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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1997
As ballet lore has it, George Balanchine clapped his hands for attention at the end of class one day in 1934. "Mmmm," he said to his students. "I think we'll start something."That "something" was the ballet called "Serenade." As the title suggests, it's a nocturne, a song to the night, hushed and ephemeral as moonlight. It is also a masterpiece."Serenade" was the first ballet the Russian-born Balanchine made in America and also the first major abstract ballet in dance history. Intended as a teaching piece, it is today in the repertory of every major ballet company in the world.
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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
The dance students glide - and sometimes stumble noisily - across the gray wood floor. Their hair is pinned back in tight little buns, their toes are crammed into pointe shoes. The choreography has brought them center stage, staggered in four lines, with two girls lying on the floor in the middle. Judith Fugate stops the rehearsal. Something is wrong. It is day six, hour four of rehearsals for George Balanchine's ballet Serenade. The dancers - students at the Baltimore School for the Arts - are exhausted.
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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2004
The dance students glide - and sometimes stumble noisily - across the gray wood floor. Their hair is pinned back in tight little buns, their toes are crammed into pointe shoes. The choreography has brought them center stage, staggered in four lines, with two girls lying on the floor in the middle. Judith Fugate stops the rehearsal. Something is wrong. It is day six, hour four of rehearsals for George Balanchine's ballet Serenade. The dancers - students at the Baltimore School for the Arts - are exhausted.
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By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2000
Ballet Theatre of Maryland's 20th Anniversary Gala at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts proved that this company has come of age with its dancing feet planted squarely in the future. As well as spotlighting the creativity and choreography skills of Artistic Director Edward Stewart, who has led Ballet Theatre since 1980, the program revealed the strength and depth of the company, and the skills of its principal dancers, soloists and guest artists. For "Soirees Musicales," the entire company assembled on stage for a lively "March" opening.
NEWS
November 25, 1994
Erick Hawkins, 85, a choreographer who danced with George Balanchine and Martha Graham and later founded his own dance company, died in New York on Wednesday of cancer. Mr. Hawkins was the first American student at George Balanchine's School of American Ballet. Mr. Hawkins and Ms. Graham married in 1948, then divorced in 1954. President Clinton awarded Mr. Hawkins the National Medal of Arts last month.David Berg, 75, leader of The Children of God, a controversial Christian sect involved in legal conflicts across the world, is dead, his followers said in London yesterday.
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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 1996
Principal dancer Susan Farrell was one of a select group of women whom choreographer George Balanchine considered his muses and for whom he created ballets.Farrell is now a part of the George Balanchine Trust, which oversees the production of his dances worldwide. Most recently, she's been working with the Washington Ballet on staging Mozart's "Divertimento No. 15."Tuesday night there was an open rehearsal and performance at the Kennedy Center Terrace Theatre. While eight hand-picked dancers performed only two of the ballet's five sections, Farrell called the two movements, "Theme and Variations" and "Andante," the "heart of the ballet."
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By J. L. Conklin DTC and J. L. Conklin DTC,Contributing Writer | March 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The program that Dance Theatre of Harlem selected to open its two-week run last night at the Kennedy Center did not feature a world premiere, but the program did offer ballet excitement as only this company can deliver.Opening the evening was "The Four Temperaments" to music by Paul Hindemith. This beautiful and difficult abstract ballet by George Balanchine usually closes the program of lesser ballet companies, but DTH announced its D.C. arrival with a finely tuned and vigorous performance.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | May 9, 1991
When Loyola College invited the Maryland Ballet to take up residency at McManus Theater, it was like "manna from heaven," says artistic director Phillip Carman.This past winter and spring, the company, suffering financial shortfalls made worse by the recession and the Persian Gulf war, canceled two weekends of performances at the Baltimore Museum of Art.The Loyola offer allows the ballet to close its fifth anniversary season with performances tomorrow through Sunday, featuring "Tarantella" -- a pas de deux by George Balanchine -- and two world premieres by Carman.
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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | March 24, 1994
"Breakers," a new work that premiered Tuesday night as the Boston Ballet opened a six-day stint at the Kennedy Center Opera House in Washington, is vintage Merce Cunningham.In "Breakers," the legendary choreographer has created a dance that is as opaque and muted as the set of coral, gold, orange and chartreuse rectangles artfully suspended behind the 14 dancers.The work, performed to an original score by John Driscoll, began simply enough. The company formed a circle at one end of the stage, with a single dancer in contrast at the other.
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By Joan Jacobson | March 2, 1992
PRODIGAL SON: DANCING FOR BALANCHINE IN A WORLD OF PAIN AND MAGIC. By Edward Villella with Larry Kaplan. Simon & Schuster. 306 pages. $23.IT ISN'T surprising that Edward Villella's autobiography begins with this pronouncement: "By my count, this is at least the fifth book written by a New York City ballet dancer about George Balanchine."About George Balanchine.Not about Edward Villella, the brilliant dancer whose American athleticism left its imprint on 20th century ballet; whose appearances on the the Bell Telephone Hour and the Ed Sullivan Show demonstrated to a nation that men could be manly ballet dancers.
