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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 13, 2009
Henry J. Adams, a retired geologist and financier, died of cancer Aug. 5 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 79. Mr. Adams was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. His father, Otto Eugene Adams Sr., was a noted Baltimore architect, and his grandfather, Henry Adams, a mechanical engineer, founded Henry Adams LLC, a Baltimore engineering design company. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1947, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1952 in geology from Lehigh University. He earned a master's degree in geophysics from the University of Pittsburgh in 1954 and served for two years in the Air Force, where he was an analyst at the Lincoln Laboratory in Cambridge, Mass.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Mary E. Weaver, a former nursery school educator who later managed a Baltimore senior living apartment building, died Feb. 22 of complications from leukemia at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Jacksonville-area resident was 82. The daughter of farmers, Mary Elizabeth Hoover was born and raised in Ronks, Pa., in rural Lancaster County. She was a 1948 graduate of East Lamperter High School, and two years later married Kenneth N. Weaver, a geologist. The couple lived in the city's Pimlico neighborhood.
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NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1997
Charles Butler Hunt, a noted geologist and former Johns Hopkins University professor of geography, died Sept. 3 of heart failure at his Salt Lake City home. The former Baltimore resident was 91.Mr. Hunt's career with the U.S. Geological Survey began in 1930 and lasted until 1961, when he accepted a teaching position at Hopkins.The tall, lanky Mr. Hunt's work took him into the remote reaches of the Henry Mountains in Utah, Death Valley, the Colorado River and Mount Taylor in New Mexico, where he studied the geology and then painstakingly recorded the information in descriptive texts that were later published and studied by scholars and scientists.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Most people throw out a jug of milk after a week or so. The oldest bottle of wine, on the other hand, is the most savored. But what about water? Some of what comes out of faucets in Annapolis, Leonardtown or Easton, it turns out, is older than the finest vintage — and the practice of dairy farming itself. Glaciers that melted more than two million years ago deposited layers of sediment around what is now the Chesapeake Bay. Underground rivers run between those layers, tapped by wells and recharged by rainfall over time.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1997
The Frederick County Planning Commission has rejected a proposed gas station near Mount Airy after a consulting geologist testified that spilled gasoline could quickly endanger underground water supplies.Shell Oil Co.'s proposal to open a gas station, convenience store and carwash on Lakeview Drive south of the Interstate 70 interchange met strong opposition from residents at a hearing Wednesday. The debate focused on the fragility of rock underlying the site and the potential for contamination.
NEWS
April 4, 2006
Thomas A. Whiles, an artist and former oil company geologist, died of spinal melanoma Wednesday at his Towson home. He was 58. Mr. Whiles was born in San Antonio, Texas, and raised in Midland, Texas. In 1969, he earned a bachelor's degree in music from North Texas State University in Denton. During the 1980s, he earned a bachelor's degree in earth geology, and in the 1990s, a bachelor's degree in mathematics, both from the University of Texas of the Permian Basin in Odessa. In the 1970s, Mr. Whiles began working in the drafting department of Conoco Oil Co., and in the early 1980s took a similar post at Union Texas Petroleum.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | October 23, 1991
The great Sphinx of Egypt, one of the world's most famous and enigmatic monuments, may be thousands of years older than archaeologists have believed, says Boston University geologist Robert Schoch, who did a novel analysis of its ancient stone.Schoch reaches his controversial conclusions by saying that the Sphinx shows signs of extensive weathering apparently caused by rainfall. Such weathering, which indicates a much wetter climate than exists today, is not found on the pyramids or any other monuments on the Giza plain, Schoch said.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 28, 2003
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - NASA is poised to dispatch tonight the second of two robot geologists on a $400 million mission to Mars. The Opportunity rover - also known as Mars Exploration Rover-B - will look for evidence of past liquid water on the planet's surface. The goal is to answer one of science's big questions: Were conditions present elsewhere in the universe for life to evolve? Water is considered an essential ingredient for life as we know it. To reach the Martian surface, Opportunity must complete a looping 298 million-mile, seven-month journey, then safely land.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
Johns Hopkins University geologist Bruce Marsh often finds his thoughts drifting to two Antarctic explorers who raced each other to the South Pole nearly a century ago.One, Roald Amundsen, was a Norwegian -- meticulous, disciplined and supremely confident. The other, an Englishman named Robert Scott, was arrogant, ill-prepared and close-minded.Amundsen triumphed. Scott and his crew perished on the Antarctic ice.At the end of this year, Mr. Marsh and two graduate students will step from a helicopter and onto the Antarctic plains, where, for a month, they will fend for themselves while conducting their geologic survey.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
