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NEWS
August 25, 2005
On August 23, 2005, DOROTHY DAVIS BAILEY-SILVERBURG. In loving memory of my late husband and father of our children, George L. Bailey, Jr.; devoted mother of John Bailey, Doris Westfall, Steven Bailey, George Bailey, III and Ilsa Bailey. Last survivor of the Davis family; devoted sister of the late Sonny, Evelyn, Bonnie and Louie Davis. Special thanks to her loving brother-in-law, Leonard Piper and sister-in-law, Belle Davis. Also survived by seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2008
Every Christmas, millions of Americans get a close look at the pain and hysteria of a run on a bank when George Bailey contemplates suicide after panicked customers demand their money from his tiny savings and loan in the Frank Capra classic It's a Wonderful Life. In the movie, George's friends and neighbors raise the money to pay depositors, and the bank is saved. Rules established to insure deposits and limit risks have made recent, real-life runs less painful. Now, investors have a different reason to be afraid.
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NEWS
By Margaret Erickson and Margaret Erickson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2007
Silence and darkness flooded the auditorium as a string of prayers emanated from above focusing on a single man, George Bailey. The pervading question: "What makes a man so desperate as to consider suicide on Christmas Eve?" River Hill High School's recent production of It's a Wonderful Life tells a tale of the triumph of love during difficult times and illustrates a newfound appreciation of friendship and life. Straying slightly from the original 1946 film by Frank Capra, the River Hill production of It's a Wonderful Life recounted the story of George Bailey, who is given a chance to reflect on his life and the effect he has had on others.
NEWS
By Annie Korzen | December 12, 2007
I don't much care for films that celebrate "small-town values." I always feel judged, even personally attacked, by these movies. When the restless Jenny in Forrest Gump leaves town and ends up an ex-junkie dying of AIDS, I read it as a threat to any woman who doesn't stay put and marry the town idiot. This time of year, I'm inevitably confronted with another movie that really disturbs me, It's a Wonderful Life. Yes, Jimmy Stewart is captivating and Donna Reed is radiant, but I find the story very depressing.
NEWS
March 8, 2003
On March 5, 2003, MARY BETTY BAILEY, beloved wife of George Bailey, dear mother of Rose M. Swan and the late Judy A. Brumfield, loving grandmother of April L. DePetris, great-grandmother of Gabriella M. DePetris, devoted sister-in-law of Robert B. Bailey and his wife Renee of Australia. Also survived by numerous nieces and nephews. Funeral from the Chesapeake Christian Center on Monday at 10 A.M. Interment in Cedar Hill Cemetery. Family requests friends call on Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at the family owned George J. Gonce Funeral Home, P.A., 169 Riviera Drive, Pasadena.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 9, 2006
It's surprising that the great filmmaker Frank Capra never made a movie of Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People. Like the title character in Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Ibsen's protagonist, Dr. Stockmann, takes on the political power structure. And like George Bailey in Capra's It's a Wonderful Life, Dr. Stockmann is -- at least initially -- concerned with the welfare of the people. But at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, with the exception of Joseph Urla's carefully nuanced Dr. Stockmann, most of the portrayals of Ibsen's characters come across merely as foils, lacking dimension or shading.
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 2000
George Bailey sings! Though it's hard to picture James Stewart's George Bailey breaking into song in the 1946 Frank Capra film "It's a Wonderful Life," seeing the tale as a musical at Toby's Dinner Theatre is not as odd as you might think. The story has all the ingredients for a good musical. It has a likable hero in George Bailey, a dreamer who never gets out of his hometown of Bedford Falls. It has an attractive love story between George and Mary Hatch (Donna Reed in the movie). There's a guardian angel (Clarence, a kindly bumbler looking to earn his wings)
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and By Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | December 22, 2002
I own a piece of Bedford Falls -- 320 Sycamore, to be precise. Here, George Bailey, his wife and four kids lived a wonderful life, although he didn't realize it until it nearly slipped through his grasp. Now, I must decide whether this purchase was a wise investment -- or a boondoggle prompted by my subconscious response to Sept. 11. Besides, the place needs work. The Bailey home and three other buildings synonymous with the 1946 classic film starring Jimmy Stewart are available from Walgreens, the nation's largest drugstore chain, as part of its first It's a Wonderful Life illuminated village series.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | December 24, 1996
BOSTON -- So why am I spending another holiday season in Bedford Falls rather than, say, Disney World?How did ''It's a Wonderful Life'' become the ultimate Christmas classic, leaving even Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer in the shadows?It's exactly 50 years since George Bailey, small-town banker and self-described failure, first contemplated cinematic suicide on Christmas Eve.The dark journey through his disappointed dreams doesn't seem like a deck-the-halls sort of flick.No amount of colorizing could make this a joyful palette until the angel Clarence leads George on a tour of what Bedford Falls would have been like without him. As Jimmy Stewart once said, Frank Capra ''made you pay for the happy endings.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 2001
Now in its fifth incarnation, Pasadena Theatre Company's It's a Wonderful Life has become a local holiday tradition. Although the location might change from year to year, the company's president, Sharon Steele, who has directed every production of the show, says there are reasons for the show's enduring popularity with audiences - and with performers. "The reason the cast and audience members return year after year, either to perform or to see the show, is because each year reaffirms their beliefs in the value of their own lives as well as the lives of their friends and loved ones," Steele said.
