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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
LAUREL -- Favored His Ginger, named after the famous dancer Ginger Rogers, stepped her way into tougher competition by winning the $50,000 added Genuine Risk Stakes at Laurel yesterday.But she had little challenge after Land Running, the second choice and local favorite, was unruly in the gate, got left behind and never was a factor. Favored His Ginger romped to a $32,715 winner's share by nearly five lengths over Starlight Surprise.Owned by Leonard Pearlstein of Philadelphia, who has 16 horses in training here, Favored His Ginger was held just off the pace by jockey Walter Guerra, who urged her to the front as they turned for home.
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By Conor O'Neill, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
While Billy Jenkins Jr.'s classmates spent the early part of summer heading to the pool, playing video games and going to summer camps, the 12-year-old from Annapolis took a little sailing trip with his father. Their destination? Bermuda. Billy served as a crew member of Genuine Risk in last month's Newport-Bermuda Race, which started in Newport, R.I., and finished at St. David's Head in Bermuda. He is one of the youngest participants to have raced in the event. Genuine Risk, a Dubois 90-foot racing yacht, won first place in the Class 16 Open Division and brought home the Royal Mail Trophy.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
Angel Cordero Jr. glanced over his shoulder and saw her coming. He recognized the filly by her face. Genuine Risk had made that face famous by becoming the second filly to win the Kentucky Derby. Ringed in white, her piercing eyes were set higher than most thoroughbreds', and a distinctive white blaze - as wide as a house painter's widest brush - streaked from the top of her forehead down her long face, spilling onto her nostrils. That flash of white is what Cordero saw 20 years ago when he took the lead with the colt Codex around the far turn in the 105th Preakness.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 1, 2010
Weyman D. Swagger, a Baltimore Sun news photographer who became the paper's first photo editor, died of cancer Wednesday at his Halethorpe home. He was 66. During his 47 years at the paper, he took thousands of photos. He was shot at while taking photos during the 1968 city riots, chronicled the 1976 visit of the Tall Ships to the harbor and photographed the 1977 inauguration of President Jimmy Carter. Colleagues admired his portrait work. Born in Beverly, W.Va., Mr. Swagger wrote of growing up on a farm where there was no electricity or telephone.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2005
UPPERVILLE, Va. - Twenty-five years after her historic run through the Triple Crown, Genuine Risk lives peacefully at Newstead Farm in northern Virginia. Once America's sweetheart, she is now racing's grand dame. Genuine Risk, 28, is the oldest living winner of the Kentucky Derby. In 1980, she became the first filly not only to run in each Triple Crown race, but to place in each race. As the first filly to win the Derby in 65 years, she finished second in both the Preakness and Belmont.
SPORTS
By Conor O'Neill, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
While Billy Jenkins Jr.'s classmates spent the early part of summer heading to the pool, playing video games and going to summer camps, the 12-year-old from Annapolis took a little sailing trip with his father. Their destination? Bermuda. Billy served as a crew member of Genuine Risk in last month's Newport-Bermuda Race, which started in Newport, R.I., and finished at St. David's Head in Bermuda. He is one of the youngest participants to have raced in the event. Genuine Risk, a Dubois 90-foot racing yacht, won first place in the Class 16 Open Division and brought home the Royal Mail Trophy.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 26, 1993
Reading Time: Two Minutes:The central theme of the new book "Ballpark: Camden Yards and the Building of an American Dream" seems to be who among a half-dozen candidates deserves most of the credit for the creation of Oriole Park?Once that is settled, perhaps the appropriate party will then step forward to accept "credit" for (1) the seats in left field that offer an excellent view of right-center, (2) the original Texas-sized dugouts that had to be scaled down, (3) those obstructed-view seats caused by railings and overhangs and (4)
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 17, 1996
He is a 53-year-old trainer bringing a horse to a Triple Crown race for the first time.He still was scrambling to find a jockey just hours before thePreakness draw Wednesday.His horse is listed as a 50-1 shot tomorrow at Pimlico.Not exactly a foreshadowing of glory.Why was he drawing big crowds of reporters yesterday at the stakes barn?Because he is Angel Cordero Jr., the Hall of Fame jockey and winner of perhaps the most infamous Preakness ever, now a struggling trainer with mud on his shoes, looking for his break.