Orange plastic fencing that once surrounded the sinkhole has slipped several feet in less than a year, David K. Brezinski says, peering down the deep narrow hole in a field not far from the rushing traffic on Interstate 70 in Frederick. The hole's increased size concerns but doesn't surprise the geologist, given the amount of water rushing off a motel parking lot a few steps away. This runoff dissolves the underground limestone - formed in an ancient sea - and enlarges the cluster of sinkholes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Geologists say Tuesday's magnitude-5.8 earthquake in Central Virginia released forces that have probably been building for tens of thousands, perhaps millions, of years. And the event may not be over. "Aftershocks are always a possibility, and they're pretty common," said Jeffrey Halka, director of the Maryland Geological Survey. The Maryland Emergency Management Agency quoted geology experts saying that for 24 hours after a quake there is a 10 percent chance of an aftershock of a similar magnitude.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
John Mackenzie Wilson, who mapped the Eastern Shore for the Maryland Geological Survey, died of a lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, July 3 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Fells Point resident was 57. Born in Salisbury, England, he was the son of an English scientist who took an exchange job at Edgewood Arsenal. The family sailed to the U.S. on the Queen Elizabeth and settled in Towson. Mr. Wilson was a 1972 Towson High School graduate and earned a bachelor of science degree in geology at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | March 23, 2010
Efforts to shore up the base of the cliffs on the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay could trigger problems for the area's freshest fossil beds - and turn the bay floor into a silty "desert," an expert on the region's geology says. Lauck Ward, a geologist at the Virginia Museum of Natural History who has studied the Maryland and Virginia cliffs for more than 30 years, says the best fossils, laid down as much as 18 million years ago, would be buried by riprap and slumping sand. "Scientifically it would be a wipeout," he said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 13, 2009
Henry J. Adams, a retired geologist and financier, died of cancer Aug. 5 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 79. Mr. Adams was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. His father, Otto Eugene Adams Sr., was a noted Baltimore architect, and his grandfather, Henry Adams, a mechanical engineer, founded Henry Adams LLC, a Baltimore engineering design company. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1947, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1952 in geology from Lehigh University. He earned a master's degree in geophysics from the University of Pittsburgh in 1954 and served for two years in the Air Force, where he was an analyst at the Lincoln Laboratory in Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
April 4, 2006
Thomas A. Whiles, an artist and former oil company geologist, died of spinal melanoma Wednesday at his Towson home. He was 58. Mr. Whiles was born in San Antonio, Texas, and raised in Midland, Texas. In 1969, he earned a bachelor's degree in music from North Texas State University in Denton. During the 1980s, he earned a bachelor's degree in earth geology, and in the 1990s, a bachelor's degree in mathematics, both from the University of Texas of the Permian Basin in Odessa. In the 1970s, Mr. Whiles began working in the drafting department of Conoco Oil Co., and in the early 1980s took a similar post at Union Texas Petroleum.
TOPIC
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
ON DEC. 4, 1811, an enormous cataclysm shook the central United States. It happened again six weeks later, on Jan. 23, and again Feb. 7. Most scientists say that each of the three had magnitudes approaching or above 8.0, stronger than the 1906 San Francisco earthquake - stronger, in fact, than any California earthquake in recorded history. Vibrations from the quakes toppled chimneys hundreds of miles away, cracked sidewalks in Cleveland, rang church bells in Boston and caused the Mississippi to run backward.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2003
When Hollywood actors burrowed into the bowels of the Earth in the thriller The Core, scientists laughed. But now a California geologist is proposing a serious scheme to reach the most inaccessible spot on the planet. "Scientists have mostly assumed it's not possible," says David J. Stevenson, a respected planetary geologist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "But it's not crazy." An outline of Stevenson's plan in the current issue of the British journal Nature would still make a scriptwriter salivate: a crust-cracking nuclear blast, a skyscraper's worth of molten iron, and a spunky, grapefruit-sized probe that can stand up to unimaginable pressure.
TRAVEL
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN OUTDOORS WRITER | November 4, 2001
Maryland is funny looking. Dangly parts on either end, a seemingly straight-edge top and a bottom that might have been drawn by a seismograph. The middle is filled with water -- the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the country. It took Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon four years to survey their way across the state in the mid-1700s. Today, a bicyclist would need about a week. But a walker could get from West Virginia to Pennsylvania via the town of Hancock in about 20 minutes. Just start at the Potomac River, walk up Main Street, turn left onto Pennsylvania Avenue until you reach the border.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 28, 2003
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - NASA is poised to dispatch tonight the second of two robot geologists on a $400 million mission to Mars. The Opportunity rover - also known as Mars Exploration Rover-B - will look for evidence of past liquid water on the planet's surface. The goal is to answer one of science's big questions: Were conditions present elsewhere in the universe for life to evolve? Water is considered an essential ingredient for life as we know it. To reach the Martian surface, Opportunity must complete a looping 298 million-mile, seven-month journey, then safely land.
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