NEWS
By Margaret Erickson and Margaret Erickson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2007
Silence and darkness flooded the auditorium as a string of prayers emanated from above focusing on a single man, George Bailey. The pervading question: "What makes a man so desperate as to consider suicide on Christmas Eve?" River Hill High School's recent production of It's a Wonderful Life tells a tale of the triumph of love during difficult times and illustrates a newfound appreciation of friendship and life. Straying slightly from the original 1946 film by Frank Capra, the River Hill production of It's a Wonderful Life recounted the story of George Bailey, who is given a chance to reflect on his life and the effect he has had on others.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | September 9, 2006
It's surprising that the great filmmaker Frank Capra never made a movie of Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy of the People. Like the title character in Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Ibsen's protagonist, Dr. Stockmann, takes on the political power structure. And like George Bailey in Capra's It's a Wonderful Life, Dr. Stockmann is -- at least initially -- concerned with the welfare of the people. But at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, with the exception of Joseph Urla's carefully nuanced Dr. Stockmann, most of the portrayals of Ibsen's characters come across merely as foils, lacking dimension or shading.
NEWS
August 25, 2005
On August 23, 2005, DOROTHY DAVIS BAILEY-SILVERBURG. In loving memory of my late husband and father of our children, George L. Bailey, Jr.; devoted mother of John Bailey, Doris Westfall, Steven Bailey, George Bailey, III and Ilsa Bailey. Last survivor of the Davis family; devoted sister of the late Sonny, Evelyn, Bonnie and Louie Davis. Special thanks to her loving brother-in-law, Leonard Piper and sister-in-law, Belle Davis. Also survived by seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 10, 2004
This Sunday, the Senator Theatre presents its annual Maryland Food Bank benefit showing of Frank Capra's It's A Wonderful Life (together with the wonderful 1951 A Christmas Carol, starring Alastair Sim). For decades, the exuberant comedy and affecting drama of this seasonal favorite has propelled audiences past its mawkishness and message-mongering. It's an ode to a small-town American life that no longer is, and possibly never was. It gives James Stewart the role of his career as George Bailey, the village good guy who never rises in the world because he's too busy giving a shoulder-up to everyone else he knows.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2004
Anyone in need of revved-up holiday spirits should catch Pasadena Theatre Company's It's a Wonderful Life this weekend. Having seen this show several times since 1997, I found this most recent production still enchanting. The play is based on Frank Capra's 1946 film classic, which starred James Stewart as Bedford Falls banker George Bailey, who discovers that "no man is a failure who has friends." With the help of his wingless guardian angel, Clarence, a despondent George learns that he has profoundly affected the lives of his friends, co-workers and family.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2004
Now in its seventh incarnation, Pasadena Theatre Company's It's a Wonderful Life has become a local holiday tradition rivaling Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Having directed all of the company's productions of this stage adaptation of the 1946 Frank Capra film, Sharon Steele, president of the company, finds several reasons for the show's continuing popularity with audiences and performers. "We skipped last year after doing the show for six consecutive years, and now we're back to this story that endures because it deals with World War II-era patriotism and family values," she said.
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 12, 1997
Strong voices and sappy lyrics combine to make "It's a Wonderful Life" a good sentimental evening for the whole family during holiday time.The musical version of the Frank Capra film classic appears at Toby's Dinner Theatre for the third time, continuing through Jan. 18.For the few who have not seen the movie, the story focuses on George Bailey, a man whose life never seems to go the way he has planned in the small town of Bedford Falls.In a moment of crisis, Bailey wishes he had never been born, and, with the help of angel Clarence, he gets to see his wish fulfilled.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 28, 2003
A Baltimore Christmas-season tradition continues this weekend with showings of It's a Wonderful Life and A Christmas Carol at the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road. It would be hard to go wrong seeing either, even if it would be for the umpteenth time. Life, Frank Capra's 1945 classic, is simply one of the most honestly emotional films ever made, as small-town banker George Bailey comes to realize that riches have nothing to do with fame or profit, everything to do with treating your fellow man right.
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