SPORTS
By Jack Mann and Jack Mann,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1990
ELMONT, N.Y. -- "You better leave," LeRoy Jolley Jr. told a reporter. "You're making him nervous."LeRoy Jolley Sr. has never needed much stimulus to become uptight, but he has one. He is the trainer of Meadow Star, the 2-year-old filly who is the superstar of this Breeders' Cup if it has one.Meadow Star is also a light in the tunnel for perhaps thousands of single-parent families and abused children in the New York area. Owner Carl Icahn, who runs TWA among other things, has decreed that all Meadow Star's winnings go to the Children's Rescue Fund he founded.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | April 1, 2010
Weyman D. Swagger, a Baltimore Sun news photographer who became the paper's first photo editor, died of cancer Wednesday at his Halethorpe home. He was 66. During his 47 years at the paper, he took thousands of photos. He was shot at while taking photos during the 1968 city riots, chronicled the 1976 visit of the Tall Ships to the harbor and photographed the 1977 inauguration of President Jimmy Carter. Colleagues admired his portrait work. Born in Beverly, W.Va., Mr. Swagger wrote of growing up on a farm where there was no electricity or telephone.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2005
UPPERVILLE, Va. - Twenty-five years after her historic run through the Triple Crown, Genuine Risk lives peacefully at Newstead Farm in northern Virginia. Once America's sweetheart, she is now racing's grand dame. Genuine Risk, 28, is the oldest living winner of the Kentucky Derby. In 1980, she became the first filly not only to run in each Triple Crown race, but to place in each race. As the first filly to win the Derby in 65 years, she finished second in both the Preakness and Belmont.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2000
Angel Cordero Jr. glanced over his shoulder and saw her coming. He recognized the filly by her face. Genuine Risk had made that face famous by becoming the second filly to win the Kentucky Derby. Ringed in white, her piercing eyes were set higher than most thoroughbreds', and a distinctive white blaze - as wide as a house painter's widest brush - streaked from the top of her forehead down her long face, spilling onto her nostrils. That flash of white is what Cordero saw 20 years ago when he took the lead with the colt Codex around the far turn in the 105th Preakness.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
All they could say was: "What a ride! What a ride!"Apprentice jockey Seth Martinez calmly had steered Countess Lee out of trouble on the far turn and again down the homestretch in Friday's first race at Laurel Park. The 3-year-old filly closed with a rush for the victory."The boy's got a God-given knack," said Clinton S. Bratton, the filly's trainer.In the footsteps of Chris McCarron and Kent Desormeaux, who became stars as apprentice jockeys in Maryland, comes Martinez, who turned 17 two weeks ago. On Wednesday, he won four straight races at Laurel.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | May 17, 1996
He is a 53-year-old trainer bringing a horse to a Triple Crown race for the first time.He still was scrambling to find a jockey just hours before thePreakness draw Wednesday.His horse is listed as a 50-1 shot tomorrow at Pimlico.Not exactly a foreshadowing of glory.Why was he drawing big crowds of reporters yesterday at the stakes barn?Because he is Angel Cordero Jr., the Hall of Fame jockey and winner of perhaps the most infamous Preakness ever, now a struggling trainer with mud on his shoes, looking for his break.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
Head down, ears up, eyes closed, the pregnant broodmare dozes in the midday sun. Mary Bo Peep is asleep on her feet -- no easy task, considering the 90-pound thoroughbred stirring restlessly inside her.Mary Bo Peep doesn't budge. She has given birth many times before, and the warmth feels good on her aging back. Nothing stirs save the unborn foal, kicking at its mother's sides. Her belly dancing, the old mare slumbers on.It's spring and, like 1,500 other thoroughbred broodmares throughout Maryland, Mary Bo Peep awaits the stork.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 26, 1993
Reading Time: Two Minutes:The central theme of the new book "Ballpark: Camden Yards and the Building of an American Dream" seems to be who among a half-dozen candidates deserves most of the credit for the creation of Oriole Park?Once that is settled, perhaps the appropriate party will then step forward to accept "credit" for (1) the seats in left field that offer an excellent view of right-center, (2) the original Texas-sized dugouts that had to be scaled down, (3) those obstructed-view seats caused by railings and overhangs and (4)
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
All they could say was: "What a ride! What a ride!"Apprentice jockey Seth Martinez calmly had steered Countess Lee out of trouble on the far turn and again down the homestretch in Friday's first race at Laurel Park. The 3-year-old filly closed with a rush for the victory."The boy's got a God-given knack," said Clinton S. Bratton, the filly's trainer.In the footsteps of Chris McCarron and Kent Desormeaux, who became stars as apprentice jockeys in Maryland, comes Martinez, who turned 17 two weeks ago. On Wednesday, he won four straight races at Laurel.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
Head down, ears up, eyes closed, the pregnant broodmare dozes in the midday sun. Mary Bo Peep is asleep on her feet -- no easy task, considering the 90-pound thoroughbred stirring restlessly inside her.Mary Bo Peep doesn't budge. She has given birth many times before, and the warmth feels good on her aging back. Nothing stirs save the unborn foal, kicking at its mother's sides. Her belly dancing, the old mare slumbers on.It's spring and, like 1,500 other thoroughbred broodmares throughout Maryland, Mary Bo Peep awaits the stork.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
LAUREL -- Favored His Ginger, named after the famous dancer Ginger Rogers, stepped her way into tougher competition by winning the $50,000 added Genuine Risk Stakes at Laurel yesterday.But she had little challenge after Land Running, the second choice and local favorite, was unruly in the gate, got left behind and never was a factor. Favored His Ginger romped to a $32,715 winner's share by nearly five lengths over Starlight Surprise.Owned by Leonard Pearlstein of Philadelphia, who has 16 horses in training here, Favored His Ginger was held just off the pace by jockey Walter Guerra, who urged her to the front as they turned for home.
SPORTS
By Jack Mann and Jack Mann,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1990
ELMONT, N.Y. -- "You better leave," LeRoy Jolley Jr. told a reporter. "You're making him nervous."LeRoy Jolley Sr. has never needed much stimulus to become uptight, but he has one. He is the trainer of Meadow Star, the 2-year-old filly who is the superstar of this Breeders' Cup if it has one.Meadow Star is also a light in the tunnel for perhaps thousands of single-parent families and abused children in the New York area. Owner Carl Icahn, who runs TWA among other things, has decreed that all Meadow Star's winnings go to the Children's Rescue Fund he founded.
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