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George Armistead

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Mary Carole McCauley | September 8, 2014
A rare and previously unknown letter by George Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, is going under the auction gavel this week at an auction house in Chesapeake City, Cecil County. The May 3, 1811 letter, which has an estimated value of $20,000 to $30,000, throws new light about the commissioning of the giant flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. It will be auctioned off Tuesday or Wednesday at Alexander Historical Auctions on behalf of a private collector.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Alas, they still haven't found the missing star. But several fragments of the 30-foot-by-42-foot star-spangled banner that flew over Fort McHenry after the Battle of Baltimore are up for sale this week at a Boston auction house. Pre-bidding is under way for the 3-inch-by-3-inch swatches of the flag, a smaller version of which inspired Francis Scott Key to write the song that became the national anthem. Bidding at RR Auction began at $10,000 but is expected to go much higher. Live auction bidding will begin at 3 p.m. Thursday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Alas, they still haven't found the missing star. But several fragments of the 30-foot-by-42-foot star-spangled banner that flew over Fort McHenry after the Battle of Baltimore are up for sale this week at a Boston auction house. Pre-bidding is under way for the 3-inch-by-3-inch swatches of the flag, a smaller version of which inspired Francis Scott Key to write the song that became the national anthem. Bidding at RR Auction began at $10,000 but is expected to go much higher. Live auction bidding will begin at 3 p.m. Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
Mary Carole McCauley | September 8, 2014
A rare and previously unknown letter by George Armistead, commander of Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore, is going under the auction gavel this week at an auction house in Chesapeake City, Cecil County. The May 3, 1811 letter, which has an estimated value of $20,000 to $30,000, throws new light about the commissioning of the giant flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore. It will be auctioned off Tuesday or Wednesday at Alexander Historical Auctions on behalf of a private collector.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Decades of careful restoration and study have revealed a lot about the flag that flew over Fort McHenry after its defenders fought off a naval attack during the War of 1812: the swatches taken as mementos of the pivotal battle, the areas worn by time, perhaps even sections damaged by British mortar fire. But a gaping hole at the center of the original Star-Spangled Banner presents a question that no one has been able to answer: What happened to the missing star? "It's a major mystery," said Lonn Taylor, a retired historian who helped the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History reconstruct the story of the flag in the century after it left the fort and before it entered the museum's collection.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
On most days, Tony Wheeler of Arnold is a guide for a company that offers historic tours in Maryland. But on Sunday, Wheeler became part of history himself. Wheeler, wearing a top hat and early 19th-century attire, joined hundreds of volunteers at the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore to help sew a reproduction of the original Star-Spangled Banner. "This is the first time I sewed in my life," said Wheeler, 78, after adding his stitch to the hem of the flag. The project is part of events marking the bicentennial of the War of 1812.
NEWS
April 28, 2003
On April 26, 2003, BETTY WASHINGTON WHITING; beloved daughter of the late Mary Susan (nee Butler) and George Armistead Whiting; dear aunt of Lewis Butler Whiting Jr., Suzannne Whiting Evans and the late Mary Carlyle Carter. Also survived by many great-neices and great-nephews. A graveside service will be held Wednesday 11 A.M. at Druid Ridge Cemetery. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to The American Heart Association MD Affiliate, Inc. 415 N. Charles Street Baltimore, 21201.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
Norman Benton, 72, fondly remembers his childhood days of fishing and swimming in Fort Armistead Park, a 45-acre area on the Baltimore City-Anne Arundel line named after a local War of 1812 commander. The Hanover resident thinks the fort is "beautiful." Del. Joan Cadden recalls that she went there every year as a child for Easter egg hunts or to watch ships cruise by on their way into Baltimore harbor. The park used to have a playground, the Brooklyn Park Democrat says, and the fort's underground tunnels were a great attraction for teens, who would explore the dark areas in groups.
NEWS
November 23, 2008
For those who love Maryland's place in American history, there is no more precious artifact than the oversized American flag that flew triumphantly over Fort McHenry in the dawn's early light on the morning of Sept. 14, 1814, after a futile British assault that marked one of the turning points in the War of 1812. The flag and the fort were center stage when Francis Scott Key framed "The Star-Spangled Banner" a song that much later became our vocally challenging national anthem. Major George Armistead, who commanded the American force at Fort McHenry, commissioned Mary Pickersgill, a Baltimore flag maker, to sew a flag "so large that the British will have no difficulty seeing it from a distance."
NEWS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1997
The National Park Service and two nonprofit organizations signed a five-year agreement yesterday on improvements for the disabled at national parks in a ceremony at Fort McHenry.Under the pact -- signed after the demonstration of a system designed to aid blind visitors to the park -- the National Center on Accessibility will help the park service find volunteers from the Telephone Pioneers of America to help the park service complete projects it deems necessary to help the disabled."Our goal is to assist the National Park Service in projects that they've identified that they might not be able to do as part of their regular budget," said Gary Robb, executive director of the National Center on Accessibility.
NEWS
By Andy Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Decades of careful restoration and study have revealed a lot about the flag that flew over Fort McHenry after its defenders fought off a naval attack during the War of 1812: the swatches taken as mementos of the pivotal battle, the areas worn by time, perhaps even sections damaged by British mortar fire. But a gaping hole at the center of the original Star-Spangled Banner presents a question that no one has been able to answer: What happened to the missing star? "It's a major mystery," said Lonn Taylor, a retired historian who helped the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History reconstruct the story of the flag in the century after it left the fort and before it entered the museum's collection.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2013
On most days, Tony Wheeler of Arnold is a guide for a company that offers historic tours in Maryland. But on Sunday, Wheeler became part of history himself. Wheeler, wearing a top hat and early 19th-century attire, joined hundreds of volunteers at the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore to help sew a reproduction of the original Star-Spangled Banner. "This is the first time I sewed in my life," said Wheeler, 78, after adding his stitch to the hem of the flag. The project is part of events marking the bicentennial of the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Ilene Hollin and Ilene Hollin,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
Federal officials and high school students launched a joint effort yesterday to clean up Fort Armistead Park, an abandoned historical landmark and waterfront property in Hawkins Point. The 45-acre park is in disarray, with overgrown bushes, littered grounds, a driftwood- and trash-filled beach, and a nonfunctional dock. The remains of the buildings are covered with graffiti, and the ground is blanketed with glass shards and beer bottles. Built in 1898, the fort was named after Maj. George Armistead, who commanded Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
Alexander Gordon IV, a bankruptcy attorney and author, died May 10 at his Easton home. He was 59. According to Walter B. Gunby, a Cambridge attorney and Mr. Gordon's personal and legal representative, the cause of death was arteriosclerosis. Mr. Gordon, whose father had been a banker and executive director of the Maryland State Bar Association, was born in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton. He was a descendant of Col. George Armistead, defender of Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.
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