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By Stephanie Stoughton and Stephanie Stoughton,BOSTON GLOBE | June 26, 2000
In his decades-long affair with maps, Ed McNierney has scoured library book sales for yellowed charts, covered walls with maps, and even surveyed the hiking trails near his Groton, Mass., home. But when the 40-year-old software developer brought thousands of the most detailed maps to the Web, he stumbled on a solution to the woes of outdoor enthusiasts and others who follow the nation's charted territory. McNierney's brainchild, Topozone.com, has managed to stitch together seamlessly 58,938 oddly sized and mismatched topographic maps produced by the U.S. Geological Survey.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The last statewide map of Maryland geology, published in 1968, is out of print. Online versions of it are marked with a disclaimer that it's too imprecise for anything but "historical and illustrative purposes. " But a push to drill for Marcellus shale could help bring it into the 21st century. The Maryland Geological Survey this month published a new map of Western Maryland that could guide potential shale exploration there and be a first step in redrawing a statewide map. Geologists say it's a sign of the state of the industry — over the decades, funding going toward geology research and mapping for its own sake has dwindled.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The last statewide map of Maryland geology, published in 1968, is out of print. Online versions of it are marked with a disclaimer that it's too imprecise for anything but "historical and illustrative purposes. " But a push to drill for Marcellus shale could help bring it into the 21st century. The Maryland Geological Survey this month published a new map of Western Maryland that could guide potential shale exploration there and be a first step in redrawing a statewide map. Geologists say it's a sign of the state of the industry — over the decades, funding going toward geology research and mapping for its own sake has dwindled.
NEWS
By Sun Staff | September 15, 2012
The U.S. Geological Survey Saturday reported an early-morning earthquake of 2.1 magnitude in parts of western Carroll County and eastern Frederick County. The USGS said the epicenter was about three miles from Linganore, in Frederick County, and about 11 miles from Westminster in Carroll. A spokesman at Linganore Winecellars in Mount Airy said the vineyard had no awareness of the quake. According to the Richter scale, a 2.0 magnitude earthquake is large enough to be detected but generally not felt.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
1883: The shakes Harford County was shaken by two or three earthquakes the night of March 11 and morning of March 12 in 1883. The intensity, as measured on the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale, was between IV (hanging objects swing, standing cars rock, windows and dishes rattle) and V (sleepers awakened, doors swing, shutters and pictures move). It was noted that some clocks stopped in Fallston. [Source: U.S. Geological Survey]
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2001
Scientists are discovering that mistletoe has more to do with the birds and the bees than just kissing. New research indicates that the romantic Christmas plant, best known for hanging above the head of someone you want to kiss, is essential to several species of birds, bees and animals. The plant is a parasite that attaches itself to trees. But when researchers recently looked at areas where mistletoe had run amok, they found increased populations of bees and birds that feed on the plant's whitish berries.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 7, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- A magnitude-4.8 earthquake shook much of Southern California yesterday, causing a few cracks in buildings near the epicenter and sending some rocks onto a highway.No injuries were reported in the temblor at 12:01 p.m., which scientists at the California Institute of Technology and the U.S. Geological Survey said was outside the aftershock zone of the 1992 Landers and Big Bear earthquakes and therefore was a separate seismic event.The temblor was also unrelated to the earthquake Jan. 17 in Los Angeles' San Fernando Valley that left 61 people dead.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien | October 9, 2007
A minor earthquake was detected yesterday morning in Arbutus, but there was no damage and no reports of injuries, officials said. The U.S. Geological Survey reported that a quake measuring 1.0 on the Richter scale struck about a mile west of the southwestern Baltimore County community about 8:30 a.m. The tremor, reported on the U.S. Geological Survey's Web site, was detected at a depth of about three miles on a seismograph at the Soldiers Delight Reporting...
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
An earthquake in Virginia shook buildings from Georgia to New York yesterday afternoon, causing no serious damage but creating tremors felt in neighborhoods around the Baltimore region. The quake, measuring magnitude 4.5, occurred just before 4 p.m. and was centered about 30 miles west of Richmond. It lasted about 90 seconds and prompted 7,600 calls to the U.S. Geological Survey. Most of the callers experienced "weak to light" shaking of homes and other structures, according to agency officials.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | March 14, 2006
In a move that proponents say could help deal with the state's growing water challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey has agreed to move its regional water science center to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's research and technology park, the university announced yesterday. Groundbreaking is scheduled for June on a 23,500-square-foot building to house the agency's science center, which tracks stream flows, groundwater levels and water quality throughout Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia.
