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By Ruth Wooden and Andrew L. Yarrow | December 21, 2009
T homas Jefferson called them the "wisest invention ever devised by the wit of man for the perfect exercise of self-government." Hardly faint praise from one of the fathers of American democracy. So, what was he talking about? The town hall meeting. Fast forward 200 years to Dartmouth, Mass., where a "town hall" on health care reform finds a woman calling President Barack Obama's position "Nazi policy." Amusingly, aptly, but not very cordially, Rep. Barney Frank responds: "On what planet do you spend most of your time?"
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NEWS
May 19, 2014
One of the marvels of the Internet to date is that it's largely been a level playing field where there is equal access to all (at least those not blocked by oppressive governments), an arrangement that has not only encouraged innovation and investment but greatly benefited ordinary consumers. U.S. officials keep claiming to support so-called "net neutrality," but interpretations of what that means seem to vary widely. At least that explains how last week the Federal Communications Commission could issue rules that reportedly uphold net neutrality but also raise the possibility of pay-for-preference treatment.
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NEWS
By Andrew Ratner | December 4, 1996
MY FIRST NIGHT'S work for a newspaper, I was sent to interview Tiny Tim.He was the headliner for a Police Benevolent Association fund-raiser. I sat for about 15 minutes with him on folding chairs backstage at a high school auditorium in eastern Pennsylvania.It was not the saddest 15 minutes I've spent in journalism, though it may have been the most pitiful."Sixty-eight," he sighed, repeating like some mantra that year I had just asked him about. "Sometimes, I still think it's 1968. It's so strange.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
"Looking," HBO's newest half-hour comedy, is a show about gay men, but that doesn't make it a gay show. Which is not to say the series (which premieres Sunday at 10:30 p.m.) doesn't have gay sexuality at its center. Its central characters are three out men living in San Francisco, the long-reigning epicenter of LGBT culture. And these guys - - video-game designer Patrick, artist's assistant Augustin and longtime waiter Dom - - are hardly shy about their sexual desires. The show's opening moments depict what may be TV's most stunningly awkward "helping hand.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | January 29, 1997
There are, in my view, very few genuine sports heroes. My favorites are the ones who are noteworthy not for the sports they played, but for what they did outside the athletic arena.One of these is Muhammad Ali, pugilist par excellence who defied federal authorities in their attempt to draft him into the Army so he could - at least tacitly - support an unjust and unpopular war in Vietnam. When he refused induction into the Army in April of 1967, Ali made the leap from superb boxer to folk hero.
NEWS
August 12, 2009
Videos depicting members of Congress being shouted down at town hall meetings by health care reform opponents are making the rounds on the Internet and the TV news. Are these protests genuine or are they orchestrated by Republicans and the insurance industry? Genuine 53% Artificial 44% Not sure 3% (1,679 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Recent data show that Baltimore-area home sales increased 10 percent in July compared to 2008, though sale prices dropped about 7 percent.
FEATURES
October 12, 2007
Michael Sragow rates In the Wild an A, calling it "a genuine odyssey" that "achieves the extraordinary with ecstatic epiphanies." What's your take on director Sean Penn's adaptation of Jon Krakauer's book of self-discovery in the wilderness? Join the discussion this weekend at baltimoresun.com/criticalmass.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2009
It was early on a weekday morning, and I was in the lobby of a local restaurant, waiting for my friend to meet me for breakfast. I was sitting on a bench next to a businessman who was very nice - we'll call him Mr. Genuine - when an associate of his arrived. Mr. Genuine rose and engaged in the typical handshake greeting with the other guy, followed by the usual pleasantries. He even introduced me, saying we had just met while waiting but were in the same line of business: communications.
NEWS
March 23, 1993
American attention is suddenly focused like a laser not on squabbles over the domestic economy, which in context seem almost parochial, but on a genuine constitutional crisis in Russia that threatens to increase world instability.President Boris N. Yeltsin's fight to retain power or, as he would put it, to preserve democracy is a struggle that far transcends the boundaries of his huge country. It is a political battle with global implications for nuclear arms control or proliferation, for free markets or command economies, for national cohesion or further unraveling into the ethnic-religious-ideological rivalries that have erupted with the end of the Cold War.In this struggle, U.S. self-interest clearly lies in measured support for Mr. Yeltsin.
NEWS
February 13, 1991
An apology from a powerful politician is front-page news -- especially from a politician like William Donald Schaefer who has a legendary capacity to carry a grudge. So, like the rest of the state, we welcome news of Governor Schaefer's surprise appearance in the House of Delegates Monday evening. We hope his brief speech will bring a merciful end to one of the legislative season's zanier distractions.For almost two weeks, the governor's off-the-cuff insult to the Eastern Shore has been engendering resentment in Eastern Shore lawmakers and their constituents.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
Less than a week before state officials are expected to award a casino license in Prince George's County, one of the three bidders is calling the state's research "flat-out wrong. " Greenwood Racing, which wants to build a Parx casino on Route 210 in Fort Washington, has asked the state's special site selection committee to delay a decision currently scheduled for Friday. The company wants more time to challenge findings that a rival bid would be more lucrative for the state. Two weeks ago, consultants to the state concluded that a proposal from MGM Resorts International to build a casino at National Harbor would bring in more revenue than Greenwood's proposal or that of Penn National Gaming, which wants to build a Hollywood casino at nearby Rosecroft Raceway.
