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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
EVEN IF you never learned to figure the footage of an area rug, the colorful shapes in this fall's retail racks will convince you that geometry is your strong suit.The brights have been seen for several seasons, but pieced and patched designs in unconventional combinations are a fresh twist.This punch of color is just the shot in the arm -- or shoulder or collar -- fashion needs to brighten the dressing picture in these budget-conscious times."Color is a gift and doesn't need to carry an astronomical price tag," says Aniko Gaal Schott.
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Jun-ichi Igusa, a retired Johns Hopkins university professor of mathematics who researched number theory and algebraic geometry, died of a stroke Nov. 24 at the Holly Hill Nursing Home. The Hunt Valley resident was 89. "He was a giant in his field," said Bernard Shiffman, chair of the Hopkins mathematics department. "He was meticulous in everything he did. Even when he taught elementary calculus, he was thorough and prepared his classes perfectly. He was warm to people and interested in helping his students.
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By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | June 13, 2007
The Baltimore school board voted unanimously last night to pass a waiver allowing 1,400 sophomores to move on to their junior year even though they didn't take a mandated math course. The board requires high school sophomores to take and pass geometry to be promoted to 11th grade. But the 1,400 students instead spent this year taking an Algebra 1 review course, after failing the state algebra exam that they must pass to graduate. Diplomas City gets low mark for graduation rate. pg 3B
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Gen. David Petraeus likes to talk about battlefield geometry. It's his turn of phrase for describing troop deployments in Iraq. The mathematical configuration is changing again, the size of U.S. ground forces shifting once more. But it's not soon enough for many American soldiers whose tours have left them scarred in ways seen and unseen and their families struggling to cope against tough odds. A reduction in combat tours from 15 to 12 months was announced last week, as a gesture to replenish military readiness.
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By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1997
The mathematical barrier between algebra and geometry is about to be torn down in Howard County's schools.In a new program being tested at three county high schools, the traditionally separate, yearlong classes of Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2 are being merged into a three-year course that mixes numeric, algebraic and geometric concepts -- along with a heavy dose of statistics and probability.Quadratic equationsBeginning algebra students no longer will be swamped with a year's worth of deciphering quadratic equations and solving for X.And geometry students won't spend a year seeing nothing but isosceles triangles and obtuse angles.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 1998
INSPIRED BY the film "Hearts and Hands," mathematics teacher Theda Mayer and her Long Reach High School students decided to create a sampler quilt as a hands-on way to learn about history, geometry and art.But nobody anticipated the result -- which proved to be a lesson in giving.The film presents a history of the United States through quilts. And learning history, geometry and art were the goals Mayer put forth when she applied for an education grant to cover costs of the project, which she titled, "Sampler Quilt Geometry, Measurement and Reasoning."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 1993
NEW YORK -- To say that Beverly Davidman is an unconventional math teacher would be an understatement. She struts in front of the chalkboard like a rap performer, dispensing both attitude and wisdom.Call her Queen Math Teacher."You can pass if you listen; skipping makes you miss it," she says in a syncopated beat to her students at Norman Thomas High School in Manhattan. "So don't try to dis it. Just heed the word as I serve geometry on the board.""Let's hear it for the theorem metho-o-od," the teacher calls out, her arms swaying back and forth.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
Baltimore County geometry teachers reviewed new ways of teaching geometry yesterday as part of a revamped mathematics curriculum intended to better prepare students for statewide and national achievement tests, including the SAT.They were among about 470 middle and high school math teachers who met at Loch Raven High School to prepare for the new school year, which begins Monday. Countywide, groups of teachers with specialties in foreign languages, arts, physical education and reading met to review new curriculum guidelines and textbooks.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
Baltimore County geometry teachers reviewed new ways of teaching geometry yesterday as part of a revamped mathematics curriculum intended to better prepare students for statewide and national achievement tests, including the SAT.They were among about 470 middle and high school math teachers who met at Loch Raven High School to prepare for the new school year, which begins Monday. Countywide, groups of teachers with specialties in foreign languages, arts, physical education and reading met to review new curriculum guidelines and textbooks.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
At first, there's nothing more than carefully measured lines, with numbers written neatly on the page. The graph with precisely plotted dots looks like a math problem being solved until the lines, dots and calculations come together into a pencil sketch of something recognizable - an airplane, or several. The finished products of aviation artist Keith Ferris are realistic-looking oil paintings of vintage and military aircraft. Ferris has paintings on display at the National Air and Space Museum and the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | June 13, 2007
The Baltimore school board voted unanimously last night to pass a waiver allowing 1,400 sophomores to move on to their junior year even though they didn't take a mandated math course. The board requires high school sophomores to take and pass geometry to be promoted to 11th grade. But the 1,400 students instead spent this year taking an Algebra 1 review course, after failing the state algebra exam that they must pass to graduate. Diplomas City gets low mark for graduation rate. pg 3B
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 26, 2007
Thanks to Renee Hilliard, my days of being asked to help my nieces, nephews, cousins and grandkids with math may be over. About 10 years ago, when my baby sister asked me to tutor my niece in geometry, I was nearly overcome with what, in medical terms, is called "syncope and collapse." That would be fainting in plain, simple, everyday-people English. Yes, I had gotten an A in geometry during my sophomore year at Baltimore City College. And I had a darned fun time doing it, too. Our teacher had this wonderful policy of allowing those students who maintained a 90-or-better average to bypass the final exam.
