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By Glenn McNatt | January 28, 2001
Still lifes, the representation of inanimate objects such as flowers and fruit, have been painted since ancient times as decoration, but the genre didn't come into its own until 17th-century Holland, where it served to convey powerful religious, moral and social symbolism. As Beth Archer Brombert notes in her biography "Edouard Manet: Rebel in a Frock Coat," Dutch still lifes of tables overloaded with food symbolized the new society of men producing goods on the free market for their own profit, rather than for their feudal lords.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Robin Williams was one of the most original, daring and troubled comedians to ever work in television. When he first burst on the screen, you held your breath as you watched him dance out there on a manic tightrope of improvisation. But after a while, you stopped wondering how he did it and learned to just enjoy the high of seeing him soar. The 63-year-old comedian and actor was found dead Monday at his home in Tiburon, Calif., north of San Francisco. The cause of death is suspected to be suicide by asphyxiation, according to the Marin County coroner's office.
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NEWS
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
Marvette Perez acknowledges that she's no avid fan of hip-hop. Even now, she wouldn't list it among her favorite kinds of music. But when the Smithsonian museum curator talks about hip-hop, she sounds as if she's from the genre's "old school," reeling off the names of pioneers DJ Kool Herc, Grandmaster Flash and Afrika Bambaataa or alluding to the genre's influences, whether Jamaican toasting (rhythmic, poetic boasts) or recording artist James Brown. SAMPLES FROM THE FUTURE HIP-HOP EXHIBIT ON VIEW / / through Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Most music festivals aim to wow potential attendees with top-bill talent, but Scapescape, now in its third year, is not most festivals. "It sounds weird to say, but we want quantity over quality. We're looking for consistency throughout the day," said co-organizer Jimmy MacMillan. In other words, the folks behind Scapescape hope to expose listeners to as many different acts - 115 in all, and only 10 that aren't locally based - as possible between this coming Friday and Sunday at various Station North locations, including the Crown, the Windup Space, the Metro Gallery and lots on North Charles Street and West North Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
At the 2:17 mark of Britney Spears' 2011 hit single "Hold It Against Me," dubstep entered the mainstream. It had been bubbling around pop's surface before Spears put her glossy touch on it, but this was Top 40's most blatant — and effective — use of the increasingly popular electronic dance music sub-genre. As Spears' vocals cut out, the track builds to a climactic "breakdown," signified by dubstep's trademark bass wobble. It's deep enough to crush your chest, and it's a huge part of what makes the genre so appealing: A song builds and builds until the rug is suddenly ripped from under it, only to re-form.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2003
Besides teaching the greatest hits of American literature for 20 years, McDaniel College Professor Pamela Regis spent more than a decade researching a genre she calls "the Rodney Dangerfield" of fiction. She has become something of an expert on romance novels. And she says they get a bad rap. "We think now of romance novels as a kind of escape, but they once had a far more profound meaning than we now lend them and I would argue that meaning still exists," Regis said. "Somebody had to say the truth about the genre."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | September 7, 2007
For real movie lovers, fall is the season of our greatest content. It's when the Oscar contenders start making themselves known, when the big-name directors get their names up on the marquee, when the potential blockbusters promising both popularity and prestige start to open amid great rejoicing. Except ... maybe not so much this year. With fall 2007 just around the corner, no one film is dominating the movie-going discussion. The big-name directors - the Spielbergs, Scorseses, Eastwoods, Jacksons - are taking a breather, gearing up for big-time releases in 2008 and later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 14, 2004
The Lord of the Rings collected an awe-inspiring 11 Oscars, and its best-picture win was a first for a fantasy film. But fans of fantasy, horror and science-fiction entertainment can't count on the critical success of Rings - and its box-office records - to sweep their favorite genre from the multiplex to the TV schedule. The truth is stranger - and stronger - than fantasy: Market forces have a stranglehold on even the smaller networks and cable channels that used to nurture genre TV. "I do think it's harder for science fiction and genre shows to make it than it has been in the past.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 4, 2001
A group show of works by Christopher Myers, Rodney Carroll, Dan Dudrow and Lee E. Haner at Maryland Art Place recalls the long history of landscape painting with a decidedly contemporary twist. Each artist plays off this tradition by pushing it in new, sometimes unexpected directions. Viewers are left to consider what a landscape is and what meaning it has in contemporary urban society. Myers' startling photographic nudes, printed on stone fragments from a local demolition site, evoke both an ideal Arcadian past and the tragedy of Sept.
