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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Lawrence Alexander Hardie, a retired Johns Hopkins University geology professor who successfully challenged an assumption about ocean salinity, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Dec. 17 at the Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula in Monterey, Calif. The former Pasadena and Windsor Hills resident was 80. Born in Durban, South Africa, he earned a degree at the University of Natal in that city and moved to Baltimore in 1960 for graduate study in geology at Johns Hopkins.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Lawrence Alexander Hardie, a retired Johns Hopkins University geology professor who successfully challenged an assumption about ocean salinity, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Dec. 17 at the Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula in Monterey, Calif. The former Pasadena and Windsor Hills resident was 80. Born in Durban, South Africa, he earned a degree at the University of Natal in that city and moved to Baltimore in 1960 for graduate study in geology at Johns Hopkins.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The last statewide map of Maryland geology, published in 1968, is out of print. Online versions of it are marked with a disclaimer that it's too imprecise for anything but "historical and illustrative purposes. " But a push to drill for Marcellus shale could help bring it into the 21st century. The Maryland Geological Survey this month published a new map of Western Maryland that could guide potential shale exploration there and be a first step in redrawing a statewide map. Geologists say it's a sign of the state of the industry — over the decades, funding going toward geology research and mapping for its own sake has dwindled.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
When Debra Buczkowski was 7, in 1976, NASA's Viking space probes were landing on Mars and sending images of the red planet back to Earth as part of their $1 billion mission. “I realized that no matter where I went on this planet, I couldn't pick up anything in those photos,” the New York native says, recalling how that mesmerized her. Her early appreciation for the wonders of astronomy led to a career mapping structures on other rocky bodies like Earth, such as Mercury and Mars, as opposed to the gas giants, like Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, she says.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Francis J. Pettijohn, former head of the department of geology at the Johns Hopkins University, died Friday of congestive heart failure at Glen Meadows retirement community in Glen Arm. He was 94.Dr. Pettijohn, who joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 1952, was chairman of the department of geology from 1963 to 1968. He retired in 1973.The former longtime Towson resident was considered the founder of modern sedimentology, which is the study of Precambrian rocks more than 500 million years old and the environment in which they were created by waterborne sediments.
FEATURES
By John R. Alden and John R. Alden,Special to the sun | June 21, 1998
"Annals of the Former World," by John A. McPhee. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 624 pages, with 25 maps. $40. Annals of the Former World" is a seven hundred page block of a book about geology-specifically, the geology of the United States as seen from Interstate 80 on its transcontinental run from New York to San Francisco. Not only is this book about old stuff; it is old stuff.Except for a 40-page chapter called "Crossing the Craton," this volume consists of four books ("Basin and Range," "In Suspect Terrain," "Rising From the Plains," and "Assembling California")
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Kenneth N. Weaver, who for nearly 30 years headed the Maryland Geological Survey, which named its Baltimore headquarters for him, died July 7 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Jacksonville resident was 83. Dr. Weaver, the son of Reformed Mennonite farmers, was born and raised in Lancaster County, Pa. After graduating from East Lampeter High School in 1945, he joined the merchant marine and served aboard ships as a radio operator in the South Pacific in the fading days of World War II. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1997
Interest in rocks is increasing -- thanks to the rover called Sojourner that zips around Mars checking out the stony terrain.This weekend, several Baltimore-area residents saw firsthand some impressive millions-years-old rock formations much closer to home -- in the Towson area and Hunt Valley.They descended on such unassuming places as Luskin's hill near the Baltimore Beltway. A Towson University parking lot. Loch Raven Reservoir's lower dam. And behind Hunt Valley Mall.These everyday settings in the Piedmont region of the East Coast where Baltimore County lies are prime geological examples of the remnants of continents that collided and sea levels that rose and fell millions of years ago."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 15, 2011
John Mackenzie Wilson, who mapped the Eastern Shore for the Maryland Geological Survey, died of a lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, July 3 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Fells Point resident was 57. Born in Salisbury, England, he was the son of an English scientist who took an exchange job at Edgewood Arsenal. The family sailed to the U.S. on the Queen Elizabeth and settled in Towson. Mr. Wilson was a 1972 Towson High School graduate and earned a bachelor of science degree in geology at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Glen Collins and Glen Collins,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2002