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By Kristy Montee and Kristy Montee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2000
No one is really sure what George Balanchine meant when he echoed King Louis XV's famous quote, "Apres moi, le deluge." The choreographer of the world's most precise and eloquent ballets was notoriously - even gleefully - obtuse when it came to talking about his art. The naysayers who feared a decline for the New York City Ballet under Balanchine's successor, Peter Martins, saw it as an apocalyptic prediction. Even the most optimistic saw it as a simple statement of fact. After Balanchine's death in 1983, how could ballet ever be the same?
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 19, 1997
As ballet lore has it, George Balanchine clapped his hands for attention at the end of class one day in 1934. "Mmmm," he said to his students. "I think we'll start something."That "something" was the ballet called "Serenade." As the title suggests, it's a nocturne, a song to the night, hushed and ephemeral as moonlight. It is also a masterpiece."Serenade" was the first ballet the Russian-born Balanchine made in America and also the first major abstract ballet in dance history. Intended as a teaching piece, it is today in the repertory of every major ballet company in the world.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 25, 1997
Go figure: Ballet is at the same time one of the most popular high-culture art forms in America, and one of the most intimidating. Countless pleasure-loving people who go to museums or the opera without a second thought freeze up when it comes to tutu-and-leotard shows. What's the problem - or, as my New York friends say, what's not to like? The answer, so far as I can tell, is twofold: (1) Jargon. (2) "Swan Lake."Ballet talk is the worst jargon in the world, partly because it's mostly in French and partly because far too many balletomanes (that's ballet talk for dance buffs)
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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 1996
Principal dancer Susan Farrell was one of a select group of women whom choreographer George Balanchine considered his muses and for whom he created ballets.Farrell is now a part of the George Balanchine Trust, which oversees the production of his dances worldwide. Most recently, she's been working with the Washington Ballet on staging Mozart's "Divertimento No. 15."Tuesday night there was an open rehearsal and performance at the Kennedy Center Terrace Theatre. While eight hand-picked dancers performed only two of the ballet's five sections, Farrell called the two movements, "Theme and Variations" and "Andante," the "heart of the ballet."
NEWS
November 25, 1994
Erick Hawkins, 85, a choreographer who danced with George Balanchine and Martha Graham and later founded his own dance company, died in New York on Wednesday of cancer. Mr. Hawkins was the first American student at George Balanchine's School of American Ballet. Mr. Hawkins and Ms. Graham married in 1948, then divorced in 1954. President Clinton awarded Mr. Hawkins the National Medal of Arts last month.David Berg, 75, leader of The Children of God, a controversial Christian sect involved in legal conflicts across the world, is dead, his followers said in London yesterday.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | March 24, 1994
"Breakers," a new work that premiered Tuesday night as the Boston Ballet opened a six-day stint at the Kennedy Center Opera House in Washington, is vintage Merce Cunningham.In "Breakers," the legendary choreographer has created a dance that is as opaque and muted as the set of coral, gold, orange and chartreuse rectangles artfully suspended behind the 14 dancers.The work, performed to an original score by John Driscoll, began simply enough. The company formed a circle at one end of the stage, with a single dancer in contrast at the other.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 19, 2000
Ballet Theatre of Maryland's 20th Anniversary Gala at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts proved that this company has come of age with its dancing feet planted squarely in the future. As well as spotlighting the creativity and choreography skills of Artistic Director Edward Stewart, who has led Ballet Theatre since 1980, the program revealed the strength and depth of the company, and the skills of its principal dancers, soloists and guest artists. For "Soirees Musicales," the entire company assembled on stage for a lively "March" opening.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 25, 1997
Go figure: Ballet is at the same time one of the most popular high-culture art forms in America, and one of the most intimidating. Countless pleasure-loving people who go to museums or the opera without a second thought freeze up when it comes to tutu-and-leotard shows. What's the problem - or, as my New York friends say, what's not to like? The answer, so far as I can tell, is twofold: (1) Jargon. (2) "Swan Lake."Ballet talk is the worst jargon in the world, partly because it's mostly in French and partly because far too many balletomanes (that's ballet talk for dance buffs)
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS | August 9, 1993
Say "business" and you probably imagine columns of figures marching in close-order drill across a computer screen. Yuck."To embrace accuracy as the ultimate goal of truth, in any sphere, does appeal to the part of us that pleasures in mastery -- and being able to color within the lines," Mindy Aloff writes in "Beautiful Theories" (Atlantic Monthly, July 1993). "This mastery is crucial to human development . . . but it is not as freeing as the notion of playfulness -- of improvisation -- for which one has to throw away the coloring books and begin with a blank page, a ready hand, and an open mind."
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin DTC and J. L. Conklin DTC,Contributing Writer | March 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The program that Dance Theatre of Harlem selected to open its two-week run last night at the Kennedy Center did not feature a world premiere, but the program did offer ballet excitement as only this company can deliver.Opening the evening was "The Four Temperaments" to music by Paul Hindemith. This beautiful and difficult abstract ballet by George Balanchine usually closes the program of lesser ballet companies, but DTH announced its D.C. arrival with a finely tuned and vigorous performance.
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