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Gentrification

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NEWS
December 8, 1994
It's holiday house tour time again. Union Square will showcase 25 restored Victorian houses on the afternoon of Dec. 11; Federal Hill and Otterbein will sponsor a candlelight tour Dec. As visitors descend on historic neighborhoods, the question is often asked: Whatever happened to gentrification?It never was a panacea, but gentrification continues -- despite the continuing exodus of the middle class from Baltimore. Just look at Stirling Street, a one-block stretch near the troubled Old Town Mall.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 4, 2008
Food *** (3 stars) Service *** (3 stars) Atmosphere *** (3 stars) Some interesting things are happening in Locust Point restaurant-wise, but only the Wine Market gets much press. If you don't live in the area, it's easy to forget about Hull Street Blues, Pazza Luna, Nasu Blanca, Aloha Tokyo and, now, Luca's Cafe. Luca's is the newest of the places that are part of a general gentrification of the area. The old Truman's Bar has been gutted, and a sparkling little restaurant has opened in its place.
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NEWS
By Lynette Clemetson and Lynette Clemetson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 2002
PITTSBURGH - Most people look puzzled when Steven Radney talks about moving from a quiet town south of Pittsburgh into the Hill District, one of the poorest, most beleaguered areas of the city. When they ask gingerly what he hopes to gain from the move, Radney answers, "An experience." "When I look around here, I don't see it as it is," said Radney, a 29-year-old designer and engineer standing in front of an abandoned brick rowhouse that he hopes to renovate. "I see it as it could be, because I know what it was."
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | December 4, 2006
For Shirley Dendy, the new furnace and double-pane windows came just in time for winter - insulating her from the cold air that for years slipped through the cracks of her apartment west of Green Mount Cemetery. "I have 18 windows," said Dendy, who has lived in the subsidized apartment on Guilford Avenue for six years. "I can tell already by my BGE bill that it's doing something." But both Dendy and city officials hope the renovation of 150 subsidized housing units in the Greenmount West and Barclay neighborhoods will have implications beyond saving electricity.
NEWS
July 24, 1996
A YEAR HAS passed since the First U.S. Army ended its mission at Fort George G. Meade. The 9,000-acre base in western Anne Arundel County, which started as a World War I training camp, has begun its shift to other uses. While the process is far from complete, the increased civilianization of Fort Meade is bringing gentrification as well.Consider two recent news items: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will build a $40 million science center, housing 70 laboratories, a library and offices at Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Peter Duvall | October 2, 2002
I RECENTLY participated in a focus group of community leaders regarding problems, solutions and priorities for Baltimore's neighborhoods. I was surprised by how concerned several neighborhood leaders are with the impact of gentrification. Most Baltimoreans are aware that Federal Hill changed from a working-class neighborhood to a yuppie neighborhood more than a decade ago. Canton made similar changes in far less time. In both cases, long-term residents were hit by higher taxes and with a change in lifestyle as new residents with different tastes moved in. Certainly, many of us can sympathize with the increasingly isolated old-timers as their neighborhoods changed.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 4, 2008
Food *** (3 stars) Service *** (3 stars) Atmosphere *** (3 stars) Some interesting things are happening in Locust Point restaurant-wise, but only the Wine Market gets much press. If you don't live in the area, it's easy to forget about Hull Street Blues, Pazza Luna, Nasu Blanca, Aloha Tokyo and, now, Luca's Cafe. Luca's is the newest of the places that are part of a general gentrification of the area. The old Truman's Bar has been gutted, and a sparkling little restaurant has opened in its place.
NEWS
April 26, 1994
Pigtown -- or, as some upscale residents and real estate people prefer, Washington Village -- is a largely blue-collar area west of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Although it is within sight of Oriole Park, it has so far received few benefits from the baseball stadium. In fact, Washington Boulevard, the neighborhood's main street, has never looked as squalid and unkempt as it does today.Mercifully, change is in the air.Last year, an old elementary school at Washington Boulevard and Carey Street was transformed into senior citizen apartments, a conversion that won architectural plaudits.
NEWS
January 12, 1995
The vote was close in May 1950, when Eastport and a half-dozen other communities agreed to be annexed by Annapolis. Forty-five years later, though, Eastport retains its own character. Even though it has been gentrifying rapidly in recent years, that section of the state's capital city is still a place where millionaires live virtually next door to crabbers and car mechanics."There's a balance, symmetry and feel that we don't want to lose. And there always has been a diversity in income levels," observes Roger "Pip" Moyer, a former Annapolis mayor and an Eastport native.
