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By Elaine Louie and Elaine Louie,N.Y. Times News Service | October 9, 1991
In a year or two, devotees of the fashion designer Geoffrey Beene will not only be able to dress in clothes designed by Beene, but also eat off Beene china, light candles in Beene candlesticks and store their tchotchkes in Beene boxes.Last week, the designer signed a three-year contract with Swid Powell, a Manhattan manufacturer of tableware and gift accessories, to design products for the home."He will probably begin with tableware," said Nan Swid, president of Swid Powell, "and then go into picture frames or boxes."
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Hazel Croner, a prolific fashion illustrator who sketched for Baltimore's department stores and their national magazine ads, died of lung disease Oct. 27 at Northwest Hospital Center. The Owings Mills resident was 98. In her 70-year career, she was a fashion illustrator for Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Town & Country and Glamour and was a courtroom artist and on-the-spot summertime boardwalk painter at Rehoboth Beach, Del., and Atlantic City, N.J. Her department store artwork for the old Schleisner's and Hutzler's appeared in the society sections of Sunday papers and in theater programs for decades.
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
Geoffrey Beene, one of fashion's most influential and imitated designers, died yesterday at his home in New York of complications of pneumonia. He was 77. Called the "dean of American design," and the "architect of American fashion," Beene's signature was his talent in draping the female body, creating simple yet exquisitely cut clothes that became timeless classics. Beene's clothes "were architecturally consistent," said Stan Herman, president of the Council of Fashion Designers of America.
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By Celia Wren and Celia Wren,NEWSDAY | October 3, 2004
NEW YORK - It's 11:30 a.m. on a sunny Thursday, and Amy Fine Collins, special correspondent for Vanity Fair, is nestled in a Bentley Continental GT that's cruising along Park Avenue at a leisurely pace. This situation is an anomaly, and it's not just that the longtime New Yorker usually lives in the fast lane, lunching at Le Cirque, penning articles about Coco Chanel and Luchino Visconti and zipping off to California for the Vanity Fair Oscar party. No, what's remarkable is that Collins is ensconced in the Bentley's back seat - even though she has recently surmounted a lifelong driving phobia, as chronicled in her new book, The God of Driving (Simon & Schuster, $24)
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Fashion Editor | January 3, 1999
Dressing up with L.L. BeanL.L. Bean, the Maine catalog company best known for rugged basics, has branched out. This month, it's introducing Freeport Studio, a line of clothes and accessories for women who eventually have to change out of their hiking shorts and T-shirts.The collection, which includes sandwashed silk dresses, drawstring pants and raffia totes, marks the first new brand in the company's 86-year history.``This is something our customer has been asking for ... garments that fit the Monday-through-Friday part of their lives,'' says Fran Philip, senior vice president of Freeport Studio.
FEATURES
By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1991
NEW YORK - It used to be that designers knocked off only the dead. Fashion's late super stars Madeleine Vionet, Cristobal Balenciaga and Norman Norell are still prime targets today.But apparently the etiquette is changing. Now, some of the best-known names in New York fashion people who ought to know better are imitating each other.For their fall 1991 collections, Donna Karan thought of Geoffrey Beene, Louis dell'Olio looked to Christian Lacroix and newcomer Zang Toi did his impressions of Karl Lagerfeld suits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Celia Wren and Celia Wren,NEWSDAY | October 3, 2004
NEW YORK - It's 11:30 a.m. on a sunny Thursday, and Amy Fine Collins, special correspondent for Vanity Fair, is nestled in a Bentley Continental GT that's cruising along Park Avenue at a leisurely pace. This situation is an anomaly, and it's not just that the longtime New Yorker usually lives in the fast lane, lunching at Le Cirque, penning articles about Coco Chanel and Luchino Visconti and zipping off to California for the Vanity Fair Oscar party. No, what's remarkable is that Collins is ensconced in the Bentley's back seat - even though she has recently surmounted a lifelong driving phobia, as chronicled in her new book, The God of Driving (Simon & Schuster, $24)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
Hazel Croner, a prolific fashion illustrator who sketched for Baltimore's department stores and their national magazine ads, died of lung disease Oct. 27 at Northwest Hospital Center. The Owings Mills resident was 98. In her 70-year career, she was a fashion illustrator for Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Town & Country and Glamour and was a courtroom artist and on-the-spot summertime boardwalk painter at Rehoboth Beach, Del., and Atlantic City, N.J. Her department store artwork for the old Schleisner's and Hutzler's appeared in the society sections of Sunday papers and in theater programs for decades.
