Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGeorge Bell
IN THE NEWS

George Bell

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 21, 2004
On January 16, 2004 KATHLEEN E. BELL (nee Blatchley), beloved wife J. George Bell Sr.; devoted mother of George Bell Jr. and his wife Laura, Bridgette Oppenheimer and her husband Eric, Suzie Sudek and her husband Bill; dear sister of Robert and Eugene Blatchely. Also survived by nine grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home Inc., 9705 Belair Rd (Perry Hall), on Wednesday and Thursday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. with a Christian Wake Service on Wednesday at 4 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Our Lady Of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church on Friday at 11 a.m. Interment in Holly Hill Memorial Gardens.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 4, 2005
George F. Bell, a retired telephone company construction supervisor active in the Lions Club, died of a heart attack Wednesday at Howard County General Hospital. The Westview resident was 83. Born in Frederick, he was a 1940 graduate of Frederick High School. He served in the Marine Corps during World War II, and was recalled into service during the Korean War. He joined Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. in the 1940s, and at his retirement in 1984 was based in Ellicott City as a supervisor of construction.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 23, 2004
Kathleen E. Bell, a founder and former co-owner of a Baltimore office supply company, died of a heart attack Jan. 16 at her winter home in Marathon Key, Fla. She was 59. She was born Kathleen E. Blatchley in Baltimore and was raised in Govans. She graduated in 1963 from the Institute of Notre Dame and worked briefly for the Army Corps of Engineers in Baltimore. In 1964, she married Joseph George Bell, and the next year the couple established Office Services Inc., which they operated at first from the trunk of their car. They expanded the business to a small shop and eventually to a site in Canton Industrial Park.
NEWS
September 26, 2005
On September 24, 2005, ANNAPENNINGTON BELL, beloved wife of the late Billie B. Bell Sr., daughter of the late Lelia and George Pennington Sr., devoted mother of Billie Bell Jr., Gary Bell, Darlene Hicks, George Bell, Ray Bell, Margie Bell and spouses, Alice, Sandy, Donna, Miriam Bell and Charles Hicks Sr., sister of the late George Pennington Jr., loving grandmother of Brian Schoonover, Ashley Bell, Audrey and Rachael Buchanan. Also survived by loving step-grandchildren, sisters-in-laws, nieces, nephews and friends.
NEWS
September 26, 2005
On September 24, 2005, ANNAPENNINGTON BELL, beloved wife of the late Billie B. Bell Sr., daughter of the late Lelia and George Pennington Sr., devoted mother of Billie Bell Jr., Gary Bell, Darlene Hicks, George Bell, Ray Bell, Margie Bell and spouses, Alice, Sandy, Donna, Miriam Bell and Charles Hicks Sr., sister of the late George Pennington Jr., loving grandmother of Brian Schoonover, Ashley Bell, Audrey and Rachael Buchanan. Also survived by loving step-grandchildren, sisters-in-laws, nieces, nephews and friends.
SPORTS
November 4, 1990
Ex-trainer reportedly tied to crime figureFormer Denver Nuggets trainer Robert "Chopper" Travaglini is being investigated by the National Basketball Association for a possible association with an organized crime figure, the Rocky Mountain News reported yesterday.Travaglini, 58m who announced his retirement Thursday after 14 years with the Nuggets, was seen with Paul "Fat Paulie" Villano, the newspaper said.Lt. Ed Hansen, commander of the Denver Police Intelligence Section, confirmed that the two were seen at a restaurant near McNichols Sports Arena about three weeks ago. The paper said that Villano, 62, is a member of the Smaldone crime family and has an extensive gambling record.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 15, 1991
DUNEDIN, Fla. -- Rene Gonzales surveyed the raucous Toronto Blue Jays' clubhouse on a rainy spring training morning. "There's always got to be some jerks on a team," he said. "But I haven't found them yet."Suddenly he stopped."Maybe I'm it," he said.No chance. Gonzales, 29, was one of the Orioles' most popular players, both with teammates and fans. But such is the state of affairs with the new, improved Blue Jays, he can't even identify a player he dislikes.The infielder wouldn't have had that problem in the past.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 25, 1991
SAN PEDRO DE MACORIS, Dominican Republic -- The numbers are astounding. Nothing less than that.During the 1991 baseball season, 12 players from this coastal city played in at least one major-league game. That means that one of every 10,000 residents becomes a major-leaguer.If the Baltimore area produced talent at the same rate, it would have 200 natives wearing major-league uniforms right now.Two hundred. Astounding.As it is, the Baltimore area had just a half-dozen in the bigs last season, ranging from Glenelg's Greg Smith to Aberdeen's Cal Ripken.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
If there ever was a time for Bob Milacki to shake his slump, last night appeared to be it. Winless in his four previous starts, Milacki was facing a Chicago White Sox team that he had beaten in two previous starts this season.But the third meeting would be anything but a breeze for Milacki, who gave up six runs in 3 2/3 innings in an 8-4 loss that dropped the Orioles four games behind the Toronto Blue Jays in the American League East.And as Milacki (5-6) walked off the field to boos from the crowd of 45,451 -- the Orioles' 20th straight sellout -- he had to be wondering when his next start might be.That start for Milacki, who left the clubhouse early and was unavailable for comment, is scheduled for Sunday against the Minnesota Twins.
SPORTS
April 26, 1992
NEW YORK -- Chicago Cubs general manager Larry Himes is feeling a lot of heat over one move he didn't make and another he did.Himes passed on the opportunity to sign pitcher Rick Sutcliffe last winter, and this spring his infatuation with Sammy Sosa influenced him to give up George Bell.Sutcliffe's early success with the Orioles, especially in light of the Cubs' continued pitching problems, has been a source of embarrassment to Himes. He says he may have made a mistake with the veteran right-hander, but quickly explains the logic behind the decision.
