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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Coming unstuck in time, Pamela Regis was investigating the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime. When the clocks struck 13, she dreamt she went to ... to Manderley? — no, McDaniel. Strange as it might seem, Regis' dream of jumbled-up literary genres will come true this August. In a manner of speaking. Aided by grants totaling $200,000 from the Nora Roberts Foundation, McDaniel College in Westminster is about to launch what is possibly the nation's first academic minor in genre fiction: horror, sci-fi, romance, fantasy, mystery and Westerns, as well as graphic novels.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Plunging into a novel by James Kelman is like diving head-first into a chilly lake. It's a shock to your system at first, and a bit disorienting, but the trick is to keep moving. Once your muscles get warmed up and you get your bearings, the experience is exhilarating. Kelman, 66, is the Man Booker Award-winning author (in 1994 for "How Late It Was, How Late") whose novels champion the working-class people of his native Scotland. His novels are typically told through the point of view of one character, and from the opening sentence, the reader is thrust headlong into his narrator's thoughts and perceptions.
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NEWS
By Gary Dretzka, and Gary Dretzka,,Chicago Tribune | August 20, 1995
"Stormy Weather," by Carl Hiaasen. New York: Knopf. 352 pages. $24 Anyone who remembers the devastation caused by Hurricane Andrew also might recall that the tragedy was compounded by carloads of thieves and con artists who arrived in the storm's wake. Likewise, much of the damage to structures resulted from shortcuts taken by contractors and inspectors who allowed substandard construction on homes that were in Andrew's path.Mr. Hiaasen helped chronicle the calamity - both criminal and meteorological - for readers of the Miami Herald.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Coming unstuck in time, Pamela Regis was investigating the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime. When the clocks struck 13, she dreamt she went to ... to Manderley? — no, McDaniel. Strange as it might seem, Regis' dream of jumbled-up literary genres will come true this August. In a manner of speaking. Aided by grants totaling $200,000 from the Nora Roberts Foundation, McDaniel College in Westminster is about to launch what is possibly the nation's first academic minor in genre fiction: horror, sci-fi, romance, fantasy, mystery and Westerns, as well as graphic novels.
NEWS
By Mark Miller | June 29, 1992
DANGEROUS GAMES. By Susan Crosland. Random House. 294 pages. $20. SUSAN Crosland is the Baltimore native (daughter of Sun correspondent and editor Mark Watson) and writer who is much better known in London than she is in Baltimore or any other American city. She married twice, first to Sun correspondent Patrick Skene Catling, then to Labor Party politician Anthony Crosland, and has written for various British papers."Ruling Passions," her first novel, was a best-seller in Britain and did well here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
A February harvest of novels, some with tender young stalks and others with the toughened bark of experience: Get ready for darkness and delights, starting with David Mitchell's Number9Dream (Random House, 400 pages, $24.95), which was short-listed for the Booker Prize (or, as it's usually said, "Britain's prestigious Booker Prize"). And what a rich and lively experience it is. Set in Japan, where Mitchell (Ghostwritten) teaches, it centers on young man, Eiji Miyaki, who travels to Tokyo from his rural roots to seek out his father.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | November 21, 2004
McSweeney's Enchanted Chamber of Astonishing Stories Edited and with an introduction by Michael Chabon (Vintage, 368 pages, $13.95) The goal of this short-story anthology is to revitalize genre fiction -- crime, adventure, sci-fi, horror, and romance stories -- by coaxing new examples from the hippest possible crowd of contemporary fiction writers. It's a formula that worked well in a previous volume, the 2003 Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales, also compiled by novelist Michael Chabon and the editors of the literary magazine McSweeney's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
Plunging into a novel by James Kelman is like diving head-first into a chilly lake. It's a shock to your system at first, and a bit disorienting, but the trick is to keep moving. Once your muscles get warmed up and you get your bearings, the experience is exhilarating. Kelman, 66, is the Man Booker Award-winning author (in 1994 for "How Late It Was, How Late") whose novels champion the working-class people of his native Scotland. His novels are typically told through the point of view of one character, and from the opening sentence, the reader is thrust headlong into his narrator's thoughts and perceptions.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[ Special to The Sun] | August 26, 2007
Always By Nicola Griffith Riverhead (Penguin) / 480 pages / $26.95 The debate springs up every so often: Can writing that is also mystery, science fiction, gothic or romance still be literary and address serious issues? Or is it all just glorified beach reading? The argument has been raging anew for months, fueled by comments and commentary by the likes of such award-winning writers as Michael Chabon, Ursula K. LeGuin, Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Michael Cunningham and Stephen King.
