Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGeographic Society
IN THE NEWS

Geographic Society

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1996
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- As Gil Grosvenor reminisced about his years at the top of the National Geographic Society last week, several times he began a sentence like this: "What's most fun about this job is "Only, each time the sentence ended differently.In order, the most fun was accompanying National Geographic divers to the site of an ancient shipwreck off the Dominican Republic, or watching the magazine's remarkable photographers at work in the field, or hearing firsthand accounts of National Geographic Society explorations from the lips of legendary scientists with names such as Fossey and Leakey and Cousteau.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2010
Emma Carroll Diggs, a homemaker and volunteer, died Nov. 2 of a stroke at Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. She was 97. Emma Carroll Gibbs was born in Danville, Ky., and raised in Adelphia. After graduation from high school, she earned a degree in 1933 from the University of Maryland, College Park. During World War II, Mrs. Diggs, who was known as Emma Carroll, worked in the archives of the National Geographic Society in Washington. In 1942, she married Dr. Everett S. Diggs, a gynecologist, who later established the gynecology and urology divisions at the old Hospital for Women of Maryland on Bolton Hill.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
July 22, 2007
GEOGRAPHY QUIZ -- The Arkansas River begins in which state? (Answer below) Quiz answer (FROM ABOVE) Colorado. Questions from the National Geographic Bee, a program of the National Geographic Society.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2007
GEOGRAPHY QUIZ--Which Swiss city is home to the International Red Cross and a monument honoring leaders of the Protestant Reformation? (Answer below) Quiz answer (FROM ABOVE) Geneva. Questions from the National Geographic Bee, a program of the National Geographic Society.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | December 3, 2006
Irish Christmas If the idea of an Irish Christmas sounds like good craic to ye (a good time to you), then consider a visit to the National Geographic Society in Washington on Thursday or Friday. The society presents the lively concert An Irish Christmas in America, featuring the traditional Irish folk band Teada. Lead vocalist Cathie Ryan, Irish harpist Grainne Hambly, uilleann pipes player Tommy Martin and other artists perform rousing Irish holiday tunes and share stories on the history and traditions of an Irish Christmas.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | November 20, 1992
Students in Allyson Geary's ninth-grade class at Central High School in Independence, Ore., watch the Los Angeles Dodgers on television at home. But when Ms. Geary asked them in September where Los Angeles was, most responded with blank stares.Alarmed, Ms. Geary turned to the National Geographic Society for help. That help has now arrived in the form of the 160,000 geography teaching kits that the society sent to schools earlier this month for use during National Geography Awareness Week, which ends tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Shull and Kathleen Shull,Special to The Evening Sun | January 19, 1991
A visit to the National Geographic Society's Explorers Hall will change any number of museum misconceptions.For example, not all the museums worth driving to Washington, D.C., for are at the Smithsonian Institution. That was certainly the conclusion of a trio of neighborhood friends -- a second-, fourth- and eighth-grader -- who recently visited Explorers Hall, the National Geographic Society's museum devoted to geography and exploration. The three youngsters matched wits with computer quizzes, zoomed a microscope lens onto a live tarantula and stopped a mock tornado with one hand.
NEWS
April 5, 1992
Name: Patrick Edison JacobsHonored by The Carroll County Sun for: Winning the Maryland State Geography Bee, sponsored by National Geographic Society, March 27 in AnnapolisAge: 11Residence; hometown: Mount AiryEducation: Attendedgifted and talented program at Urbana Elementary School in FrederickCounty; currently a sixth-grader at the McDonogh School in Randallstown, Baltimore CountyFamily: Mother: Patricia M. Jacobs, 41, homemaker; father: Van L. Jacobs Sr.,...
