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By Evie Rapport and Evie Rapport,KANSAS CITY STAR | July 28, 1996
You get off the coach from London in Canterbury's modest little bus station, trot down Gravel Walk past a parking lot and come face to face with the Marlowe Arcade.The Marlowe Arcade? As in Christopher Marlowe? This is appalling. A shopping center named for the playwright murdered 400 years ago? Shopping bags bearing the name of the pyrotechnic creator of "Dr. Faustus" and "The Jew of Malta"?If they've done that to Marlowe -- who was only born here in 1564 -- what have they done to Geoffrey Chaucer, the 14th-century poet who immortalized the town in "The Canterbury Tales"?
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NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | March 30, 2008
Fran Durako, a bibliophile and a former chief information officer at a large Washington law firm, owns one of the oldest and largest used-book stores in the city. The Silver Spring resident purchased the Kelmscott Bookshop at 34 West 25th St. in 2003 when its founders, Terry and Don Johanson, decided to get out of the business. The store's 25,000 books range in price from $5 to several thousand dollars. "The Works of Chaucer" / by Geoffrey Chaucer / Kelmscott Press / 554 pages It has beautiful wood engraving and very nice illustrations.
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NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 9, 2005
Three directors, two dozen actors and three musicians will bring 19 of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales to life when the Royal Shakespeare Company performs Mike Poulton's two-part adaptation of the late-14th century stories at Washington's Kennedy Center, April 15-May 7. The use of three directors - RSC associate director Gregory Doran along with Jonathan Mumby and Rebecca Gatwood - is intended to reflect the numerous voices in the Tales, a...
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 9, 2005
Three directors, two dozen actors and three musicians will bring 19 of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales to life when the Royal Shakespeare Company performs Mike Poulton's two-part adaptation of the late-14th century stories at Washington's Kennedy Center, April 15-May 7. The use of three directors - RSC associate director Gregory Doran along with Jonathan Mumby and Rebecca Gatwood - is intended to reflect the numerous voices in the Tales, a...
NEWS
By Catherine Sudue | March 30, 2008
Fran Durako, a bibliophile and a former chief information officer at a large Washington law firm, owns one of the oldest and largest used-book stores in the city. The Silver Spring resident purchased the Kelmscott Bookshop at 34 West 25th St. in 2003 when its founders, Terry and Don Johanson, decided to get out of the business. The store's 25,000 books range in price from $5 to several thousand dollars. "The Works of Chaucer" / by Geoffrey Chaucer / Kelmscott Press / 554 pages It has beautiful wood engraving and very nice illustrations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 14, 2004
I have been moving books between one house and another, doing a quinquennial cull to donate to libraries. In flux, I can't make a firm census of the poetry books I cannot bear to do without, but there are no less than 60. A good number go back to childhood and undergraduate days. Many are anthologies. There's a 1953 printing of the 1939 edition of the Oxford Book of English Verse. The one I have owned longest is Rainbow in the Sky, collected and edited by Louis Untermeyer in 1935, 484 pages of poems chosen for young people.
NEWS
By Keith Paul and Keith Paul,Staff writer | November 6, 1991
A young girl stuck in the middle of two cultures and trying to find the answers of her identity is the theme of the surrealistic play, "The Owl Answers," now playing at the Slayton House.Adrienne Kennedy's avant-garde play is not for the closed-minded or those looking for a "sing-me-a-song or tell-me-a-story" type of play, director Kwame Bey warns."It's not for the timid of mind," he said. "Those who don't have their minds open are in for a shock. . . . It's a strong piece."The story revolves around the girl, simply known as She, and takes place in a dream-type atmosphere, with settings in the New York subway, a Harlem bedroom and the Tower of London.
FEATURES
By Scott Ponemone | June 2, 1991
There's such a contradiction between the topic of this column and the process of writing it that I can't ignore it. The subject is fine illustrated books, while the process involves typing at a computer terminal.These books, much prized by collectors, possess a tactile richness of high-quality paper and a visual richness of elegant fonts and, in many cases, original artwork. They invite a leisurely perusal.The computer screen, in comparison, is an aesthetic non-starter. Thank goodness, the brightness dial can be turned to minimum and the contrast dial can be shut halfway.