BUSINESS
By Amy Bernstein and Amy Bernstein,Special to The Sun | September 17, 1995
As an urban neighborhood, Federal Hill is something of an anomaly.It's not crime-ridden. It isn't particularly dirty. Its boulevards are often quiet, even at midday. And there's not much traffic.While it has some hallmarks of city life, such as a Citizens Patrol, Federal Hill also is quaintly suburban (right down to the shady back yards), with communal pastimes including a dog-walkers group, garden club, and family play group.In June, Federal Hill took on even more of a suburban feel with the opening of a new playground on top of the hill itself.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | October 25, 2005
TYLERTON -- The fall crab run is on, and oysters are fetching record prices here on Smith Island, Maryland's only offshore fishing community. So why are watermen and their families here talking as if their world, out here on this dab of marsh 10 miles from the mainland, might be ending? We think that if we maintain the bay's water quality, and sustain its fisheries, watermen will thrive. But with waterfront property fetching insane prices from Norfolk to Havre de Grace, just maintaining space for their boats and communities along the Chesapeake's edges is becoming ever more a problem for the commercial man. "We're losing ground all the time, up and down the bay, with property getting so expensive watermen can't compete," says Larry Simns, president of the Maryland Watermen's Association.
NEWS
By KELLY BREWINGTON and KELLY BREWINGTON,SUN REPORTER | October 15, 2005
When participants gather today on the Washington Mall for the sequel to the 1995 Million Man March, they intend not only to mark the historic occasion, but to emerge with a national agenda on such issues as crime, education and health care. A decade ago, the gathering of African-American men ignited a spirit of unity among participants. But when Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan convenes the Millions More Movement, bringing people together won't be the only objective. He will push for action.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
By 10 a.m. John Barr, the de facto mayor of 36th Street, is tottering along "The Avenue," the heart of Hampden's shopping area. He walks past a Bikram yoga studio, one of the latest additions to this North Baltimore neighborhood's cluster of squat storefronts. And past the Salvation Army thrift store, where a sign blaming the neighborhood's "gentrification" for its closure screams out from a shuttered storefront. It is an odd jumble - where old-school meets hip - and a testament to the gradual transformation of a traditionally working-class and insular neighborhood experiencing an influx of newcomers and a real estate boom with no end in sight.
NEWS
By Antero Pietila and Antero Pietila,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
Mildred Ruby, 80, remembers the chickens, sheep, goats and rabbits that used to roam around her 1850s stone house in Woodberry, about three miles from Baltimore's City Hall. She also remembers the three stables that stood in her back yard. Such rusticity was ending in 1959, when a 900-foot antenna tower gave Ruby's community its other name, Television Hill. About that time, construction of the Jones Falls Expressway brought an elevated river of concrete that blocked the view of the industrialized stream valley.
NEWS
By Peter Duvall | October 2, 2002
I RECENTLY participated in a focus group of community leaders regarding problems, solutions and priorities for Baltimore's neighborhoods. I was surprised by how concerned several neighborhood leaders are with the impact of gentrification. Most Baltimoreans are aware that Federal Hill changed from a working-class neighborhood to a yuppie neighborhood more than a decade ago. Canton made similar changes in far less time. In both cases, long-term residents were hit by higher taxes and with a change in lifestyle as new residents with different tastes moved in. Certainly, many of us can sympathize with the increasingly isolated old-timers as their neighborhoods changed.
NEWS
By Yilu Zhao and Yilu Zhao,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 2002
NEW YORK - It had to happen eventually. Chinatown already spills over into two neighborhoods moving from modest to mod: Little Italy and the Lower East Side. And it is just a cell phone's throw from TriBeCa and SoHo. Gentrification was bound to come to Chinatown. Now that it has arrived, the neighborhood is experiencing the usual side effects, including landlords trying to evict longtime tenants who pay very little rent in favor of deep-pocketed bond traders. But this time there is a twist.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
In this tranquil countryside -- just seven miles east of Baltimore -- folks still like to can home-grown beets and string beans, and treasure rolling expanses of emerald fields and undisturbed woodland.A bit closer to the Chesapeake Bay, where a slow gentrification ** is transforming "shore shack" properties into expensive homes, newer residents enjoy twilight breezes on creeks like Frog Mortar and Hog Pen.The setting is misleading. Here on Baltimore County's east side, where Rochambeau's troops camped in 1781 after the victory at Yorktown, war is back in the air.White Marsh, Chase, Bowleys Quarters and other communities are battling plans for a $100 million motor speedway on a 1,100-acre tract off Eastern Boulevard near Martin State Airport.
NEWS
By Lynette Clemetson and Lynette Clemetson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 2002
PITTSBURGH - Most people look puzzled when Steven Radney talks about moving from a quiet town south of Pittsburgh into the Hill District, one of the poorest, most beleaguered areas of the city. When they ask gingerly what he hopes to gain from the move, Radney answers, "An experience." "When I look around here, I don't see it as it is," said Radney, a 29-year-old designer and engineer standing in front of an abandoned brick rowhouse that he hopes to renovate. "I see it as it could be, because I know what it was."
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2001
NEW ORLEANS - It's battered but unbowed, this old brick museum. Even besieged by clamor and dust, even as ownership squabbles threaten to kick hundreds of Civil War artifacts to the curb. No matter. "The Confederate Museum IS OPEN," defiant block letters announce. And for now, it is. War buffs, Confederate enthusiasts and every other kind of tourist pay $5 to prowl among the glass cases of Louisiana's oldest museum. They can leaf through the guest book, scrawl - as someone did this month - "Wave the flag!"
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