NEWS
By Nora Koch and Nora Koch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 4, 1997
Quick, answer this question: The Kariba [kuh REE buh] Dam is a hydroelectric power facility on what river that forms the boundary between Zambia and Zimbabwe?Need some help? Ask Matthew Coyle, Brad Dyjak, Josef Hess and Wes Shockley, all Carroll County students who are competing in the state final of the National Geography Bee at 1: 30 p.m. today at the Naval Academy in Annapolis.The answer, by the way, is the Zambezi River.The Carroll students face equally challenging questions at the state competition.
NEWS
February 9, 1993
Pupils compete in contest on geographyCan you name the cultural region that includes Denmark, Norway and Sweden; the mountain range that is on the northern border of India; or the capital of the Philippines?That's a sample of the questions that 10 finalists faced in the FTC annual National Geographic Bee at Eldersburg Elementary School.Each contestant was asked 10 questions covering geographic areas throughout the world. Those competing in this year's bee were Russell Sharp, Keir Lauritzen, Beau Brooks, Julianna Sapp, Jay Lanigan, Jeff Crowe, Tim Feeser, Geoff Nordling, Steve Behan and Michael Markovic.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | December 3, 2006
Irish Christmas If the idea of an Irish Christmas sounds like good craic to ye (a good time to you), then consider a visit to the National Geographic Society in Washington on Thursday or Friday. The society presents the lively concert An Irish Christmas in America, featuring the traditional Irish folk band Teada. Lead vocalist Cathie Ryan, Irish harpist Grainne Hambly, uilleann pipes player Tommy Martin and other artists perform rousing Irish holiday tunes and share stories on the history and traditions of an Irish Christmas.
TRAVEL
June 19, 2005
APPALACHIAN WELCOME 13-state region invites tourists with a new map The Appalachian Regional Commission has helped states throughout the mountainous region build roads and other infrastructure, and provide high-speed access to the Internet. Now the agency is turning its attention to another economic development tool: tourism. The commission has partnered with the National Geographic Society to develop a "geotourism" map promoting an eclectic mix of more than 350 attractions reflecting the diversity of the 13-state region.
NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 24, 2003
Question: Which city is located on one of the Great Lakes -- St. Louis or Milwaukee? Answer: Milwaukee. Too easy? Try this one: Coffee and tea are major crops grown in what part of the world? Answer: Nairobi, Kenya. Do you think you're ready for Jeopardy!? Daniel Lambright, 13, might be. He is the new geography champion at Dasher Green-Owen Brown School in Columbia. On Dec. 17, the eighth-grader bested 15 children in grades four through eight during a competition at the school sponsored by the National Geographic Society.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 19, 2001
MEGAN SANDS HAS always wanted to be a teacher. To get a head start in that field, the Francis Scott Key High School senior started tutoring Northwest Middle School pupils in fall 1997. She recently reached more than 500 hours of service in tutoring. This is quite a feat considering she maintains a 4.0 grade point average, is active in student government and plays field hockey and varsity tennis. She also works at Harry's Main Street Grille in Westminster. Megan also serves as a facilitator and tutor for the Maryland Army National Guard's About Face program, which helps students with academic work, social skills and offers organized recreation, said Lt. Col. Bob Danmyer, program director.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
James Binko has spent his last 13 summers creating what he calls "geo-evangelists" -- teachers convinced of the importance of teaching geography who spread the word among their colleagues across the country.He has been so successful that his name is now a verb. "All across the country, teachers say, `Have you been Binkoed?' " says Joseph Ferguson, the assistant director of the National Geographic Society's geographic education division. He estimates that, directly or indirectly, about 18,000 teachers have been Binkoed.
TOPIC
By Shelley Emling | May 23, 1999
MIAMI -- The explorers battled fat leeches and cliffs so steep and slippery, one false step could mean a plunge of thousands of feet.They navigated a raging, treacherous river. They even heard rumors of the Dugmas, a cult of females who load their fingernails with snake venom for attacks on outsiders.It sounds like an Indiana Jones-style adventure, but it was real.The expedition, sponsored by the National Geographic Society and conducted in November, took four Americans into the inner gorge of the Zangbo River, the world's deepest canyon, in a remote part of Tibet.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.