NEWS
July 21, 2012
The conclusions of geological experts on the relationship between fracking and earthquakes are much clearer than letter writer Barbara McNamara suggests ("Fracking is neither safe nor harmless to the environment," July 16). The National Research Council's report unequivocally states that "the process of hydraulic fracturing a well as presently implemented for shale gas recovery does not pose a high risk for inducing felt seismic events. " The 50 earthquakes Mr. McNamara referred to were related to injection wells triggered only small tremors and that continue to be evaluated by federal and state geologists.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2011
John Mackenzie Wilson, who mapped the Eastern Shore for the Maryland Geological Survey, died of a lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, July 3 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Fells Point resident was 57. Born in Salisbury, England, he was the son of an English scientist who took an exchange job at Edgewood Arsenal. The family sailed to the U.S. on the Queen Elizabeth and settled in Towson. Mr. Wilson was a 1972 Towson High School graduate and earned a bachelor of science degree in geology at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2010
Kenneth N. Weaver, who for nearly 30 years headed the Maryland Geological Survey, which named its Baltimore headquarters for him, died July 7 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Jacksonville resident was 83. Dr. Weaver, the son of Reformed Mennonite farmers, was born and raised in Lancaster County, Pa. After graduating from East Lampeter High School in 1945, he joined the merchant marine and served aboard ships as a radio operator in the South Pacific in the fading days of World War II. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2010
S o overwhelmed was Nadege Marc after viewing news coverage of the earthquake in Haiti that she couldn't even begin to face the prospect of seeing firsthand what she calls "the circle of death." A shadow fell over Marc's face as she described watching footage of the blanket-covered heaps of corpses on sidewalks and the mass graves of unidentified bodies. Yet the Veterans Elementary School teacher, who organized a fundraiser among students and staff, said she expects to summon the courage to head to the Caribbean country in the not-too-distant future.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2007
With a near-record drought parching the state, the coming winter will be critical in determining whether Maryland faces even more disastrous crop failures for farmers and strict watering curbs for suburban homeowners in 2008. And while there may be showers today, the prospects for real drought relief in the coming months appear slim. "They're forecasting warm temperatures and dry conditions in the Southeast drought areas at least through spring," said Richard Heim, a meteorologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien | October 9, 2007
A minor earthquake was detected yesterday morning in Arbutus, but there was no damage and no reports of injuries, officials said. The U.S. Geological Survey reported that a quake measuring 1.0 on the Richter scale struck about a mile west of the southwestern Baltimore County community about 8:30 a.m. The tremor, reported on the U.S. Geological Survey's Web site, was detected at a depth of about three miles on a seismograph at the Soldiers Delight Reporting...
NEWS
April 30, 1991
MOSCOW (AP) -- A strong earthquake hit Soviet Georgia yesterday, causing rock slides in mountain villages and killing about 40 people, authorities reported.It was also felt in neighboring Armenia, which was devastated by a 1988 earthquake that killed 25,000 people. There were no reports of damage or injuries in Armenia.Police spokesman Zurab Kadzhaya in the Georgian town of Kutaisi, near the epicenter, said last night that about 40 people were killed and that buildings in five mountain towns had suffered widespread damage.
NEWS
July 21, 2012
The conclusions of geological experts on the relationship between fracking and earthquakes are much clearer than letter writer Barbara McNamara suggests ("Fracking is neither safe nor harmless to the environment," July 16). The National Research Council's report unequivocally states that "the process of hydraulic fracturing a well as presently implemented for shale gas recovery does not pose a high risk for inducing felt seismic events. " The 50 earthquakes Mr. McNamara referred to were related to injection wells triggered only small tremors and that continue to be evaluated by federal and state geologists.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | August 16, 2007
A well has provided Alice and Frank Kushner with water for the 37 years they have lived in their Westminster area home. But in late July, the well went dry. Once the Kushners curtailed showering, washing dishes and doing laundry, some flow returned. Still, the couple decided it was time to connect to Westminster's more reliable public system. With memories of rampant well failures across the metropolitan region during the 2002 drought still vivid, public officials and water resource experts say they are concerned that more private wells could fail over the next month of this bone-dry summer.
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