NEWS
By Gerald Neily | February 21, 2007
When the Baltimore Beltway was completed in the early 1960s, it was part of a transportation revolution. Beginning with mankind's first dirt trails, the purpose of transportation facilities had always been to connect places where people wanted to go. The Baltimore Beltway (Interstate 695) was one of the first highways built for the express purpose of allowing people to avoid a particular place - Baltimore. Before the Beltway, the city was the inevitable focus of regional commerce, but the Beltway made it easy to avoid the city.
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By WILL ENGLUND and WILL ENGLUND,SUN REPORTER | June 18, 2006
The Stolen Prince Hugh Barnes Farrar, Straus and Giroux / 324 pages / $27.95 Russia has never exactly been a magnet for immigrants, but over the centuries foreigners have kept showing up, and their experiences have been unlike those of strangers anywhere else, certainly anywhere else in Europe. Foreigners can never become un-foreign among Russians, but they can become what you might call adjunct members of Russian society, and even gain a fair measure of respect from the chronically insecure people around them.
FEATURES
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | February 14, 2006
Before the backstage mirror, barely dressed dancers fret about limp curls, gooseflesh and uneven panty fringe. But Catherine Bohne stands apart from them in her four-inch-high Mary Janes, contemplating a more serious problem: Her cat ate her pasties. It happened about 11:30 p.m. Friday, the eve of this, her first-ever burlesque performance, when the two red, sparkly stars were to be all that stood between her and total toplessness. She discovered their mangled remains on the floor of the spare bedroom, cursed out the cat and despaired.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
At first, there's nothing more than carefully measured lines, with numbers written neatly on the page. The graph with precisely plotted dots looks like a math problem being solved until the lines, dots and calculations come together into a pencil sketch of something recognizable - an airplane, or several. The finished products of aviation artist Keith Ferris are realistic-looking oil paintings of vintage and military aircraft. Ferris has paintings on display at the National Air and Space Museum and the Pentagon.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
Anne Arundel County schools officials will likely appeal a ruling that special-education students at three county high schools did not meet state standards on part of the Maryland School Assessments, officials said yesterday. Arundel, North County and Glen Burnie high schools missed targets on the geometry exam, which 10th-graders took last spring. Superintendent Eric J. Smith said the test results have identified a problem, and the school system would focus more resources toward additional support, such as co-teaching, in which a regular teacher teams with a special-education teacher.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
In another round of graduation requirement changes that are to take effect in the next school year, students will be required to take the Maryland School Assessment test for geometry - and, therefore, the class - according to a report submitted to Carroll County's school board last night. The report reflects recent changes made by state education officials, said Steve Johnson, director of curriculum and instruction for the county school district. "The state has now decided the 10th-grade geometry test must be taken," Johnson said.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
Passing scores were set yesterday for a statewide high school English test that will soon become a graduation requirement and could prevent large numbers of students from obtaining a diploma. If the test given to 10th-graders last year counted today, 57.3 percent of students would pass. State education officials expect the passing rate to rise by as much as 30 percent when students know that how they do will determine whether they graduate. The test will be given to ninth-, 10th- and 11th-graders, depending on when they are taught the material covered in the test.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
Anne Arundel County schools officials will likely appeal a ruling that special-education students at three county high schools did not meet state standards on part of the Maryland School Assessments, officials said yesterday. Arundel, North County and Glen Burnie high schools missed targets on the geometry exam, which 10th-graders took last spring. Superintendent Eric J. Smith said the test results have identified a problem, and the school system would focus more resources toward additional support, such as co-teaching, in which a regular teacher teams with a special-education teacher.
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