NEWS
May 19, 1996
"Flatlander" by Larry Niven. It's an interesting Sci-fi book - mystery stories set in a futuristic world. And "River of the Dancing Gods" by Jack L. Chalker is light humor with some really funny jokes. The whole series is great, I really like this author a lot...For school I have to read "Canterbury Tales," by Geoffrey Chaucer. It's kind of dry, some of the stories are gross and some unfinished, but all are funny. And "A Raisin in the Sun" by Lorraine Hansbury is really funny and realistic.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
Rodney Whitaker, 74, a writer best known by one of his many pen names, Trevanian, who was the only writer of airport paperbacks to be compared to Emile Zola, Ian Fleming, Edgar Allan Poe and Geoffrey Chaucer, died Wednesday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the West Country of England. Trevanian's international bestsellers, mainly thrillers, include The Eiger Sanction (1972), which was made into a film starring Clint Eastwood; Shibumi (1979); and The Loo Sanction (1973). His 10 known published books sold more than 5 million copies and were translated into at least 14 languages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 14, 2004
I have been moving books between one house and another, doing a quinquennial cull to donate to libraries. In flux, I can't make a firm census of the poetry books I cannot bear to do without, but there are no less than 60. A good number go back to childhood and undergraduate days. Many are anthologies. There's a 1953 printing of the 1939 edition of the Oxford Book of English Verse. The one I have owned longest is Rainbow in the Sky, collected and edited by Louis Untermeyer in 1935, 484 pages of poems chosen for young people.
FEATURES
By Evie Rapport and Evie Rapport,KANSAS CITY STAR | July 28, 1996
You get off the coach from London in Canterbury's modest little bus station, trot down Gravel Walk past a parking lot and come face to face with the Marlowe Arcade.The Marlowe Arcade? As in Christopher Marlowe? This is appalling. A shopping center named for the playwright murdered 400 years ago? Shopping bags bearing the name of the pyrotechnic creator of "Dr. Faustus" and "The Jew of Malta"?If they've done that to Marlowe -- who was only born here in 1564 -- what have they done to Geoffrey Chaucer, the 14th-century poet who immortalized the town in "The Canterbury Tales"?
NEWS
By Keith Paul and Keith Paul,Staff writer | November 6, 1991
A young girl stuck in the middle of two cultures and trying to find the answers of her identity is the theme of the surrealistic play, "The Owl Answers," now playing at the Slayton House.Adrienne Kennedy's avant-garde play is not for the closed-minded or those looking for a "sing-me-a-song or tell-me-a-story" type of play, director Kwame Bey warns."It's not for the timid of mind," he said. "Those who don't have their minds open are in for a shock. . . . It's a strong piece."The story revolves around the girl, simply known as She, and takes place in a dream-type atmosphere, with settings in the New York subway, a Harlem bedroom and the Tower of London.
FEATURES
By Scott Ponemone | June 2, 1991
There's such a contradiction between the topic of this column and the process of writing it that I can't ignore it. The subject is fine illustrated books, while the process involves typing at a computer terminal.These books, much prized by collectors, possess a tactile richness of high-quality paper and a visual richness of elegant fonts and, in many cases, original artwork. They invite a leisurely perusal.The computer screen, in comparison, is an aesthetic non-starter. Thank goodness, the brightness dial can be turned to minimum and the contrast dial can be shut halfway.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2012
This is part of a series of 2012 Maryland football commitment Q&As leading up to Signing Day on Feb. 1. All answers are provided by the featured player. Name : Abner Logan Jr. Birthdate : July 24, 1993 Birthplace : Cambridge, Mass. Hometown : Cambridge, Mass. Height : 6-1 Weight : 220 Position : Linebacker High School : Dexter School in Brookline, Mass. Senior statistics : 43 tackles, 10 sacks, nine tackles for loss and two interceptions, including one returned for a touchdown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BRANDT | April 13, 2006
THEATER MORALITY WITH WIT At the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on Saturday, the Royal Shakespeare Company will debut the first part of its two-part production of The Canterbury Tales. In this new adaptation of Geoffrey Chaucer's classic, a series of colorful characters tell spirited, bawdy tales that provide serious moral lessons as well as wit and humor. Co-directors Rebecca Gatward and Jonathan Munby will present the stories in different styles to reflect the variety of narrative voices presented in the original.
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