TOWN OF RAMAPO, N.Y. - "This is my Rosetta Stone," Alexander E. Gates was saying as he stood before a vast chunk of rock near Lake Tiorati in Harriman State Park. A video crew was capturing his every syllable. "A single rock outcrop can reveal the entire geologic history of this park," he said. "And this one shows evidence of a continental collision where two of the Earth's plates hit together, and then later, hot magma intruded at 1,000 degrees centigrade." He gestured toward the gray wall.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The last statewide map of Maryland geology, published in 1968, is out of print. Online versions of it are marked with a disclaimer that it's too imprecise for anything but "historical and illustrative purposes. " But a push to drill for Marcellus shale could help bring it into the 21st century. The Maryland Geological Survey this month published a new map of Western Maryland that could guide potential shale exploration there and be a first step in redrawing a statewide map. Geologists say it's a sign of the state of the industry — over the decades, funding going toward geology research and mapping for its own sake has dwindled.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
It has been a fallow interval at the blog because of some hectic days at the paragraph factory, domestic exigencies, and the like, but I am back today to advocate, in my small way, sanity. Immediately after the late election, the outbreaks of looniness came thick and fast. A gentleman wrote to The Baltimore Sun to say that he was halting all charitable donations and putting his resources into bottled water and ammo, presumably against the collapse of civil order that President Obama's re-election made inevitable.
NEWS
By Sun Staff | September 15, 2012
The U.S. Geological Survey Saturday reported an early-morning earthquake of 2.1 magnitude in parts of western Carroll County and eastern Frederick County. The USGS said the epicenter was about three miles from Linganore, in Frederick County, and about 11 miles from Westminster in Carroll. A spokesman at Linganore Winecellars in Mount Airy said the vineyard had no awareness of the quake. According to the Richter scale, a 2.0 magnitude earthquake is large enough to be detected but generally not felt.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Each week The Sun's  John McIntyre  presents a moderately obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar - another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: AUTOCHTHONOUS That Greek root autos , "self," has gotten around. An automobile is a vehicle you drive yourself. Autonomy is self-government or independence. Autarchy is a policy of self-sufficiency. An autodidact is a self-taught person.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
John Mackenzie Wilson, who mapped the Eastern Shore for the Maryland Geological Survey, died of a lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, July 3 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Fells Point resident was 57. Born in Salisbury, England, he was the son of an English scientist who took an exchange job at Edgewood Arsenal. The family sailed to the U.S. on the Queen Elizabeth and settled in Towson. Mr. Wilson was a 1972 Towson High School graduate and earned a bachelor of science degree in geology at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Kenneth N. Weaver, who for nearly 30 years headed the Maryland Geological Survey, which named its Baltimore headquarters for him, died July 7 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Jacksonville resident was 83. Dr. Weaver, the son of Reformed Mennonite farmers, was born and raised in Lancaster County, Pa. After graduating from East Lampeter High School in 1945, he joined the merchant marine and served aboard ships as a radio operator in the South Pacific in the fading days of World War II. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1998
John F. "Jed" Jedlicka, a longtime school principal whose passion for geology took him on field trips around the world and earned him the affectionate nickname, "Mr. Rocks," died of a heart attack Thursday at his Timonium home. He was 66.Mr. Jedlicka was a teacher and administrator with Baltimore County public schools for nearly 40 years until his retirement in PTC 1993, including 14 years as principal of Stemmers Run Middle School and a decade at Pine Grove Middle School.He continued teaching as an adjunct professor at Loyola College, where he had taught geology courses since 1970.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
APEX, N.C.-- --In a small North Carolina garage are Robert Henke's two remaining worldly possessions: a slightly banged-up 1967 Lotus Elan sports car and something that resembles a slim, 6-foot torpedo suspended from an aluminum frame. When he takes it out for the rare spin, the cherry-colored ragtop gets admiring looks from passers-by - though it is the metal cylinder that ought to grab the world's attention. But nobody cares. The product of more than $2 million and 25 years of development, the device might just be the holy grail of earthquake engineering: a probe that can accurately predict the way various soils will react in a major quake.
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