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By Marylou Luther and Marylou Luther,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 1999
We asked 20 famous designers to name the single most important fashion influence of the century. Here's what they said:Tommy Hilfiger: RockTodd Oldham: MuicHan Feng: MinisRalph Lauren: FilmGeoffrey Beene: HollywoodChristian Francis Roth: ElectricityBetsey Johnson: MTVNicole Miller: LycraCarolina Herrera: USAJohn Bartlett: DiversityMark Badgley and James Mischka (Badgley Mischka): GlamourOscar de la Renta: T-shirtsjeans Chanelinthe'20sDiane Von Furstenberg: FreedomGene Meyer: ManhattanIsaac Mizrahi: UndressDonna Karan: JeansTom Ford (Gucci)
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service P | January 9, 1992
There has always been something alluring about what is half revealed. Evening clothes with bits of veiling here and there are perennial fashion favorites.Designers know that a daringly deep decolletage, for instance, doesn't seem nearly as extreme when the plunge is filled in with a wisp of chiffon. It makes it seem more discreet, although it isn't really.And many women of a certain age have learned to appreciate the charm of a gown with shoulders, sleeves, even a back, of sheer net or chiffon.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
Geoffrey Beene, one of fashion's most influential and imitated designers, died yesterday at his home in New York of complications of pneumonia. He was 77. Called the "dean of American design," and the "architect of American fashion," Beene's signature was his talent in draping the female body, creating simple yet exquisitely cut clothes that became timeless classics. Beene's clothes "were architecturally consistent," said Stan Herman, president of the Council of Fashion Designers of America.
NEWS
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Fashion Editor | January 3, 1999
Dressing up with L.L. BeanL.L. Bean, the Maine catalog company best known for rugged basics, has branched out. This month, it's introducing Freeport Studio, a line of clothes and accessories for women who eventually have to change out of their hiking shorts and T-shirts.The collection, which includes sandwashed silk dresses, drawstring pants and raffia totes, marks the first new brand in the company's 86-year history.``This is something our customer has been asking for ... garments that fit the Monday-through-Friday part of their lives,'' says Fran Philip, senior vice president of Freeport Studio.
FEATURES
By Elaine Louie and Elaine Louie,N.Y. Times News Service | October 9, 1991
In a year or two, devotees of the fashion designer Geoffrey Beene will not only be able to dress in clothes designed by Beene, but also eat off Beene china, light candles in Beene candlesticks and store their tchotchkes in Beene boxes.Last week, the designer signed a three-year contract with Swid Powell, a Manhattan manufacturer of tableware and gift accessories, to design products for the home."He will probably begin with tableware," said Nan Swid, president of Swid Powell, "and then go into picture frames or boxes."
FEATURES
By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1991
NEW YORK - It used to be that designers knocked off only the dead. Fashion's late super stars Madeleine Vionet, Cristobal Balenciaga and Norman Norell are still prime targets today.But apparently the etiquette is changing. Now, some of the best-known names in New York fashion people who ought to know better are imitating each other.For their fall 1991 collections, Donna Karan thought of Geoffrey Beene, Louis dell'Olio looked to Christian Lacroix and newcomer Zang Toi did his impressions of Karl Lagerfeld suits.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 8, 1992
There has always been something alluring about what is half revealed. Evening clothes with bits of veiling here and there are perennial fashion favorites.Designers know that a daringly deep decolletage, for instance, doesn't seem nearly as extreme when the plunge is filled in with a wisp of chiffon. It makes it seem more discreet, although it isn't really.And many women of a certain age have learned to appreciate the charm of a gown with shoulders, sleeves, even a back, of sheer net or chiffon.
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