NEWS
By Joel Brinkley | September 26, 2013
Washington is preoccupied with two all-consuming debates right now. First, of course, is Syria. President Barack Obama placed his faith in two wholly untrustworthy figures. Syrian President Bashar Assad has shown himself to be a consummate liar, and Russian President Vladimir Putin's overarching goals on Syria are to protect Mr. Assad and show up the United States. Meantime, Democrats and Republicans are locked in ever more hostile arguments over the price that right-wing zealots are trying to exact to pass the annual budget and extend the debt ceiling.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Heading to a crab house for a feast is fun, but nothing beats an afternoon of crabs in the backyard. Here are some tips for planning a feast of your own: Dress the part: Crab feasts are a dirty business; expect to get messy. Jen Harris, an upstate New York native who moved to Baltimore in 2010, learned this the hard way at her first crab feast. "Do not wear a dry clean-only blouse with white jeans," she warns. "Wear clothing you don't care about. " Set the table: Long, outdoor tables are ideal for crab feasting, but any table covered in newspaper or brown paper will do. Set mallets, knives and rolls of paper towels within easy grabbing distance of pickers (experienced pickers will appreciate bowls of water for hand-rinsing, too)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
Hey lady, want a cow? Sure, who wouldn't want a cow, or a pig for that matter, but, gee, it's not like I have a meat freezer. The idea of one's own personal livestock, grown by a responsible farmer, is appealing. But there are typically two deal-killers -- the expense and the required freezer space, even a side of beef, half the cow, yields somewhere in the neighborhood of 250 pounds. Meat clubs, or meat shares, are a way of letting consumers cut their commitment to a whole-animal purchase.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2011
A Baltimore judge summoned attorneys from a large foreclosure law firm Monday to explain whether signatures on key documents were genuine, part of the fallout from revelations last year that foreclosures nationwide were being processed based on deficient — or fraudulent — paperwork. Virginia-based Shapiro & Burson was the third law firm called this year before Baltimore Circuit Judge W. Michel Pierson. He has heard admissions from several attorneys — at Shapiro & Burson and elsewhere — that their signatures on affidavits required to foreclose on homeowners were sometimes made by other people.
SPORTS
By Conor O'Neill, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
While Billy Jenkins Jr.'s classmates spent the early part of summer heading to the pool, playing video games and going to summer camps, the 12-year-old from Annapolis took a little sailing trip with his father. Their destination? Bermuda. Billy served as a crew member of Genuine Risk in last month's Newport-Bermuda Race, which started in Newport, R.I., and finished at St. David's Head in Bermuda. He is one of the youngest participants to have raced in the event. Genuine Risk, a Dubois 90-foot racing yacht, won first place in the Class 16 Open Division and brought home the Royal Mail Trophy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence analysts said yesterday that they had concluded that the voice on an audiotape that emerged last week is Osama bin Laden's, and that the tape was made quite recently. The authentication of the tape, while not unexpected, is significant in that it represents an official determination after almost a year of doubt that the terrorist leader is still alive. The conclusion follows days of intensive analysis of the tape by experts at the CIA and the National Security Agency.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | May 18, 2010
I was the only reporter who snuck into the Senate Spouses dinner in Washington last week, and nobody swore me to secrecy, so here goes ... Tuesday, May 11, in the lofty, leafy glass arcade of the U.S. Botanic Garden near the Capitol, tea partier Scott Brown hobnobbed with prairie progressive Tom Harkin, affable Chuck Schumer put an arm around flinty Chuck Grassley, and cranky old Jim Bunning went around saying hi, even to Democrats. The Udalls were there, Mark of Colorado, Tom of New Mexico, looking like Eagle Scouts, as Udalls do. Here were obstructionist Republicans, smiling and gracious as small-town morticians, and their socialist death-panel colleagues being gracious right back: Dodd, Dorgan, Durbin.
NEWS
By Ruth Wooden and Andrew L. Yarrow | December 21, 2009
T homas Jefferson called them the "wisest invention ever devised by the wit of man for the perfect exercise of self-government." Hardly faint praise from one of the fathers of American democracy. So, what was he talking about? The town hall meeting. Fast forward 200 years to Dartmouth, Mass., where a "town hall" on health care reform finds a woman calling President Barack Obama's position "Nazi policy." Amusingly, aptly, but not very cordially, Rep. Barney Frank responds: "On what planet do you spend most of your time?"
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