NEWS
January 23, 2004
Kathleen E. Bell, a founder and former co-owner of a Baltimore office supply company, died of a heart attack Jan. 16 at her winter home in Marathon Key, Fla. She was 59. She was born Kathleen E. Blatchley in Baltimore and was raised in Govans. She graduated in 1963 from the Institute of Notre Dame and worked briefly for the Army Corps of Engineers in Baltimore. In 1964, she married Joseph George Bell, and the next year the couple established Office Services Inc., which they operated at first from the trunk of their car. They expanded the business to a small shop and eventually to a site in Canton Industrial Park.
NEWS
January 21, 2004
On January 16, 2004 KATHLEEN E. BELL (nee Blatchley), beloved wife J. George Bell Sr.; devoted mother of George Bell Jr. and his wife Laura, Bridgette Oppenheimer and her husband Eric, Suzie Sudek and her husband Bill; dear sister of Robert and Eugene Blatchely. Also survived by nine grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home Inc., 9705 Belair Rd (Perry Hall), on Wednesday and Thursday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. with a Christian Wake Service on Wednesday at 4 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Our Lady Of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church on Friday at 11 a.m. Interment in Holly Hill Memorial Gardens.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | October 9, 1993
TORONTO -- Gene Lamont had to be the most relieved person in SkyDome when Game 3 of the American League Championship Series began last night.After what the Chicago White Sox manager has had to endure the past couple of days, being down two games to the Toronto Blue Jays must have seemed like a piece of pie.For the second straight day, Lamont found it necessary to reveal his unhappiness with a disgruntled ballplayer. This time it was George Bell, who may have talked his way out of Chicago even faster than anticipated.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
If there ever was a time for Bob Milacki to shake his slump, last night appeared to be it. Winless in his four previous starts, Milacki was facing a Chicago White Sox team that he had beaten in two previous starts this season.But the third meeting would be anything but a breeze for Milacki, who gave up six runs in 3 2/3 innings in an 8-4 loss that dropped the Orioles four games behind the Toronto Blue Jays in the American League East.And as Milacki (5-6) walked off the field to boos from the crowd of 45,451 -- the Orioles' 20th straight sellout -- he had to be wondering when his next start might be.That start for Milacki, who left the clubhouse early and was unavailable for comment, is scheduled for Sunday against the Minnesota Twins.
SPORTS
April 26, 1992
NEW YORK -- Chicago Cubs general manager Larry Himes is feeling a lot of heat over one move he didn't make and another he did.Himes passed on the opportunity to sign pitcher Rick Sutcliffe last winter, and this spring his infatuation with Sammy Sosa influenced him to give up George Bell.Sutcliffe's early success with the Orioles, especially in light of the Cubs' continued pitching problems, has been a source of embarrassment to Himes. He says he may have made a mistake with the veteran right-hander, but quickly explains the logic behind the decision.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | December 25, 1991
SAN PEDRO DE MACORIS, Dominican Republic -- The numbers are astounding. Nothing less than that.During the 1991 baseball season, 12 players from this coastal city played in at least one major-league game. That means that one of every 10,000 residents becomes a major-leaguer.If the Baltimore area produced talent at the same rate, it would have 200 natives wearing major-league uniforms right now.Two hundred. Astounding.As it is, the Baltimore area had just a half-dozen in the bigs last season, ranging from Glenelg's Greg Smith to Aberdeen's Cal Ripken.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1990
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Mickey Tettleton's agent said yesterday that the free-agent catcher will strongly consider accepting the Orioles' offer of salary arbitration, pending the outcome of contract talks with one other club.The chances of Tettleton returning to Baltimore are now better than ever. By accepting the Orioles' offer, he would be agreeing to a one-year contract. His salary would be determined later, through further negotiations or an arbitrator's ruling."There's one more thing that has to fall in order for the deal we're looking for to be made," said Tettleton's agent, Tony Attanasio.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | November 30, 1990
Everything seems to be falling into place for the Bottom-line Orioles, who may well be looking at a perfect off-season.Apparently, a few teams finally are showing interest in Mickey Tettleton, meaning he could be signed before Dec. 9. You know which way the Bottom-lines are rooting. Here's the worst-case scenario: On Dec. 9, the Orioles and Tettleton, who has no other offers, agree to go to arbitration, and the Orioles are stuck with him for something more than $1 million. Yes, they did offer him a one-year contract earlier, but that was because they knew he'd refuse it. So, now, what if he has a good season?
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 15, 1991
DUNEDIN, Fla. -- Rene Gonzales surveyed the raucous Toronto Blue Jays' clubhouse on a rainy spring training morning. "There's always got to be some jerks on a team," he said. "But I haven't found them yet."Suddenly he stopped."Maybe I'm it," he said.No chance. Gonzales, 29, was one of the Orioles' most popular players, both with teammates and fans. But such is the state of affairs with the new, improved Blue Jays, he can't even identify a player he dislikes.The infielder wouldn't have had that problem in the past.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1990
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Mickey Tettleton's agent said yesterday that the free-agent catcher will strongly consider accepting the Orioles' offer of salary arbitration, pending the outcome of contract talks with one other club.The chances of Tettleton returning to Baltimore are now better than ever. By accepting the Orioles' offer, he would be agreeing to a one-year contract. His salary would be determined later, through further negotiations or an arbitrator's ruling."There's one more thing that has to fall in order for the deal we're looking for to be made," said Tettleton's agent, Tony Attanasio.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.