NEWS
By Melissa Grace | August 6, 1995
"RL's Dream," by Walter Mosley. New York: W.W. Norton & Company. 267 pages. $22 Walter Mosley does not disappoint. In this, his latest novel and first venture into non-genre fiction, Mr. Mosley keeps the pace up, the pages turning, in a tale of the Mississippi blues and what made the blues the blues: black life in the deep South before the era of civil rights.And so it goes. "Robert Johnson's blues would rip the skin right off yo' back. Robert Johnson's blues get down to a nerve most people don't even have no more.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[ Special to The Sun] | August 26, 2007
Always By Nicola Griffith Riverhead (Penguin) / 480 pages / $26.95 The debate springs up every so often: Can writing that is also mystery, science fiction, gothic or romance still be literary and address serious issues? Or is it all just glorified beach reading? The argument has been raging anew for months, fueled by comments and commentary by the likes of such award-winning writers as Michael Chabon, Ursula K. LeGuin, Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Michael Cunningham and Stephen King.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | November 21, 2004
McSweeney's Enchanted Chamber of Astonishing Stories Edited and with an introduction by Michael Chabon (Vintage, 368 pages, $13.95) The goal of this short-story anthology is to revitalize genre fiction -- crime, adventure, sci-fi, horror, and romance stories -- by coaxing new examples from the hippest possible crowd of contemporary fiction writers. It's a formula that worked well in a previous volume, the 2003 Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales, also compiled by novelist Michael Chabon and the editors of the literary magazine McSweeney's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
A February harvest of novels, some with tender young stalks and others with the toughened bark of experience: Get ready for darkness and delights, starting with David Mitchell's Number9Dream (Random House, 400 pages, $24.95), which was short-listed for the Booker Prize (or, as it's usually said, "Britain's prestigious Booker Prize"). And what a rich and lively experience it is. Set in Japan, where Mitchell (Ghostwritten) teaches, it centers on young man, Eiji Miyaki, who travels to Tokyo from his rural roots to seek out his father.
NEWS
By Gary Dretzka, and Gary Dretzka,,Chicago Tribune | August 20, 1995
"Stormy Weather," by Carl Hiaasen. New York: Knopf. 352 pages. $24 Anyone who remembers the devastation caused by Hurricane Andrew also might recall that the tragedy was compounded by carloads of thieves and con artists who arrived in the storm's wake. Likewise, much of the damage to structures resulted from shortcuts taken by contractors and inspectors who allowed substandard construction on homes that were in Andrew's path.Mr. Hiaasen helped chronicle the calamity - both criminal and meteorological - for readers of the Miami Herald.
NEWS
By Mark Miller | June 29, 1992
DANGEROUS GAMES. By Susan Crosland. Random House. 294 pages. $20. SUSAN Crosland is the Baltimore native (daughter of Sun correspondent and editor Mark Watson) and writer who is much better known in London than she is in Baltimore or any other American city. She married twice, first to Sun correspondent Patrick Skene Catling, then to Labor Party politician Anthony Crosland, and has written for various British papers."Ruling Passions," her first novel, was a best-seller in Britain and did well here.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | December 11, 2002
When Nora Roberts' 151st novel, Chesapeake Blue - which is set in Maryland - recently debuted in the top spot on the New York Times' best-seller list, it was hardly, well, novel. After all, Roberts has spent so much time occupying that particular piece of prime real estate that she ought to be paying rent. All told, her romance fiction has spent a shade under seven years on that list and eight months at No. 1, according to information posted on her Web site (www.noraroberts.com). Last year, Roberts sold more books in the United States than John Grisham or Stephen King.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Special to the Sun | November 14, 2004
The Final Solution: A Story of Detection by Michael Chabon. Fourth Estate. 144 pages. $16.95. The crime writer gulps nervously when literary writers dabble in the genre. More precisely, this crime writer worries whenever a non-genre writer decides to take a flier on the form. The result usually ends in an insult either to the work itself, which drips with condescension, or in the response to the work. If critics find fault, the flaws are attributed to what they believe are the genre's limitations.
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