probably better off. Fantasy football's bad enough. What I'm about to peddle is the strong stuff. I speak of ESPN Classic Fantasy Baseball, though I could just as easily be talking about Stats Inc.'s Classic Game or Whatifsports.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1999
This "roar of the crowd" stuff is vastly overrated.This weekend, Major League Baseball named a 30-member All-Century team as voted on by fans and a panel of experts. After studying the results, all we can say is: Aah, what do they know?You see, The Sun asked its own distinguished group of voters -- columnist George F. Will, broadcaster Bob Costas, Hall of Fame announcer Ernie Harwell, sportswriters Dave Kindred and Christine Brennan and Sun publisher and long-time fan Michael E. Waller -- for their selections.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
CINCINNATI -- University of Kansas chancellor Gene Budig was off to a promising start yesterday as the new American League president.As he was formally introduced to the media at the owners' meetings, Budig told of his enthusiasm for the designated hitter rule and his support for baseball's realigned divisions. He even said it would be nice to speak to fans and find out what they want from a league president.This was a speech to win the hearts and minds of every AL owner."What fans think about the game is important," Budig said.
SPORTS
By Connor Letourneau and The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
It may be a good thing the Orioles only face Billy Butler a handful of games each season. The Kansas City Royals designated hitter has been an absolute monster against the O's the past five years. Entering Thursday night's series opener, Butler boasted a .329 average (.564 slugging) with seven home runs and 12 doubles. But through five innings Thursday, the All-Star seems to be outdoing himself. He had a three-run homer in the first inning, a double in the third and a triple in the fifth.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | June 11, 2008
Two rare baseball phenomena are on course to happen so far this season, but, like asteroids that come hurtling into Earth's part of the galaxy, they are unlikely to hit the mark. These two things intersect at 1060 West Addison in Chicago, where the Atlanta Braves are playing the Cubs at Wrigley Field. Chipper Jones, the Braves' superb third baseman, is hitting over .400 for the first third of the season, chasing an elusive mark last achieved by Ted Williams in 1941. And the Cubs, the most championship-famished franchise in the history of major American sports, have the best record in the major leagues, with hopes of capturing their first pennant since 1945 and even - maybe, perhaps - their first world championship since nineteen-aught-eight.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | October 13, 2005
It's 5:17 on Monday afternoon, and I'm desperately worried that some guy I don't know is going to draft George Brett or, more specifically, a computer simulation based on George Brett's career statistics. You see, the electronic George is supposed to be the linchpin of my team, A Brave New Beane. If you're far from knowing what I'm talking about, you're probably better off. Fantasy football's bad enough. What I'm about to peddle is the strong stuff. I speak of ESPN Classic Fantasy Baseball, though I could just as easily be talking about Stats Inc.'s Classic Game or Whatifsports.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1999
This "roar of the crowd" stuff is vastly overrated.This weekend, Major League Baseball named a 30-member All-Century team as voted on by fans and a panel of experts. After studying the results, all we can say is: Aah, what do they know?You see, The Sun asked its own distinguished group of voters -- columnist George F. Will, broadcaster Bob Costas, Hall of Fame announcer Ernie Harwell, sportswriters Dave Kindred and Christine Brennan and Sun publisher and long-time fan Michael E. Waller -- for their selections.
SPORTS
July 25, 1999
Seven new members of the baseball Hall of Fame are to be enshrined today:George BrettBorn: George Howard Brett on May 15, 1953, in Glen Dale, W.Va.Highlights: Clutch, big-game player. Ranks 13th on career hits list with 3,154. A 13-time All-Star third baseman. Hit .305 in 21-year career, all in Kansas City. Holds Royals records in runs (1,583), hits, doubles, triples, home runs (317) and RBIs (1,595). Hit .370 in taking Royals to only World Series title in 1985. Was ALCS MVP. Won Gold Glove, too. Won AL MVP award in 1980, batting .390 in leading K.C. to its first Series appearance.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
Nolan Ryan sat at home writing holiday thank-you notes and trying to treat the day like any other. George Brett stayed inside with his wife, watching the clock and feeling like a prisoner. Robin Yount plopped down in his office, never far removed from a telephone.The calls came for all three players yesterday. And while they may not have arrived at precisely the times they expected, the wait was hardly a long one.In one of the most eagerly awaited Hall of Fame elections in baseball history, all three players were voted into the Cooperstown, N.Y., shrine in their first year of eligibility.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Evening Sun Staff | August 12, 1991
Bill Ripken is scheduled to begin his rehabilitation assignment tonight in Frederick when he will be the Class A Keys' designated hitter against Peninsula.Ripken, who has been on the disabled list with a strained ribcage since July 15, may then dabble at second base for the Double A Hagerstown Suns tomorrow night."If he's able, that's the plan," manager John Oates said.* JOHNSON JOLTED: Dave Johnson, the Orioles' starter yesterday in the no-hit 7-0 loss to Chicago, threw 47 pitches in 1 1/3 innings and was battered for eight hits and four runs.
SPORTS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
Billy Duquette, an 8-year-old from Herndon, Va., climbed on the shoulders of Ed Geiger, a burly Marine and his newfound friend for life. Geiger then climbed on top of a plastic milk carton behind Camden Yards' right-field wall, giving young Billy a perch as precarious as the Orioles' first-place standing.With yesterday's 8-6 loss to the Kansas City Royals and the Toronto Blue Jays' 4-1 win over the Chicago White Sox last night, the Orioles' brief moment in the sun was just that. Billy, at least, got down safely.
SPORTS
June 11, 1995
Steve Garvey injures his thumb on July 29, ending his consecutive-games streak at a National League- record 1,207.* George Brett has a home run taken away for having pine tar on his bat more than 18 inches from the knob on July 24 against the New York Yankees.* LaMarr Hoyt goes 13-0 the second half to win the American League Cy Young Award.* Gaylord Perry, Carl Yastrzemski and Johnny Bench all retire.* The Brooklyn Bridge turns 100.* Chicago and Philadelphia elect African-American mayors.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
CINCINNATI -- University of Kansas chancellor Gene Budig was off to a promising start yesterday as the new American League president.As he was formally introduced to the media at the owners' meetings, Budig told of his enthusiasm for the designated hitter rule and his support for baseball's realigned divisions. He even said it would be nice to speak to fans and find out what they want from a league president.This was a speech to win the hearts and minds of every AL owner."What fans think about the game is important," Budig said.
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