FEATURES
By KNIGHT/RIDDER TRIBUNE | June 23, 2006
Banking on the success of two American remakes of Japanese films, The Ring and The Grudge, Hollywood has at least 16 more remakes of so-called J-Horror films in various stages of acquisition, production and release - a major gamble on a minor genre. During the late '90s, Asian cinema produced a bunch of deliciously surreal and creepy flicks, including Tomie (she's so lovable, you're compelled to kill her) and Phone, about the cell phone from hell. Even as the phenomenon is being promoted in Everytown, U.S.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
When Santi White, aka Santigold, released her debut album in 2008, she earned comparisons to another forward-thinking sonic provocateur: M.I.A. Four years and a second album (last month's "Master of My Make-Believe") later, Santigold has eclipsed any similarities to ... well, anyone. Her blending of sounds - driving beats intersect with ska, reggae and punk touchstones, all delivered in a slick, danceable package - has made her brand of jittery pop wholly her own. Santigold, who performs Tuesday at Rams Head Live , spoke recently about beating trends, building a brand and her friendship with the late Adam "MCA" Yauch of the Beastie Boys.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Coming unstuck in time, Pamela Regis was investigating the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime. When the clocks struck 13, she dreamt she went to ... to Manderley? — no, McDaniel. Strange as it might seem, Regis' dream of jumbled-up literary genres will come true this August. In a manner of speaking. Aided by grants totaling $200,000 from the Nora Roberts Foundation, McDaniel College in Westminster is about to launch what is possibly the nation's first academic minor in genre fiction: horror, sci-fi, romance, fantasy, mystery and Westerns, as well as graphic novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | February 22, 2012
"Baseball Superstars 2012" Developer: Gamevil Platofrm: iOS/Android (free) Score: 7/10 There's a saying that baseball is a simple game until you try and explain it to someone who has never played it. With major league teams gearing up for the 2012 campaign, I would like to amend that statement to "baseball is a simple game until you try and explain it to someone through a Korean role-playing game. " That is was Gamevil has done with “Baseball Superstars 2012,” the latest iteration in the popular mobile series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2012
At the 2:17 mark of Britney Spears' 2011 hit single "Hold It Against Me," dubstep entered the mainstream. It had been bubbling around pop's surface before Spears put her glossy touch on it, but this was Top 40's most blatant — and effective — use of the increasingly popular electronic dance music sub-genre. As Spears' vocals cut out, the track builds to a climactic "breakdown," signified by dubstep's trademark bass wobble. It's deep enough to crush your chest, and it's a huge part of what makes the genre so appealing: A song builds and builds until the rug is suddenly ripped from under it, only to re-form.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | October 18, 2011
The thing about "The Thing" is that even an unnecessary remake can claim your attention. Amonster from outer space attacking scientists at an Antarctic outpost has a way of doing that. Following in the alien footprints of the 1951 and 1982 versions, this remake emphasizes the bleak isolation that turns human beings into an endangered species. Of course, these particular humans often behave in such foolish ways that an argument could be made on behalf of the alien determined to eliminate this inferior life form.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2011
If getting arrested and spending some time in a Klingon jail is your idea of a good time, then don't miss this weekend's Shore Leave 33. It could be the place your dream comes true. "People love it," says Michael Schilling, a spokesman for the three-day science-fiction and fantasy convention opening Friday in Hunt Valley. "People get arrested by Klingons in full costume, they throw you in jail. I think they do things like sing the 'Barney' song to torture you. " Sounds painful.
NEWS
October 5, 2006
Tamara Dobson, the Baltimore-born model-turned-actress best known for her leading role in two films as kung fu-fighting government super-agent Cleopatra Jones, died Monday at Keswick Multi-Care Center from complications of pneumonia and multiple sclerosis. She was 59. One of four children of a beauty shop operator and railroad clerk, Miss Dobson was a graduate of Western High School.
NEWS
August 21, 2008
MANNY FARBER, 91 Painter, film critic Manny Farber, a painter whose spiky, impassioned film criticism waged war against sacred cows such as Orson Welles and elevated American genre-movie directors like Howard Hawks and Sam Fuller to the Hollywood pantheon, died Monday at his home in Leucadia, Calif. His death was confirmed by Jean-Pierre Gorin, a friend and colleague at the University of California at San Diego. Mr. Farber, a quirky prose stylist with a barbed lance, responded to film viscerally.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Jonette Butler wants something understood: Balticon is not a comic book convention. "It's nothing like a comic book convention," said the chairwoman of this weekend's Balticon 45, which started Thursday and will run nearly continuously through 4 p.m. Monday at the Marriott in Hunt Valley. Pausing a moment for effect, Butler then adds mischievously, "and it's everything like a comic book convention. " What she probably means is that Balticon, like any good fan convention (be it dedicated to comic books, "Star Trek" or Civil War memorabilia)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Among the first things that hip-hop performer Damon Holley showed the assembled students at Ellicott Mills Middle School was that, as in schoolwork, learning about hip-hop requires undivided attention. Hip-hop artists simply go about getting that attention differently. "Every time you hear me say, 'What's the name of the game?' I want you all to say, 'Pay attention!' And then I want you to remain completely quiet," said Holley of Illstyle and Peace Productions, a Philadelphia-based dance company that staged a high-energy performance, "The History of Hip-Hop," at Ellicott Mills on Thursday.
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