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NEWS
January 12, 2004
On January 4, 2004 LUTHER GENUS devoted husband of Linda Genus. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Tuesday after 8:30 A.M. where the family will receive friends on Wednesday at 11:30 A.M. followed by funeral services at 12 noon. See: www.marchfh.com.
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NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN | May 12, 2006
Close inspection of a previously unknown, arboreal African monkey, discovered by scientists last year, shows that it's an entirely new and different type of animal than experts initially thought they had found. Rungwecebus kipunji is the new name for a monkey with grayish brown fur, a mainly curled-up tail, a crown of erect hair and a honk-like bark. The shy mountain-dwelling creature was first described by researchers last May based only on photographs of one seen in Tanzania. Because of the monkey's appearance, they knew they had a new species, and initially classified it in the established genus Lophocebus because of its similarity to a type of monkey known as a mangabey.
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NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 30, 2001
WASHINGTON -- An astonishing number of previously unknown relatives are turning up in the human family scrapbook, as archeologists dig up the remains of long-lost great-great-uncles and aunts who once shared our planet. The fossils of three more ancient ancestors were reported this year. Scientists have now identified at least 17 prehuman species that once walked the Earth -- sometimes two or three of them at the same time. The skulls and bones of more than 5,000 archaic individuals have been found, some dating more than 5 million years, according to Rick Potts, director of the Human Origins Program at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.
NEWS
January 12, 2004
On January 4, 2004 LUTHER GENUS devoted husband of Linda Genus. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue, on Tuesday after 8:30 A.M. where the family will receive friends on Wednesday at 11:30 A.M. followed by funeral services at 12 noon. See: www.marchfh.com.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | April 13, 1991
DipladeniaBotanical name: MandevillaPronunciation: dip-la-Dee-niaFamily: Apocynaceae (Dogbane)Common name: noneOrigin: BrazilClass: VineDisplay period: Year-roundHeight: 5-6 feetEnvironment: SunA plant with a dual identity, Mandevilla/Dipladenia is aeye-popper no matter what its name. Traditions die hard in the nursery industry. Despite the change about 25 years ago in the plant's genus, from Dipladenia to Mandevilla, it continues to be widely sold by its old designation.Both names, however, apply.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | May 25, 1991
Dwarf rhododendronBotanical name: Rhododendron yakushimanumPronunciation: ro-do-DEN-dronFamily: Ericaceae (heath)Common name: YakOrigin: JapanClass: ShrubDisplay period: Late May, JuneHeight: 3-4 feetEnvironment: Filtered light The Rhododendron genus, one of the largest and most varied in the plant kingdom, includes more than 800 species and in excess of 10,000 hybrids with amateurs as well as professionals engaged in the breeding. Azaleas, by the way, are actually rhododendrons, and are not, as is often thought, a genus of its own.The dwarf rhododendrons are the ones I find so appealing, having been won over by R. yakushimanum Centennial Celebration.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
He who secrets reveals And nothing conceals Somehow never tells Where grow morels - Rollo Leach, Boston mushroom aficionado SOMEWHERE IN BALTIMORE COUNTY - Don't even ask. Suffice it to say that the exact location of this story lies between the Pennsylvania line and the Syms clothing store in Towson. There's a narrow asphalt road through the woods, a stand of beech and tulip poplar. From dead leaves underfoot emerge Virginia creepers, thorny tangles of wild rose, May apples, an assortment of beer cans and bottles, and, if conditions are just so, the peculiar spongy cap of a morel mushroom.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN | May 12, 2006
Close inspection of a previously unknown, arboreal African monkey, discovered by scientists last year, shows that it's an entirely new and different type of animal than experts initially thought they had found. Rungwecebus kipunji is the new name for a monkey with grayish brown fur, a mainly curled-up tail, a crown of erect hair and a honk-like bark. The shy mountain-dwelling creature was first described by researchers last May based only on photographs of one seen in Tanzania. Because of the monkey's appearance, they knew they had a new species, and initially classified it in the established genus Lophocebus because of its similarity to a type of monkey known as a mangabey.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2001
Paleontologists in Africa have found the 3.5 million-year-old skull from what they say is an entirely new branch of the early human family tree, a discovery that threatens to overturn the prevailing view that a single line of descent stretched through the early stages of human ancestry. The discoverers and other scientists of human evolution say they are not necessarily surprised by the findings, but certainly confused. Now it seems the fossil species Australopithecus afarensis, which lived from about 4 million to 3 million years ago and is best known from the celebrated Lucy skeleton, was not alone on the African plain.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
Gardening, like any hobby or profession, has its own language. Even if you aren't a horticulturist, you'll find reading, shopping and getting advice from your next-door neighbor easier if you know the right terms.It's amazing how often the experts throw around lingo they assume you know, like "harden off" or "5-10-10 fertilizer." And before you get a chance to question them, they've moved on to "rootstock."To help demystify the jargon, we've come up with a list of important gardening terms and explained them briefly - including ones you really need to know if you live in Maryland, like "aphids."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2002
He who secrets reveals And nothing conceals Somehow never tells Where grow morels - Rollo Leach, Boston mushroom aficionado SOMEWHERE IN BALTIMORE COUNTY - Don't even ask. Suffice it to say that the exact location of this story lies between the Pennsylvania line and the Syms clothing store in Towson. There's a narrow asphalt road through the woods, a stand of beech and tulip poplar. From dead leaves underfoot emerge Virginia creepers, thorny tangles of wild rose, May apples, an assortment of beer cans and bottles, and, if conditions are just so, the peculiar spongy cap of a morel mushroom.
NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 30, 2001
WASHINGTON -- An astonishing number of previously unknown relatives are turning up in the human family scrapbook, as archeologists dig up the remains of long-lost great-great-uncles and aunts who once shared our planet. The fossils of three more ancient ancestors were reported this year. Scientists have now identified at least 17 prehuman species that once walked the Earth -- sometimes two or three of them at the same time. The skulls and bones of more than 5,000 archaic individuals have been found, some dating more than 5 million years, according to Rick Potts, director of the Human Origins Program at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 22, 2001
Paleontologists in Africa have found the 3.5 million-year-old skull from what they say is an entirely new branch of the early human family tree, a discovery that threatens to overturn the prevailing view that a single line of descent stretched through the early stages of human ancestry. The discoverers and other scientists of human evolution say they are not necessarily surprised by the findings, but certainly confused. Now it seems the fossil species Australopithecus afarensis, which lived from about 4 million to 3 million years ago and is best known from the celebrated Lucy skeleton, was not alone on the African plain.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
Gardening, like any hobby or profession, has its own language. Even if you aren't a horticulturist, you'll find reading, shopping and getting advice from your next-door neighbor easier if you know the right terms.It's amazing how often the experts throw around lingo they assume you know, like "harden off" or "5-10-10 fertilizer." And before you get a chance to question them, they've moved on to "rootstock."To help demystify the jargon, we've come up with a list of important gardening terms and explained them briefly - including ones you really need to know if you live in Maryland, like "aphids."
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | May 25, 1991
Dwarf rhododendronBotanical name: Rhododendron yakushimanumPronunciation: ro-do-DEN-dronFamily: Ericaceae (heath)Common name: YakOrigin: JapanClass: ShrubDisplay period: Late May, JuneHeight: 3-4 feetEnvironment: Filtered light The Rhododendron genus, one of the largest and most varied in the plant kingdom, includes more than 800 species and in excess of 10,000 hybrids with amateurs as well as professionals engaged in the breeding. Azaleas, by the way, are actually rhododendrons, and are not, as is often thought, a genus of its own.The dwarf rhododendrons are the ones I find so appealing, having been won over by R. yakushimanum Centennial Celebration.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | April 13, 1991
DipladeniaBotanical name: MandevillaPronunciation: dip-la-Dee-niaFamily: Apocynaceae (Dogbane)Common name: noneOrigin: BrazilClass: VineDisplay period: Year-roundHeight: 5-6 feetEnvironment: SunA plant with a dual identity, Mandevilla/Dipladenia is aeye-popper no matter what its name. Traditions die hard in the nursery industry. Despite the change about 25 years ago in the plant's genus, from Dipladenia to Mandevilla, it continues to be widely sold by its old designation.Both names, however, apply.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | August 26, 1996
You can see fall coming as surely as you can see a candle flame snuffed by the wind. At twilight, watch any grass field or woods where this summer's fireflies, nourished by a wet spring, rose in great numbers. Now their dwindling lights tell us autumn is on the way.Think of it as the lightning bugs' parting signal in a brief life of signals.Seven days on the planet between June and mid-August, that's about all the adult lightning bug has in temperate zones. Time for the males to rise from the ground at twilight or night, fly through the darkness flashing, looking for a mate.
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,Chicago Tribune | August 24, 1994
First, let's answer this nagging question: What's the difference between a muskmelon and a cantaloupe?They're both ivory-yellow, solid and wrapped in fishnet rinds, but one's got seams, right?Wrong, or at least not exactly, says Chuck Voigt, a vegetable specialist at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. The melon without seams is what many people call a cantaloupe, but technically it's not a cantaloupe, he says. It's really a muskmelon without seams, called a western muskmelon, which is different from an eastern muskmelon with seams, which is what most people call a muskmelon.
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